Entertainment

Pioneer, Feminist, Proud Mexican: Katy Jurado Changed Hollywood In The 1950s

Whether you know Katy Jurado from your Mexican mami calling every one of her friend’s daughter’s “the next Katy Jurado” or from her actual 1940’s Golden Age of Mexican cinema films, Katy Jurado is a Latino household name.

She was stunning and often played the archetype of a villainous “femme fatale” that every Feminism 101 class studies. Above all, she was a pioneer for Latinas everywhere.

Her full name is María Cristina Estela Marcela Jurado García.

CREDIT: @cinemexicanotv / Instagram

Born in Guadalajara, to Luis Jurado Ochoa and Vicenta Estela García de la Garza. Luis was an lawyer and Vicenta was a singer. Vicenta’s brother, Katy’s uncle, was famous musician Belisario de Jesús García (think “Las Cuatro Milpas”).

Jurado was a Capricorn.

CREDIT: @VLo_CA / Twitter

She was born on January 16, 1924, and like a true Capricorn, she had major career ambitions. While she went to a school run by Guadalupe nuns, by the time she was a teenager, producers were inviting her to work as an actress.

She signed her first contract without permission from her parents, making her first film when she was 16.

CREDIT: @JoseACastillo21 / Twitter

When her parents found out, they threatened to send her to a boarding school in Monterrey. However, that did not deter her for chasing her dreams.

Her family was so wealthy, they owned most of Texas until the Revolution.

CREDIT: @kimloubat / Instagram

Her parents’ holdings were confiscated during the Mexican Revolution, and the parental power mostly laid in Jurado’s abuelita.

Think of her as the Silver Screen Veronica Lodge. She was so set on pursuing her career, that she ended up working as a movie columnist and bullfight critic to support herself.

Jurado’s love for bullfighting won over John Wayne himself.

CREDIT: @JoseACastillo21 / Twitter

Her work as a movie columnist and bullfight critic landed her within sight of John Wayne at a bullfight. He immediately cast her in his film Bullfighter and the Lady (1951).

They also briefly dated, va va voom.

After that film, Hollywood wanted her to play alongside Grace Kelly in “High Noon.”

CREDIT: @coophem / Instagram

High Noon is as classic of a Western as you can get. These days, we think of them as an archaic past, but it was filmed in real time. A sheriff retires, but the plot thickens when some outlaws escape jail and come to get him.

She spoke no English and literally just memorized the sounds of the English lines.

CREDIT: @dcdulce / Twitter

She took English classes two hours a day for two months to begin to understand English for the role.

Caption: “I know the feeling Katy, I know the feeling. #BeingMexicanInTheUSAintEasy”

With that performance, she became the first Latina to win a Golden Globe.

CREDIT: @OldCinema4EVER / Instagram

In the film, she played a saloon owner, Helen Ramírez, an old love interest of star Gary Cooper. Katy Jurado is seen here consoling Cooper’s character’s wife (Grace Kelly), who is abandoning her husband. Ramirez convinces her to stay and fight.

Jurado is best known for breaking stereotypes.

CREDIT: @moonchildmag / Instagram

The New York Times quotes Katy Jurado as being proud of her role on High Noon:

“I am very proud to make this picture because I look and act like a Mexican – not imitation. Some Mexicans go to Hollywood and lose a career in Mexico because they play imitation. I don’t want this to happen to me.”

Instead of being highly sexualized like other Mexican roles, Jurado took on villainous roles.

CREDIT: @kimloubat / Instagram

The LA Times quotes her as saying, “I didn’t take all the films that were offered, just those with dignity.” Once, she played a Jewish woman in “Barabbas” alongside Anthony Quinn. She told the Associated Press that she wouldn’t play shallow American stereotypes of Mexicans.

She got married when she was 15 years old.

CREDIT: @kimloubat / Instagram

She was with aspiring actor Victor Velázquez for four years before they divorced. They got married just three months after she signed that secret contract.

In 1959, she married actor Ernest Borgnine.

CREDIT: @SegundoPlatoCin / Twitter

The two met on the set of Vera Cruz, which was filmed in Mexico. The two divorced four years later.

He famously described her as “beautiful, but a tiger.”

CREDIT: @SegundoPlatoCin / Twitter

According to Laura Arnáiz’ biography of Katy Jurado’s life, Jurado said, “Borgnine and I met by accident when we collided in a dark room when leaving a restaurant. He chased me for two years. What did I do for that this man loves me this way? Our courtship was one of the best periods of my life. We were married soon after, but his jealousy and insecurities turned the marriage into hell.”

Jurado also had an affair with Marlon Brando, who was simultaneously dating Rita Moreno.

CREDIT: @CitizenScreen / Twitter

He was also married to Movita Castaneda. After Brando saw her in High Noon, he was smitten and asked her out on a date, which became a years-long affair.

According to Darwin Porter’s biography of Marlon Brando, Brando Unzipped, years later Jurado recalled in an interview, “Marlon called me one night for a date, and I accepted. I knew all about Movita. I knew he had a thing for Rita Moreno. Hell, it was just a date. I didn’t plan to marry him.”

