Entertainment

La Chona Dance Breaks Out During Traffic Jam Is Most Mexican Thing to Happen Ever

If you need a reason to hold onto hope in the world, let us take a moment to comment on the resiliency of Latinos. We will not drown in sorrow or simply accept circumstances de mierda. We clap and cheer after an airplane lands. We yell, “wepa!” when we accidentally break things. We turn negatives into positives on the daily.

These Mexicans were stuck in a traffic jam from hell and instead of letting the stress of it all slowly kill them (read: science), they found it as an opportunity to get off their nalgas and dance to La Chona. 😂

Primero, meet the audience of the epic freeway dance party.

Credit: @miblogestublog / Twitter

In classic Latino flair, they didn’t care at all who was watching them get down to this iconic song. We dance in movie theaters, with the mop, and at dinner tables. You can’t stop the 🎼music, 🎼music, 🎼music.

Theory: Latinos’ secret to immortality lies in how we cope with stress. This image is stress-inducing, no doubt about it. Wait till you see how these Mexicanos dealt with that stress.

Jessica de la Torre shared a video of how Guadalajareños dealt with said traffic.

Credit: @JessdelaTorreM / Twitter

“¡AMO MI PAÍS! Cualquier adversidad por más mínima que sea le ponemos siempre la mejor cara. (Fue en Guadalajara, durante el tráfico. ) #Mexico #MexicanParty,” she tweeted.

Translation: “I LOVE MY COUNTRY! Any adversity, however minimal, we always put on the best face. (It was in Guadalajara, during traffic.) #Mexico#MexicanParty”

It’s official: this is the most Mexican thing to ever occur in the history of history.

Credit: @miblogestublog / Twitter

Verdad. Nowhere else will you see this level of community and thirst for life in the midst of a traffic jam. It’s the most puro Mexicano cosita we’ve seen. Congratulations, Guadalajara, this is all you.

A car started blasting “La Chona,” prompting everyone to hop out of their own cars to participate in this traffic jam magic.

Credit: @JessdelaTorreM / Twitter

The man filming showed us the intense, standstill traffic that allowed for everyone to get out and party for at least these few minutes.

Of course, the Twitter thread was all things precious and pure.

Credit: @al_morales / Twitter

Like this Mexican dad whose heart belongs to both La Chona and to his “charming” new puppy girl. We appreciate the “Adopt, Don’t Shop,” sentiment, too, Mr. Morales.

Some folks just already knew in their bones that the video would be all about “La Chona.”

Credit: @mrgamboa_83 / Twitter

Es obvio, no? After #LaChonaChallenge took over the Internet earlier this year, it’s become a valid expectation to watch a bunch of strangers jump out of their cars to start dancing to the classic song. Why? “Because La Chona es chida,” according to Twitter user Laura Martínez.

Is this what Mexican road rage looks like?

Credit: @MauShmall / Twitter

Answer: Sure, let’s go with that. 😂Latino road rage looks and sounds a lot more like, “que te cagas, pinche pendejo” and other vulgarities that we grew up with. Anyone else just copies what our parents said growing up thinking this was a friendly conversation and get smacked upside the head? #powpow

“Yah well f it – might as well. Saquen la chonaaaa” is the base level attitude of everyone involved in this precious moment that actually contributed positivity to this earth. “Excelente actitud,” seguro. 

Someone else could have sworn this was the I-5 that runs through the most Chicano barrio of Los Angeles.

Credit: @rukiddingme3590 / Twitter

“Is this interstate 5 in Los Angeles?” asks Douglas. It wouldn’t be that surprising given that Los Angeles is built by Chicanos, despite all the Hollywood notions of what Los Angeles looks like. The reality is that once you leave the beach communities, you’re basically in Guadalajara–both in terms of traffic and música.

In conclusion: Long Live Los Tucanes de Tijuana!

@primerclic / Twitter

The Mexican band has earned 12 Grammy nominations, but no wins. That’s okay because Latinos are forever awarding Los Tucanes de Tijuana as the president of all of our fun.

You can’t tear us down. You can’t terrorize us. We’re too committed to turning water into wine.

Watch the full video below!

