Entertainment

J Balvin Is Opening Up About His Battle With Coronavirus And He Says This Was His Worst Symptom

As more and more celebrities share their Covid-19 diagnoses, J Balvin is opening up about his intense fight against the virus. Not only did he suffer from the intense physical effects of Covid-19 infection, but he admits that he lost all hope because of it’s effect on his mental health.

The reggaetonero, who has long been open about his own struggles with mental health, confessed in an Instagram post that his anxiety came raging back amid his battle against Covid-19 -– causing him to lose all hope at one point.

J Balvin revealed that he lost all hope amid his battle against Covid-19.

Having been hit ‘hard’ by a Covid-19 infection, J Balvin says that he actually lost all hope as he fought back against the virus. Although the Colombian megastar did suffer from a particularly strong infection, Balvin revelas that it was his anxiety that had the biggest effect on him.

When he revealed he had contracted the virus, at the Premios Juventud, he said, “Right now I am just coming off COVID-19. They have been very difficult days, very complicated. Sometimes you think that it is not going to hit you but it got me and it got me very hard.”

Since that announcement, J Balvin has detailed his fight against the virus and it’s a reminder of how careful we all need to be. He confessed that suffering from the disease was one of the most complicated experiences of his life, and that it is a mistake for the rest of us to think of it as a game – because it’s very dangerous.

“It is one of the most difficult health experiences I have had in my life; you think it’s a joke because there is a lot of fake news,” he said. “I feel it’s almost killing me, fever of 40º C, chills, loss of smell, low oxygen, loss of taste, and fear of feeling that one of the worst nightmares of today is inside you. I had a very bad time,” he added.

Having long been open about his struggle with mental health, Balvin shared that anxiety hit him hard.

Credit: Global Citizen / Getty Images

J Balvin has long been open about his struggle with mental health. He’s one of the few Latino stars who is open about mental health issues and his openness has had a major impact on Latinos being able to speak about their own issues.

The singer is once again opening up about these issues as they came out in full force once again, as he battled Covid-19. For him, the days with the virus were complicated not only by the symptoms it causes, but also by the anxiety that came rushing to the surface once again.

With his heart in hand, he said: “I have suffered from anxiety and as a result of this event it became more potent, but I accept and face the aspects that affect my body and my mind and, I recognize that I am vulnerable and VERY fragile, before this and thousands of more situations.”

Balvin has previously been candid about his health — and in June penned a personal essay for PEOPLE, in which he opened up about his struggles with anxiety and depression. In the essay, the singer credited meditation with helping him overcome those struggles. In fact, Balvin said that the practice “saved my life.”

The reggaetonero gave a major shoutout to the medical workers who helped keep him – and so many others – safe.

Credit: J Balvin / Instagram

Although J Balvin suffered from an intense case of Covid-19, he has given several shoutouts to the medical team who helped make sure he was in good hands.

He uploaded a photo to his Instagram to show his immense gratitude to not only his doctor, but the tens of thousands of medical workers across the world who are working to protect and help those infected by the virus.

J Balvin explained that the photograph was taken by the doctor on a very critical day, in which he presented all the symptoms and in which they even thought of hospitalizing him. He goes on to say that he now considers these people who helped him as members of his family.

Speaking about the photo, he said “They are the ones who took care of me professionally, they are family. I remember this photo because at that precise moment, I had all the symptoms and I lost hope, to the level that they thought of hospitalizing me,” wrote the singer.

J Balvin is just one of many celebrities who have battled the virus.

Credit: Blake Whitaker / Getty Images

As beaches, restaurants, and even bars and clubs started to reopen, it was easy to forget that we are still in the midst of a global health crisis – one that continues to hit the Latino community, in particular, very hard. And stars, they really are just like us. Celebrities are also at risk of contracting Covid-19 and over the last few days, we’ve learned that several of Latin music’s biggest stars have in fact been infected with the virus.

As if a reminder that stars, they’re just like us, several of Latin music’s biggest celebrities have announced that they’ve tested positive for Covid-19. Karol G, Prince Royce, and Chiquita Rivera have all shared their positive diagnosis for the virus and are urging fans to stay home and use masks when they have to go out.

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Billboard Listed The Top 50 Latin Music Songs Of All Time And Some People Have Questions

Entertainment

Billboard Listed The Top 50 Latin Music Songs Of All Time And Some People Have Questions

shakira / jbalvin / Instagram

Latin music is something we all grew up with. Our parents raised us on the voices of Celia Cruz and Vicente Fernandez. We cleaned the house and entertained ourselves on road trips to these artists and they are ingrained in our DNA. Billboard recently released a list of the 50 best Latin music songs of all time and some are undoubtedly iconic and others just aren’t Latin music.

Billboard dropped their list for the 50 best Latin music songs of all time and some of them are truly classics.

Amor Prohibido” by Selena, “Guantanamera” by Celia Cruz, “El Rey” by Vicente Fernandez, and “El dia que me quieras” by Luis Miguel are just a few of the songs on the list that deserve all the praise. They are songs that transport us to our childhoods and cherished family memories.

The list also includes some newer songs that have rocked out adult worlds. “Despacito” by Luis Fonsi, “Mi Gente” by J Balvin, “El Farsante” by Ozuna, and “Tusa” by Karol G and Nicki Minaj all made the list. Not only do these songs speak to the Latino audience, they have been able to go mainstream sharing our musical culture with the world. That’s something to admire and respect because it gives our community representation like never before.

