Entertainment

We Ranked Instagram’s 17 Most Followed Latino Celebrities And Their Claims to Fame

Everyone wants to know who’s who in the Instagram (IG) universe. Don’t you? It’s no secret that celebrities usually top the list. So, here’s the lowdown on Instagram’s 17 most followed Latino Celebrities. 

J. Balvin

Instagram @jbalvin

Capturing hearts and tickling our ears is Colombian Reggaeton singer and chart-topping recording artist, J. Balvin. What’s more, all four singles from his album “La Familia” charted in Colombia’s top 10 and he won Premios Lo Nuestro Artist of the Year Award in 2016. Signed onto EMI Colombia in 2009, he grabbed audiences early on with his first single, “Ella Me Cautivó.” He has a whopping 24.9 million followers.

Nicky Jam

Twitter@NickyJamPR

Jam to this Latin Grammy Award Winner’s Reggaeton music and join his 25.9 million followers on Instagram.  Born in Boston to a Dominican mother and a Puerto Rican father, he has moved around quite a bit, first to Puerto Rico with his family at age 10 and is now living in Colombia. A great collaborator, if you’re a fan of Reggaeton, you have also heard him with other greats like Daddy Yankee (who also has an impressive 23.4 million IG followers).

Camila Cabello

Twitter@Camila_Cabello

“Havana” anyone? Camila Cabello, a Cuban-American singer with an enticing and exciting sound has 27.4 million followers. Bringing our hearts to Havana right along with her brought Cabello to her role in breaking barriers. In January of this year, she earned recognition for being the first woman in three years to make it to the No. 1 spot for her debut full-length album. She also reached Billboard’s top 100 in the same week.

Marina Ruy Barbosa

Twitter/Instagram@marinaruybarbosa


Multi-talented twenty-three-year-old Brazilian actress Marina Ruy Barbosa has 28.5 million followers. Known for her roles in “Total Dreamer,” “Seven Sins” and “Empire,”Barbosa was not ready to stop there. She adds author to her list of accomplishments. She has written a book: “Inspirações – uma seleção afetiva de reflexões e poemas” (Inspirations – an affective selection of reflection and poems). Her heritage is also one of renown. She is a descendant of the lawyer, poet and politician Ruy Barbosa.

Lele Pons

Twitter@lelepons

Do you remember Vine? If not, Lele Pons, a Venezuelan-American Internet Personality will bring you back.  She rose to fame on Vine but moved on to YouTube where she does comedy sketches. She also keeps people up-to-date with her goings-on through Instagram. She made the moves to these two social networks when Vine shut down. Continuing to garner attention for her acting, singing and dancing skills, she boasts 30.7 million followers.  Not done there, she hosts “La Voz…México.” She has also released her own music and co-authored a novel in 2016.

Luis Suarez

Twitter@LuisSuarez9

Playing for FC Barcelona and for the Uruguayan national team, Luis Suarez, an Uruguayan soccer player has 33.1 million followers. Suarez is Uruguay’s all-time leading goal-scorer. What an accomplishment! Not to overshadow his successes, but he is often considered a controversial player. He’s had several incidents landing him in hot water with the leagues. Despite that, it is evident that he wants to give back. Suarez is currently creating a football complex for recreational play in Uruguay. That way, aspiring soccer players can have ample access to playing space and equipment.

Bruna Marquezine

Twitter@brumarquezine

Let’s head back to Brazil to find another well-known celebrity coming from its ranks. Brazilian model and actress, Bruna Marquezine, has 33 million followers. An interesting tidbit is that, in honor of her grandmother, she chose the last name Marquezine for her public persona. Her renown comes from her roles in  “Women in Love,” “America” and “Helena’s Shadow.”

Marcelo Vieira Jr.

Twitter@Marcelo12Lovers

Wow! Brazil brings us even more to celebrate. Marcelo Vieiera Jr. is another Brazilian soccer player with quite the IG following, 33.5 million. He is with Spanish club Real Madrid and the Brazil national team.