Jurado claims that the love of her life was novelist Louis L’Amour.

CREDIT: @WriterEZertuche / Instagram

According to El Periodico, Jurado said, “I have letters of love that he wrote to me until the last day of his life, but because of our jobs we could never coincide, he was the man of my life, and I, the woman of his life, should have married that man .. . ”

After her son, Victor Hugo, tragically died in a car accident, she pulled out of acting.

CREDIT: @Sergiofordy / Twitter

She went to the funeral one day and the next went back to set. She said she hated the camera during that time as a symbol of what took her away from spending time with her kids while she had them.

Director John Huston invited her to act in Under the Volcano years later, to help pull her out of her depression.

That same year, she played alongside Héctor Elizondo in an ABC family sitcom.

CREDIT: @SilverAgeTV / Twitter

The most shocking element of this photo is realizing that Elizondo (famous for Princess Diaries) was ever young. The series only lasted six episodes.

In 1954, she became the first Mexican woman to be awarded los claves a NYC.

CREDIT: @juangabrieleldivo_sv / Twitter

She spent most of her life in her home in Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, and said that she felt she’d have been more successful in Hollywood if she wasn’t so ready to leave Los Angeles between filming.

Jurado won three Silver Ariel awards and was nominated for an Oscar.

CREDIT: @oscar_moviestar / Instagram

The Ariels are the Mexican Oscars. She was nomiated for an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for her work in Broken Lance.

This year, Google recognized Katy Jurado with a doodle on her birthday, January 16.

CREDIT: @juanmapregunta / Twitter

While today, we might find her villainous seduction problematic, Jurado truly paved the way for more Latin American actresses to make a stake as something more than a sex object. She played women who had more than one side to them, who had motives, a brain, and a willingness to bend social norms to meet their needs.

Jurado died in 2002 at age 78.

CREDIT: @cinemexicanotv / Instagram

You can find her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and marvel in her incredible performance on High Noon–remembering that she acted out a foreign language phonetically.


READ: 24 Latino Actors Who Didn’t Make It To The Oscars Because They Lived In The Pre-Social Media Age

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Netflix Has Confirmed That ‘Narcos: Mexico’ Is Coming Back For Season 3 Without Diego Luna

Entertainment

Netflix Has Confirmed That ‘Narcos: Mexico’ Is Coming Back For Season 3 Without Diego Luna

Azhar Khan / SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty Images

“Narcos” is one of Netflix’s most wildly popular original series. Over the years, fans have learned about Narcos culture and history through the show and we are officially getting another season. Here’s what we know.

“Narcos: Mexico” Season 3 is coming to Netflix and, like, omg.

“Narcos” first started with following the drug trade in Colombia with Pablo Escobar. The fourth season was instead “Narcos: Mexico” and the beginnings of the Mexican drug trade became the focus of the series. Fans went wild for the show and it has continued to enjoy success with the Netflix audience.

Showrunner Eric Newman is stepping down in the coming season.

Instead, co-creator Carlos Bernard is stepping up and taking on the role of showrunner. Newman was the showrunner for five seasons since “Narcos” first started and is excited to see the show develop under Bernard.

“I am grateful for my five years at the helm of ‘Narcos’ and ‘Narcos: Mexico’ and am immensely proud of what this spectacular team has achieved with these shows,” Newman told Variety. “Carlos Bernard is the first person I ever spoke to about this project, over ten years ago, and I am extremely pleased to leave the steering of Season 3 of ‘Narcos: Mexico’ in his very capable hands.”

Brace yourself because Diego Luna is not joining the cast this season.

Tbh, Luna was one of the best parts of the show. He isn’t everything but he was a major part of the iconic and beloved show. The news is bumming out large parts of the “Narcos” fanbase who have come to love and look forward to him.

People are ready for this to happen yesterday.

Like, thank you for letting us know it is happening Netflix. Now we need to know when the show will actually be released. We appreciate the little update but we just need to know when we can watch the show.

We look forward to the release date, Netflix.

We are ready to sit on the couch and binge the season the moment it drops. Let’s get this together and get the show streaming. Thank you so very much!

READ: Diego Luna Talks The Importance Of The Storytelling In ‘Narcos: Mexico’ And Why Mexico City Will Always Be His Home

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These 9 Arroz Con Frijoles Recipes From Latin America Will Change Your Nightly Dinner

Culture

These 9 Arroz Con Frijoles Recipes From Latin America Will Change Your Nightly Dinner

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One of the most iconic dishes from Latin America is arroz con frijoles. The mix of rice and beans is a smell and taste that sends every Latino back to their childhood. Mami and abuela always know how to make beans better than we ever can. However, practice makes perfect. Just try these recipes until you finally land on the flavor and texture you remember from childhood.

1. Casamiento Salvadoreño

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#casamientosalvadoreño

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Casamiento Salvadoreño is a beautiful marriage of rice, red beans, peppers, and onion. The four different components get added at different times slowly building up until you hit the perfect balance in the flavor and consistency. If you like a savory breakfast, pair it up with some eggs and maduros and enjoy a Salvadoran breakfast.

