Entertainment

The Actor Who Voiced Miguel In ‘Coco’ Is In A Short Film About Child Detention Centers In The US

Immigration detention, in particular for minors, is still a heated topic in the U.S. Despite the end of family separation, there are still hundreds of children detained because of it. Even worse, there’s a startling 13,000 children in immigration detention centers right now. Most of the kids have crossed over to the U.S. alone, without their parents, The New York Times reports.

Artists tell stories from moments in history like this and, as such, the immigration crisis is being told. Filmmaker Daniel Sawka made a short film “Icebox” about the detention of minors in the U.S. That same short film of 33 seconds is being extended into a feature film to further tell the story about one young boy’s tale in a detention center. The film was presented at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

“Icebox” is a short film starring Anthony Gonzalez, who played the beloved Miguel in Pixar’s “Coco.”

CREDIT: Instagram/@anthonygonzalez_official

The film is about a young boy, played by Gonzalez, who becomes trapped inside “America’s rigid immigration process.” You see the young boy struggle to understand what is happening as he is manhandled by immigration officers.

The film touches on gang violence in Honduras and the reason so many minors are being forced to flee their country.

CREDIT: Gracie Films

Gonzalez plays Oscar who’s being held in a detention center, otherwise known as an ice box. The detention centers are referred too as ice boxes because they are kept at very cold temperatures.

According to the film’s website, Oscar is trying to gain control of his life.

CREDIT: Gracie Films

It is hard to tell what brought Oscar to the U.S. It might seem like he is an unaccompanied minor, however, unaccompanied minors are being created by the administration separating families. It is impossible to tell definitively if his parents were with him at the border until the movie is released.

The film was almost an Oscar contender for film’s released in 2017, which is the same time “Coco” was released. The film is now getting more attention because of what’s going on in our country.

The film is now going to be a feature film thanks to legendary writer, director, and producer, by James L. Brooks. He said it was this short film that opened his eyes to what was going on right here in the U.S.

It’s unclear if Gonzalez will play Oscar once again, but “Icebox” director Daniel Sawka is involved in the feature film version. He says it was his own story of immigration that made him want to do the film.

“For generations on my father’s side, people have been forced to migrate and relocate and find new homes,” Sawka said in an interview with Business Insider. “It’s something I never experienced, but I was brought up on these stories and I wanted to find out more. Understand it better.”


READ: The Trump Administration Is Quietly Trying To Undo The Flores Agreement To Indefinitely Detain Children

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Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

Entertainment

Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

Badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna has never been afraid to speak her mind. She’s a woman who speaks up for issues she cares about and people listen to her. That’s why so many love her – present company included.

The ‘Umbrella’ singer, how has been kind of off the musical radar as of late, spoke out in a new interview with British Vogue and she had a few things to say about her upcoming music, where she’s been living, and her relationship with migrant communities.

Rihanna continues to use her platform and reach of over 200 million followers across social media to bring awareness to social issues that are important to her.

Credit: Chesnot / WireImage

In an interview with Vogue, the creator of “Fenty Beauty” explained feeling empathy with Mexicans and Latinos who are discriminated against in the United States, since she says that she knows how it feels to be on the end of discriminatory policies.

“The Guyanese are like the Mexicans of Barbados,” she said. “So I identify—and that’s why I really relate and empathize with Mexican people or Latino people, who are discriminated against in America. I know what it feels like to have the immigration come into your home in the middle of the night and drag people out.”

Similarly, she recalled the times in which she suffered and the difficulties her and mother experienced when they emigrated from Barbados.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna was born Robyn Rihanna Fenty in St. Michael, Barbados to a Guyanese mother and Barbadian father.

In the Vogue interview, she added: “Let’s say I know what that fight is like. I have witnessed it, I have been there. I think I was eight years old when I had to live that in the middle of the night. So I know how daunting it is for a child, and if my father had been dragged out of my house, I can guarantee you that my life would have been a disaster.”