Maluma

Twitter/Instagram@maluma

A tender and sweet tenor, Colombian Reggaeton Singer, Maluma, has 36.8 million followers on Instagram.  His catchy tunes bring us his big hits “Obsesión” and “Miss Independent.” They brought him a coveted nomination for Latin Grammy in 2013.

Ronaldo de Assis Moreira (Ronaldinho)

Twitter@10Ronaldhino

It’s all in the family. A key member of the 2002 team that won the World Cup, Ronaldhino carries on his family’s legacy of soccer players. In 2003, he joined FC Barcelona and won FIFA World Player of the Year awards in both 2004 and 2005.  With these great accomplishments behind him, he moved to AC Milan in 2008. Sadly, he has not had the same level of success as he did with Barcelona. Ronaldhino still has a great following. There are 39.2 million of them on Instagram.

Shakira

Twitter@shakira

“Hips Don’t Lie” and neither will we when we tell you that Colombian pop singer Shakira counts 55 million Instagram users as her followers. Along with the stand-out hit we mentioned above, she’s most famous for “Whenever, Wherever”. A powerhouse on the stage and off, she has received multiple Grammy, Latin Grammy and American Music Awards.  Not to mention that she has the highest number of album sales for Colombian artists, coming in at around 70 million.

Demi Lovato

Twitter@ddlovato

An impressive count, Demi Lovato has 70.6 million followers on Instagram.  That big purple dinosaur, Barney, helped many actors and singers get their start. Demi is one of them. Her acting career began during childhood on “Barney and Friends,” “Sonny with a Chance” and in the film “Camp Rock.” Moving on to the music industry, her debut album was “Don’t Forget” in 2008. Follow-up albums were “Unbroken,” “Confident” and “Tell Me You Love Me.” Her hit singles are “Skyscraper” and “Sorry Not Sorry.” She is a tireless advocate for LGBTQ associations like GLAAD.

Jennifer Lopez

Twitter @JLo

J.Lo has 82.6 million Instagram followers. People have been following her long before Instagram was around. She started  as a dancer on “In Living Color.” However, it was the film “Selena” that gave her her big break. Setting her sights on the music industry her voice and energy had us hooked. Most of her songs and albums reached the Top 200 charts was the recipient of numerous music awards.  She is now involved with television projects like American Idol, Shades of Blue and World of Dance.

Leo Messi

Twitter @WeAreMessi

We count another soccer player among our most followed celebrities, this time coming out of Argentina. Leo Messi has 102 million followers and plays for the  FC Barcelona club as well as the Argentine national team. His athleticism is highly appreciated as evidenced by the high pay he receives. Messi is the second highest paid soccer player and third-highest paid athlete in the world.  He uses that money for good by working as a children’s activist. His philanthropical foundation, the Leo Messi Foundation, provides opportunities to disadvantaged youth.

Enejota Neymar Jr.

Instagram/Twitter @Neymarjr

A star soccer player, Enejota Neymar Jr. has 106 million followers. Clearly, his popularity isn’t limited to the field. Hailing from Brazil, he joined Santos FC in 2009 at age 17, winning four Player of the Year Awards in a row while playing for them.  All before he turned 21. He plays for both Brazil and Paris Saint-Germain. He also has a 7-year old son.

Selena Gomez

Twitter @_selenagomezecu

We’ve finally arrived at the #1 most followed celebrity on Instagram. At 144 million followers is actress and pop singer Selena Gomez. From her role on “Barney and Friends” and her success with Disney shows to amazing musical accomplishments, it’s no wonder there’s so much interest in her. Gomez’s first breakout/starring role with Disney Channel was on “Wizards of Waverly Place.” She also acted in the film “Spring Breakers”. Her musical fame comes from her debut album 2009: Kiss and Tell and her follow-up album Revival. Ensuring people learn about and understand Lupus, she’s gone public with her own battle.

