Entertainment

John Legend’s New Music Video Centered Around Immigration and Deportation Will Leave A Lump In Your Throat

John Legend’s new music video for “Surefire” is shedding light on real-life stories, and it’s touching the hearts of so many people.

Widely known for his songs about love, John Legend’s new music video, “Surefire,” directed by Cole Wiley, is taking the power of love to a whole other level. John Legend is using his platform to raise awareness on issues such as love and how relationships are being destroyed because of the current climate on immigration. Grab a tissue, this hits home for so many of us.


READ: Here’s Why Juanes and John Legend Performed at an Immigration Detention Center

Spread the love and awareness by hitting the share button below. 

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Man Records His Mother’s Vile Anti-Gay Religious Rant After He Tells Her He Is Engaged

Culture

Man Records His Mother’s Vile Anti-Gay Religious Rant After He Tells Her He Is Engaged

henrit0 / Instagram

Henry Jimenez wanted to share the news with his mother that he was finally engaged to his boyfriend. Instead of her being kind to him she launched into a vile and hateful anti-gay rant she disguised as a religious matter. The video of the encounter will break your heart and the son breaks down in tears over her angry words.

Henry Jimenez broke hearts when he posted a video of his mother’s anti-gay, religious rant.

Jimenez shared the news with his mother that he was engaged. The influencer, as so many Latinos, wanted to share in the moment with his mother. He knew what would happen but still wanted to give his mother a chance to know. What followed was a hateful rant that would leave any child in tears.

At one point in the video, the mother says that her son being gay and engaged is going to kill her faster. You can see Jimenez’s heart break when his mother continued her verbal assault about how he is a sinner.

People are stunned that the mother could speak that way to her child.

Credit: _fanyluu / Instagram

“How sad that she is so blind,” wrote _fanyluu. “And how ugly that she is such a blackmailer telling you that you are going to kill her…very bad on her part.”

Seeing moments like this are heartbreaking but create a stronger community of support.

Credit: andrewtorpie / Instagram

Being gay is one of the scariest things. The moment someone realizes that they are gay they immediately become different and have a secret from everyone else. It can be alienating and terrifying to navigate alone. Fortunately, social media created a safe space for LGBTQ+ people to connect and continues to be a valuable resource for LGBTQ+ people.

Despite the video, Jimenez’s love for his fiance is real and enduring.

Congratulations on your engagement, Henry! Love is love is love. We love to see two people happy and in love. May your marriage be filled with all of the happiness and love you two clearly deserve.

READ: A Gay Single Father Of 3 Is Using TikTok To Share His Family’s Love With The World

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This Inmate Firefighter Was Nearly Killed Battling California Blazes But Now He’s Facing Deportation

Things That Matter

This Inmate Firefighter Was Nearly Killed Battling California Blazes But Now He’s Facing Deportation

David McNew / Getty Images

Across the United States there are hundreds of thousands of undocumented Americans doing their part to protect and better the country. But far too often, our communities and our leaders don’t return the favor.

One man, a former inmate who was injured while battling California’s historic wildfires, was turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) after he was released from prison. Instead of being given a second chance, he faces likely deportation back to his native country of Laos – a place he hasn’t known since he was 4 years old.

A California man is facing deportation after nearly dying on the frontlines of the state’s wildfires.

A formerly incarcerated firefighter who helped battle California’s historic wildfires is now in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody, after the state notified the agency he was being released.

Bounchan Keola, 39, left his native Laos at the age of 4. His home is here in the United States – in San Leandro, CA to be exact. But he’s facing the ultimate punishment of being sent back to a place he knows nothing about.

“He made a mistake as a child. He came here impoverished and he was resettled as a refugee when he was 6,” said his San Francisco Asian Law Caucus attorney, Anoop Prasad. “And he literally risked his life. California didn’t have to call ICE to deport him…This case is extremely sad and unfortunate. Society has failed him again and again.” 

Even more shocking is that Keola only had 14 days left on his prison term when he was crushed by a tree while battling the Zogg Fire in early October. He was soon released from prison but then taken into immigration custody by ICE.

While fighting a wildfire, Keyla was severely injured.

Credit: David McNew / Getty Images

Although Keola was convicted of attempted second degree murder, not only has he served his term but he also gave back to the community as one of the thousands of inmate firefighters battling the state’s blazes. In fact, he received a shorter prison sentence because of the extra credit he earned for fighting fires. 

Incarcerated firefighters get two days credit off their sentence for every day they’re working and are paid up to $5 a day. It’s estimated they save the state tens of millions of dollars a year. 

But then Keola got injured.

While he was stationed in Redding, CA., a tree fell on him while he was clearing brush to stop the fire from spreading. He is still in excruciating pain, his lawyer said, and he has not received the proper medical attention.

Since his release from prison, Keola has been in ICE detention.

Just seven days after being injured and with seven days left in his prison term, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation notified ICE that his release would be coming up. On Oct. 16, the day Keola finished serving his prison sentence in Sacramento, ICE came to pick him up. On Oct. 29, an immigration judge ordered his removal to Laos, records show.

Since being picked up by ICE, Keola has been held at a detention facility in Kern County. Although he faces a deportation order, Laos doesn’t have a repatriation agreement with the U.S., which means he could end up staying in California. But his fate is still unclear. And only a pardon from Newsom, his attorneys said, would expunge his record and allow him to go home freely to his parents and sister. 

I just want to go home and give my mom and dad a hug,” Keola told The Guardian, the first news organization to report the story. “All I know is I’m American. I’ve never thought of myself not being a citizen. I’m just asking for that one, second chance.”

Keola’s fate is in the hands of Gov. Newsom as he awaits a potential pardon for his crime.

Gov. Newsom has painted himself as a champion of those who have been incarcerated and fought on the front lines to save California during the wildfire season. That’s why Keola and his attorney say that his fate is in the hands of the governor. He has asked for a pardon from his prison sentence, showing that he has changed for the better and that his service to the state battling wildfires should count for something.

On Sept. 11,  Newsom signed AB 2147, a bill that will allow formerly incarcerated people to be able to try to expunge their records and become professional firefighters. Inmates who have stood on the frontlines, battling historic fires should not be denied the right to later become a professional firefighter,” Newsom later said in a tweet after signing the bill. 

Yet Keola, an inmate fighting fire on the frontlines, hasn’t been given that chance. And although California is a sanctuary state, which forbids most cooperation with ICE, Keola was still handed over to the agency.

Newsom’s spokesperson, Jesse Melgar, said in a statement: “We are unable to discuss individual clemency applications, but can assure that each application receives careful and individualized consideration.”

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