The list has proven to be just want some people have been asking for.

Tbh, this would make a pretty amazing road trip playlist if you need to pass the time. Nothing like a mix of Latin music songs playing along to give you a big, inclusive sabor of Latin America through music. A little be of Mexico and a little bit of Puerto Rico mixed in with a little bit of Colombia is pure joy and magic.

However, a lot of people are questioning the list’s inclusion of Spanish artists.

The list has various artists who are not Latino, but Spanish. There seems to be an unspoken rule in the music industry that music in Spanish is automatically Latin music. Fans have long been arguing against the industry’s blanket label of Spanish-language music automatically being considered Latin music.

Rosalía, who has arguably become the face of the debate, is listed as having one of the best Latin music songs of all time.

While Rosalía does make some good music, there is a real push to make sure the artists of Latin American roots are uplifted in Latin music. There is nothing wrong with including Rosalía in your Spanish-language playlists but Latin music fans want the distinction made that some artists aren’t Latino.

You can check out the rest of the Billboard list here.

READ: Vogue México Put A Spanish Music Artist On Their Cover And Called Her Latina And Latinos Almost Set Twitter On Fire

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Peru’s Indigenous Are Turning To Ancestral Medicines To Fight The Coronavirus

Culture

Peru’s Indigenous Are Turning To Ancestral Medicines To Fight The Coronavirus

Joao Laet / Getty Images

With news headlines like “How Covid-19 could destroy indigenous communities”, it’s hard to understate the affect that the Coronavirus has had on Indigenous communities across the world.

Even before the pandemic hit, native populations were already at increased risk of health complications, poor access to medical care, lack of proper education, and even premature death. The pandemic has only exacerbated these issues as government programs and NGOs who delivered aid to far flung communities have grind to a halt.

However, many communities have started taking the matter into their own hands by creating their own impromptu healthcare systems based on ancestral techniques and others have barricaded off their villages from the outside world in an effort to stem the flow of the virus.

In Peru, many Indigenous communities are turning to centuries-old medicines to fight back against the Coronavirus.

The Coronavirus has had a devastating impact on Peru – the country with the world’s highest per capita Covid-19 mortality rate. At particular risk is the nation’s large Indigenous community, who often lack proper access to education efforts and medical care. This has forced many Indigenous groups to find their own remedies.

In the Ucayali region, government rapid response teams deployed to a handful of Indigenous communities have found infection rates as high as 80% through antibody testing. Food and medicine donations have reached only a fraction of the population. Many say the only state presence they have seen is from a group responsible for collecting bodies of the dead.

At least one community, the Indigenous Shipibo from Peru’s Amazon region, have decided to rely on the wisdom of their ancestors. With hospitals far away, doctors stretch too thin and a lack of beds, many have accepted the alternative medicine.

In a report by the Associated Press, one villager, Mery Fasabi, speaks about gathering herbs, steeping them in boiling water and instructing her loved ones to breathe in the vapors. She also makes syrups of onion and ginger to help clear congested airways.

“We had knowledge about these plants, but we didn’t know if they’d really help treat COVID,” the teacher told the AP. “With the pandemic we are discovering new things.”

One of the plants the Shipibo are using is known locally as ‘matico.’ The plant has green leaves and brightly colored flowers. And although Fasabi admits that these ancestral remedies are by no means a cure, the holistic approach is proving successful. She says that “We are giving tranquility to our patients,” through words of encouragement and physical touch.

Even before the Coronavirus, Indigenous communities were at a greater risk for infectious diseases.

Indigenous peoples around the globe tend to be at higher risk from emerging infectious diseases compared to other populations. During the H1N1 pandemic in Canada in 2009, for example, aboriginal Canadians made up 16% of admissions to hospital, despite making up 3.4% of the population.

Covid-19 is no exception. In the US, one in every 2,300 indigenous Americans has died, compared to one in 3,600 white Americans.

Indigenous groups are particularly vulnerable to dying from Covid-19 because they often live days away from professional medical help. As of July 28, the disease had killed 1,108 indigenous people and there had been 27,517 recorded cases, with the majority in Brazil, according to data published by Red Eclesial Panamazonia (Repam).

Some communities are turning inward to survive COVID-19, barricading villages and growing their own food.

Despite the immense threat they face, Indigenous communities are fighting back.

“I am amazed to see the ways that indigenous peoples are stepping up to provide support where governments have not,” Tauli-Corpuz, a teacher at Mexico’s UNAM, told The Conversation. “They are providing PPE and sanitation, making their own masks, and ensuring that information on Covid-19 is available in local languages, and are distributing food and other necessities.”

They are also choosing to isolate. In Ecuador’s Siekopai nation, about 45 Indigenous elders, adults and children traveled deep into the forest to their ancestral heartland of Lagartococha to escape exposure to the Coronavirus, says the nation’s president Justino Piaguaje.

Despite their best efforts, many experts are extremely concerned for the survival of many Indigenous communities.

Credit: Ginebra Peña / Amazonian Alliance

They are already facing the ‘tipping point’ of ecological collapse due to increased threats of deforestation, fires, industrial extraction, agribusiness expansion and climate change,” Amazon Watch executive director Leila Salazar-Lopez told UNESCO of Amazonian Indigenous groups.

“Now, the pandemic has created one more crisis, and as each day passes, the risk of ethnocide becomes more real.”

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