ICE Is Taking Advantage Of Migrants Who Can’t Read Or Write In Their Court Proceedings

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ICE Is Taking Advantage Of Migrants Who Can’t Read Or Write In Their Court Proceedings

Sandy Huffaker / Sandy Huffaker

Last summer, images of undocumented immigrant children went viral. These images didn’t show them crying, or being taken away from their parents. These children were pictured alone in court. The nameless children had no one by their side, no one to represent them, and had no clue what was going on, despite the fact that they were there trying to seek asylum. In some cases, these children wore headphones as a means to translate what the judge was saying. However, given that they were just children, the translation was almost useless. Reports are now servicing that immigration officials are using the language barrier as a means to keep them out of the U.S. 

An op-ed, written by a volunteer at the border, states that asylum-seeking immigrants cannot read or write in English or in their native tongue and immigration officials are taking advantage of that.

Emily Reed, a recent grad student from Barnard University, wrote an op-ed in The Washington Post that stated she witnessed this manipulation from immigration officials against illiterate undocumented people. Reed was at the border in Texas volunteering with classmates at the South Texas Family Residential Center volunteering with the Dilley Pro Bono Project when she witnessed this manipulation. 

“U.S. Customs and Border Protection often conveniently exploit asylum seekers who cannot read. Along with an unfamiliarity with our deliberately complex immigration system, the illiteracy of Central American migrants, especially women, facilitates the deportation of parents and separation of families,” Reed wrote. She added, “By manipulating illiterate refugees who often unwittingly sign away their rights, the U.S. government is violating the basic tenets of the internationally recognized and protected right to seek asylum.” 

Reed added that her volunteer program with the legal center provided Spanish documents to the migrant families, but they couldn’t under that either.

“Simple translation is not enough,” she wrote. “The Dilley Pro Bono Project provides documents in Spanish, but even this paperwork was difficult for many migrant women to understand. Many women I helped to fill out paperwork struggled simply to write their children’s birth dates.”

The migrant families are being rushed within the court and legal process, which in turn, is causing deportation to happen a lot faster.

Last year, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) reported that the haste paperwork at the border made it possible for immigration officials to rush and deport undocumented immigrants. The ACLU stated this process should not be rushed because people need to take their time and understand what is going on and what it is that they’re signing. 

“This waiting period is crucial to ensure that parents have an opportunity to make an informed decision about whether to fight their own removal cases, leave their children (who may have their own asylum claims) behind in the United States, or make some other decision,” the ACLU stated lasted year. “In short, families will be making life-altering decisions after months of traumatic separation — and the fact that the government is trying to shortchange them a matter of days to do so is galling.”

A New York Times report showed that 58,000 asylum seekers are currently stuck in Mexico under Trump’s policy because they’re awaiting asylum hearings.

The backlog for these asylum hearings is up to six to eight months, and when they’re ready for their hearing the majority of them won’t understand what needs to be done. This is why they need proper representation, and a patient legal system so they comprehend what is being asked of them and what the next steps are. 

What makes this matter even worse is that there’s not enough legal representation for each family unit, or individual, at the border. 

Last year, it was very apparent that there were not enough lawyers or legal help for undocumented immigrants at the border, and this year there’s even more undocumented people awaiting help and attempting to seek asylum. There people like Reed who want to help asylum seekers, but it’s not as easy as they might think. 

“People see the crisis happening, and they want to do something right now, which is great. But when we explain that this is a long-term fight, and we need your long-term commitment. That’s when people sort of back off.” Zenén Jaimes Pérez, the communications director at the Texas Civil Rights Project, told Huffington Post last year. 

If, however, you are willing to put in the time, or you’re interested in learning more about how you can provide legal help, or assist legal teams at the border, please reach out to: the South Texas Pro Bono Asylum Representation Project (“ProBAR”); the Immigration Justice Project (“IJP”); the ACLU of Texas; and RAICES.