2. Arroz Congri

Arroz Congri is one of the most quintessential dishes of Cuban cuisine. The mix of the rice and black beans is something you can find in any Cuban home or restaurant. The dish relies on the rice, bell peppers, and beans cooking together with spices until the water is absorbed. The method of cooking is how you can plate it in the iconic thick disc shape that we all know and love.

3. Arroz Com Feijão Preto

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Sometimes, I cook at home in my kitchen. Here is a comforting and ridicously delicious Brazilian Black Bean recipe These black bean beauties are cooked with onions, garlic, and seasoned perfectly with coriander, cumin, oregano, salt and pepper, next garnish with a lime wedge and sprig of cilantro to brighten it all up. They make a great side dish to enchiladas and more. Ingredients: 2 cans Black Beans, drained and rinsed 1/2 Tbls cooking oil 2/3 cups diced, white onion 2-3 garlic cloves, finely minced (I use a microplane zester) 2/3 cups chicken stock or broth 1/4 tspn cumin 1/4 tspn coriander 1/4 tspn mexican oregano salt &pepper to taste 1 lime and sprig of cilantro for garnish Instructions: In a small bowl mix together the cumin, coriander, and mexican oregano and set aside. In a saucepan on the stove, heat the olive oil to med-high heat. Saute onions for about 3 minutes or until they just start to become translucent. Add garlic and saute abut 30 seconds more. Add beans and broth, and seasonings then bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a low simmer and simmer for about 7-9 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add salt and pepper to taste. When they are done cooking, remove from heat and add in a few squeezes of fresh lime juice. Then use the back of a spoon or rubber spatula to lightly mash some of the beans. You don’t want to pulverize all of the beans. The beans will thicken more upon resting. You can add more broth/stock if, they get to thick. Recipe adapted by Our Best Bites I've been making this recipe since 2009. It is my absolute favorite black bean recipe. @utahanaskitchen @ourbestbites #blackbeans #brazilianblackbeans #sidedish #semihomemade #cooking #homecooking

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Arroz com Feijão Preto is Brazil’s answer to the regional love of rice and beans. What really sets these beans apart is the use of bacon to add some flavor and substance to the dish. Of course, there are still some veggies included but the true magic of this Brazilian dish comes from the smoky and salty bacon flavor.

4. Tacu-Tacu

Peru is known to be one of the best food destinations in the world. Tacu-Tacu is just another example of Peru’s superior food status in the world. The most unique, and fun, thing about this arroz con frijoles dish is the shape. To achieve the texture for this you have to remember to let the rice sit in the bean mixture for 15 minutes so that the rice absorbs enough liquid to be malleable.

5. Gallopinto

Gallopinto is another version of arroz con frijoles that requires properly layering and add the ingredients. The rice does cook for a brief moment with the onion until it is coated with the hot oil before adding the water. After the rice is done you add the beans and let the delicious dish cook to perfection.

6. Arroz Con Habichuelas

Olives go a long way it making this Dominican dish really stand out. Arroz con habichuelas is a classic Dominican dish that brings together chicken bouillon, olives, rice, and beans together to create something you won’t forget.

7. Arroz Con Queso

Okay, so this isn’t an arroz con frijoles recipe. However, who doesn’t like trying new things. Arroz con queso is a famous Bolivian dish and it is always worth trying something new. Cheese is one of the greatest and most important food groups, tbh so rice with cheese is just…. *chef’s kiss.*

8. Arroz Con Gandules

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Order today #Thursday #ArrozConGandules

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Another rice dish that doesn’t use beans but is still just as delicious. Arroz con gandules is a Puerto Rican dish with pigeon peas that every rice loves needs to try at least once. Just one bite will transport you directly to the Caribbean island and will make you scream “WEPA!”

9. Arroz Con Frijoles Refritos

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These Vegetarian Enchiladas @lasmargaritasbc were AMAZING. You can definitely get one of the protein enchiladas (they have a variety) but I really wanted to try this one. It's Two corn tortillas rolled with cheese, green onions, olives, green peppers, tomatoes. Covered with a mild red enchilada sauce, melted cheese and topped with sour cream. Served with refried beans and mexican rice ($14.95). You honestly, don't even miss the meat! You also get complimentary chips and salsa. I love mexican rice and beans and this definitely hit the spot. Would 10/10 recommend. – – – – – #foodgram#instaeat#eatinvancouver#foodie#foodadventures#instafood#instalike#instafollow#followforfollow#foodgram#foodie#foodphotography#foodcoma#eeeeeats#instafoodie#girllikestoeat#604foodie#enchiladas#vegetarian#mexicanfood#mexicanriceandbeans#vegetarianrecipes#healthyfood

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It’s all about the beans here. They have to be cooked more than once and in more than one way. After all, they are called refried beans so they aren’t just cooked once and done. These are a classic around the world and you have definitely had them whenever you went to a Mexican restaurant.

READ: This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food

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