In that same Vogue interview, Rihanna confessed to something that few people outsider her inner circle even knew.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

She explained that in recent years she has become a bit of a nomad, having a house in London, Paris, Barbados and Mexico, where she feels more relaxed.

“I just love Mexico. I really need to do my DNA test,” she jokingly told Afua Hirsch of Vogue. Perhaps she was an agave plant, in a past life, she pondered.

Rihanna has been vocal about immigrant rights in the past and takes great pride in her origins.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

The Grammy Award winning singer and entrepreneur has very publicly thrown shade at President Trump over his cruel immigration policies.

Rihanna, who’s been appointed as the ambassador of her native country Barbados, is no stranger to political matters. She sent a cease-and-desist letter to President Donald Trump in early November after he played her music at one of his rallies. She also rejected the opportunity to perform during the Super Bowl LIII in February 2019 out of protest for Colin Kaepernick.

Plus, in an interview with The Cut last year about the word ‘immigrant’, she said: “For me, it’s a prideful word. To know that you can come from humble beginnings and just take over whatever you want to, dominate at whatever you put your mind to. The world becomes your oyster, and there’s no limit. Wherever I go, except for Barbados, I’m an immigrant. I think people forget that a lot of times.”

Woman Reunited With Her Parents Because Of Her Son And The Touching Moment Was Caught On Video

Entertainment

Woman Reunited With Her Parents Because Of Her Son And The Touching Moment Was Caught On Video

The immigrant experience in the U.S. is a plethora of stories with different endings. One common storyline in the current immigration crisis is the separation of families. A viral video of Twitter is showing the immigrant experience in a touching and hopeful way.

Luis Cortes Romero, a DACA recipient in California according to his Twitter bio, posted a video of his mother being reunited with her parents for the first time in 30 years. The video starts with a woman being asked to come into another room. When she rounds the corner, she stops dead in her tracks as she tries to take int eh scene before her. After 30 years, she finally got to see her parents again.

Romero is an attorney and, according to the tweet, he always vowed to bring his grandparents to the U.S. to see their daughter. The moment was captured on video and you can feel the emotions coming through the screen.

Romero briefly described the challenges he faced while getting his grandparents visas to come to the U.S.

Credit: @LCortesRomero / Twitter

A parent’s love is something so special and unconditional. Despite his grandfather being deaf, mute, and illiterate, his grandparents took trips by bus every time they tried for a visa. It took five tries before the couple finally had their visas approved for a visit to the U.S.

The family even got to celebrate his birthday while he was visiting.

Credit: @LCortesRomero / Twitter

The smile on his mom’s face says it all. Imagine having to go 30 years without seeing your parents because of your choice to immigrate or a better life. So many immigrants sacrifice their families, friends, and everything they know in order to achieve a better life for them and their families. The video shows the emotional toll that the immigration experience can take on a family.

People on social media are showering Romero with so much respect.

Credit: @serrrg_ / Twitter

The Twitter video shows so much love and family unity. It is an intimate look into a life so many Americans will never know or experience. One of overwhelming joy following decades of unfathomable sadness and separation.

The cries from the children seeing their parents are something so many of us can relate to.

Credit: @Maryem77104169 / Twitter

Whether or not you have separated from your parents for decades, it is easy to understand the longing for your parents. There is nothing more comforting than being able to see your parents when something goes wrong. There are so many times as adults that we need to rely on our parents, whether we like to acknowledge it or not.

The separation of families is a moment in American history that we will have to face.

Credit: @IamNurseTrish / Twitter

Immigration advocates have called the separation of families at the southern border is damaging. The psychological damage to the children being taken by their parents is devastating.

Way to go, Luis.

Thank you for being such an exceptional son.

READ: This Video Of A Mexicana And Her Parents Reuniting After 23 Years Is A Reminder That Conservatives Have Immigration Wrong