READ: Selena Gomez Announces New Netflix Series ‘Living Undocumented’

New Report Confirms That Trump’s Border Wall Is Jeopardizing Native American History And Sensitive Environments

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New Report Confirms That Trump’s Border Wall Is Jeopardizing Native American History And Sensitive Environments

Agh! Every time we read or hear the words “Border Wall” our stomach ties up in a knot and we whisper “Y ahora qué se trae este pinche gringo?”. But well, being aware of the repercussions that the Border Wall could have is part of being socially and civically responsible. Being informed is what makes us make better choices when it comes to politics, and next year is a preeeeetty big year when it comes to deciding what the future holds not only for the United States, but for the world at large.  

The Trump Border Wall is just the “gift” that keeps on giving, isn’t it?

Credit: Giphy. @luisprado-0557

We have all discussed the impact that the proposed Border Wall (which seems very close to becoming a reality, particularly if Trump wants to secure a second term by appealing to his core voters) could have on social, cultural and political terms. We know that it will make an already tense border situation even worse, and that the US vs THEM mentality that some hold could get even uglier. This, of course, can lead to further instances if vitriolic racism and violence (vigilante groups will feel vindicated). But as the months go by and the Border Wall seems to become a reality, new findings are discovering its impact in other spheres… 

22 archeological sites in Arizona could be decimated by the Border Wall

Credit: Instagram. @aztassociation

The Border Wall will be constructed right through the Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in Arizona. The National Park Service commissioned a report to assess the impact that the construction could have on 22 archeological sites in the Park. And the results are alarming. 

The Roosevelt Reservation would be particularly impacted.

Credit: Instagram. @
And the threat is imminent. Contractors have basically set shop and started to build fences around the place. The exact extent of the building plans have not been disclosed, not even to National Park authorities. As Andrew Veech, a member of the National Park Service’s Intermountain Region Archaeology Program, wrote in the report: “Precise design plans for this expanded border infrastructure have been left to the discretion of the contractors, and no details about the building project(s) have been furnished to the National Park Service”. This is just plain wrong, as any efforts to preempt potential problems are impossible. This area is tricky, as it is made up from federal, state, tribal, and private lands. 

The past is being erased.

Credit: Instagram. @pnolbert

The National Park holds invaluable archeological assets left behind by the original indigenous owners of the land. As the Tucson Sentinel reports: “One site located near the Sonoyta River includes artifacts scattered throughout, including dozens of stone artifacts, stone fragments, a “hammerstone,” pieces of broken pots known as sherds, as well as shells presumably from the Gulf of California that were probably used during the Hohokam Period, between 1150 to 1400″. Researchers are still putting the pieces together to unearth the particularities of the human groups that first inhabited what is now the United States-Mexico border, which is key for the identity of a cultural formation. Archeologists argue that these 22 sites yield important information about Native-American populations before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores. 

And the Border Wall will also have an environmental impact.

Credit: Instagram. @arizonasfamily

Geopolitical borders are a human construct, so flora and fauna don’t really care where a country starts and another ends. This is why the environmental impact of a monstrous Border Wall would be nothing short of apocalyptic for Arizonian environment and indigenous communities. As reported by The New York Times: “The unearthing of the area surrounding the barriers and the installation of lights on the wall will devastate wildlife and contaminate cultural lands”. The scenario is dire for animal and plant species in the area, as a former worker of the National Park told NYT: “‘The lights that will be installed on top of the wall, blasted into the wilderness, the ground water being sucked up — it’s more than just a border wall. All of these activities will just increase the desertification of the region”. Just look at the beauty of this landscape, the millenary cacti, the shrubs sucking up water to survive: are we really willing for it all to just become a wasteland?

Trump’s wall would also decimate indigenous populations in Arizona.

Credit: Instagram. @oodhampodcaster

Let us not forget that this area, as happens with long stretches of the border, has been home to Native-Americans for centuries. But their future is at stake. As The New York Times states: “The Organ Pipe Cactus Monument is sandwiched between the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge and the Tohono O’odham Reservation. Leaders of the Tohono O’odham say the border wall would virtually split the indigenous community in half”. And really, is there anyone more American than the very first, original Americans?