READ: No Offense To Megan Thee Stallion But ‘La Chona’ Was The Original Hot Girl

Mexico And The World Mourn The Loss Of Celso Piña, One Of Mexico’s Greatest Musicians

Entertainment

Mexico And The World Mourn The Loss Of Celso Piña, One Of Mexico’s Greatest Musicians

wachamagazine / Instagram

If there’s one instrument that best describes Mexican music is has to be the accordion. While the musical key instrument known as a squeezebox has its origins in Europe, it indeed came alive in Mexico as the staple sound in rancheras and cumbias. There is only one musician who thrived through the accordion sound, though sadly that is now a thing of the past.

Celso Piña, known as the “The Accordion Rebel,” died yesterday at the age of 66.

Credit: Instagram/@danonewillrise297

The Mexican musician was in his hometown of Monterrey, Mexico, and was soon scheduled to g on tour, but had a heart attack and died at the hospital.

La Tuna Group, Piña’s record label, confirmed in a statement that he died yesterday at 12:38 p.m. after suffering a heart attack.

Credit: Instagram/@mexicoprimero_

“Today is a sad day for La Tuna Group,” they stated, “Our deepest condolences to his family, friends, and followers. We are left with an intense emptiness, but he leaves us his great legacy forever. We appreciate respecting the privacy of the family.”

Piña seemed to have been in good spirits earlier in the day and tweeted for the final time. “No one can resist the cumbia,” he said.

The self-taught musician had been touring off and on for months. He also had upcoming shows in Georgia and Texas.

The Grammy-award winning musician had a musical career that spanned 40 decades, and aside from his musical stylings as an accordion player, he was also a composer, singer, and arranger.

Credit: Instagram/@patanegra_mx

Piña had collaborated with several contemporary artists including Lila Downs, Julieta Venegas, Cafe Tacvba, and Gloria Trevi, Variety reports. He was also more than a cumbia musician. His sound also fused into other musical genres, including norteña music, hip-hop, ska, reggae, and more.

Several celebrity fans and collaborators tweeted their heartfelt condolences.

According to the Grammy Academy, Piña got his hands on his first accordion in 1980. He taught himself how to play and performed with his brothers. “Together, they went on to play norteña and tropical music, eventually adding cumbia to their style,” the Academy states. “The brothers became known as ‘Celso Piña Y Su Ronda Bogotá,’ giving a nod to cumbia’s motherland.”

Fans on social media also expressed how much Piña meant to them.

One fan, @iphadra, tweeted, “his greatness of # CelsoPiña is not due to its successes or fame in the 5 continents. It is because it was he who came to claim the music of the marginalized.” @JJ4rmCh tweeted, Rest In Peace Celso Piña, no one fucked it up on an accordion like u did.” But this tweet we could totally relate to from @jennjenn1_  who tweeted, “It wasn’t a real quince or wedding until you played some #CelsoPiña ❤️🇲🇽 🎶🎶🎶 may his music live on for generations to come.”

Writer Melissa del Bosque had the honor of being able to interview him. She tweeted, “Hearing ‘Barrio Bravo’ for the first time was a life-changing experience. Celso Piña and Toy Hernández, of Control Machete, had created a whole new hybrid mixing Colombian cumbia with the anarchy of urban streets. I went directly to Monterrey to interview El Rebelde del Acordeón. Here we are at Cafe Brasil, one of his favorite haunts. As I wrote then, when ‘Cumbia Sobre el Rio hit the airwaves there wasn’t a car from Chicago to Chiapas that didn’t have the bass booming and the sonic onslaught layered with accordion rattling their windows.’ #RipCelsoPina.”

Last year, Piña visited one of his biggest fans, who is also an accordion player just like him. The two performed in the streets of Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Herrera recalled what it was like hearing that his musical idol had died. The young musician told El Universal that he was with his daughter when he heard the news that Piña had died. He said he couldn’t believe it, and all the memories from his incredible visit with him last year rushed back to him. He said it was a dream to have been able to perform with him. 

Here’s a couple of his most beloved and hit songs.

Here’s “Cumbia Sobre el Rio Suena” live and with an orchestra! He had such a distinct voice and sound. There was no one else like him.

“No Sea Conmigo”

This was his collaboration with Cafe Tacvba. So lovely! We dare you not to dance to this one.

What’s your favorite Celso Piña track? Let us know in the comment section below. Rest in power, Celso!!

READ: This Isn’t Your Mama’s Cumbia: The Eclectic History Of Latin America’s Classic Music Genre

A Judge In Mexico City Has Approved One Couple’s Request For Recreational Cocaine

Things That Matter

A Judge In Mexico City Has Approved One Couple’s Request For Recreational Cocaine

Unsplash

In a historic step toward ending the country’s deadly “war on drugs”, a judge in Mexico has approved the request of two people to legally possess, transport and use cocaine. Víctor Octavio Luna Escobedo, an administrative court judge in Mexico City, made the historic decisions saying “the consumption of cocaine doesn’t put one’s health in great risk, except in the case that it’s used chronically and excessively.”

Mexico United Against Crime (MUCD), a nongovernmental organization filed injunction requests on behalf of the two individuals. It pursued the case with goals to trying to change Mexico’s drug policy. At the core of the organization’s argument is that criminalizing consumers causes even more violence. If the ruling is ratified by a higher court, it would be the first time any cocaine use has been legal in Mexico.

According to Mexico Daily News, the Mexico City judge set a string of stipulations for the unidentified couple in order for them to use the cocaine. This includes regulating the amount they intake to 500 milligrams per day and not working, driving or operating heavy machinery while under the influence of the substance. This also includes not being able to consume cocaine in public, in the presence of children, or even encourage others to consume it.

So is cocaine really legal in Mexico? Here’s what you need to know. 

Credit: @CNN / Twitter

The order by the judge to the country’s health authority has many wondering if one day Mexico could, at some point, legalize cocaine use, but only on a case-by-case basis. As of now, the judge’s ruling must be reviewed by a higher court panel of judges for the case to move forward. 

“We have been working for a safer, more just and peaceful Mexico for years, and with this case we insist on the need to stop criminalizing users of drugs other than marijuana and design better public policies that explore all available options, including the regulation,” Lisa Sanchez, director of MUAC, said in a statement.

The judge wrote in his ruling that the use of cocaine has certain benefits if consumed responsibly. “Ingestion can have various results, including alleviating tension, intensification of perceptions and the desire for new personal and spiritual experiences,” the judge said.

While two people have been allowed to take the drug, there is a bevy of injunctions and court orders that have followed. Which means the judge’s decisions could still be overturned.

Credit: @Vice / Twitter

 Cofepris, Mexico’s national health regulator, is being ordered to authorize the two people to legally possess, transport and use cocaine. But Cofepris says that such authorization is outside its power and has now blocked the court order as a result. The rulings are set to be reviewed by three collegiate court judges that will then set forth the legal standing of judges ruling.

The next step in the decision will be an appeal to the circuit court. This essentially means that the case could land all the way up to Mexico’s Supreme Court. Even if the decision is then upheld, cocaine wouldn’t suddenly become legal in Mexico. While in the U.S., a Supreme Court ruling makes it the law of the land, In Mexico the Supreme Court must hand down similar rulings in at least four other cases.

“This case is about insisting on the need to stop criminalizing users of drugs… and design better public policies that explore all the available options, including regulation,” Sanchez said.

The ruling could be a landmark moment and opportunity for debate in Mexico, where a 15 year-long drug war has taken the lives of many. 

Credit: @standardnews / Twitter

Mexico has become a central battleground and transit point for cocaine being transported to the United States. Trafficking gangs have also grown immensely since 2006 when then-President Felipe Calderón sent in the country’s army to fight drug traffickers. More than 20,000 people have been killed and 40,000 disappeared since then. This year has already been a stark reminder of the deadly drug war as Mexico is on pace to have the most murders on record.

“This case represents another step in the fight to construct alternative drug policies that allow [Mexico] to redirect its security efforts and better address public health,” Sanchez said. “We have spent years working for a more secure, just and peaceful Mexico.” 

READ: This Shipment Of Jalapeños Turned Out To Be One Of The Year’s Biggest Marijuana Bust

Paid Promoted Stories