Entertainment

Becky G Gets Called Out For Cultural Appropriation And Latinx Twitter Users Have Thoughts

The hashtag #HowDoMexicansTalk is trending on Twitter as social media users squabble about Becky G and J-Hope’s new song “Chicken Noodle Soup”. The trilingual song —an homage to the early 2000’s hit by DJ Webstar and Young B (who now goes by Bianca Bonnie), featuring AG aka The Voice of Harlem— sent Twitter into a frenzied debate on cultural appropriation and whether or not Becky G is putting on a ‘blaccent’.

The “Chicken Noodle Soup” remake sparked a heated conversation around cultural appropriation on Twitter, and the Latinx community had stuff to say. 

The much-anticipated collab between Becky G and K-pop singer J-Hope, resulted in a big Billboard Social 50 gain for Becky and has racked up over 50 million views in just 5 days. The 2006 hit remake even started a whole dance challenge after J-Hope shared a video of himself recreating the choreography on TikTok, millions of fans followed suit, posting their own videos with the hashtag #CNSChallenge. But the new “Chicken Noodle Soup” also sparked a heated conversation on cultural appropriation in the Latinx community online.

It’s not the first time BTS’ J-Hope is involved in a debate about appropriating other cultures.

credit instagram @bts_jhope

J-Hope himself has been the subject of criticism for cultural appropriation around one of the hairstyles he sported towards the end of the video. In most of the video of “Chicken Noodle Soup”, J-Hope rocks his natural hair with blonde highlights, but during the second half, he wears a twisted hairstyle that many believe resembled dreadlocks. It’s not the first time the BTS star finds himself involved in debates of this nature —especially given K-pop’s already fraught history with appropriating black culture. 

One twitter used called the song “anti-black” and accused Becky G of using a ‘blaccent’.

credit twitter @rudeboiluna

On this occasion however, the subject of debate and heated comments was ‘Sin Pijama’ singer Becky G. One outspoken account on black Latinx issues called the song “anti-black” and accused the Mexican-American singer of using a “Caribbean blaccent.” “La Mala” or @rudeboiluna, questioned Becky G’s Spanish accent in a tweet that went viral: “Non-black people of color cannot survive without appropriating black diaspora,” she wrote.

Other twitter users were quick to disagree with “La mala” and so, the rhetorical question ‘How do Mexicans talk’ started to trend as part of the debate, questioning whether there’s only one ‘correct’ way for Mexicans to speak Spanish. When asked, “La mala” responded: “like a Mexican. tf.”

Thousands of commenters asked “How are we supposed to sound in order to be legitimized as Mexican-American?”

The hashtag was a response to Luna’s argument that all Mexicans should sound the same given that Mexico has a population of nearly 130 million and is a multicultural nation that greatly identifies as ‘mestizo’ given that it’s composed of many ethnic groups complete with their own different languages. Another user asked “How do you think Mexicans sound? Do you think we [go] buRRito and tAcO all the time?”  Luna replied, perhaps in poor taste, perhaps just making light of her own ignorance, “yea lol.”

credit Twitter @jin_butterfly

@rudeboiluna’s account has since been suspended following the heated tweets on behalf of BTS’ loyal army and the Mexican community who defended their views. Thousands of Latinx commenters chimed into the argument, a debate that greatly asked: “How are we supposed to sound in order to be legitimized as Mexican-American?”. The fact is that no one’s ethnic identity needs to be legitimized by anyone. No one has the right to invalidate another person’s cultural identity or expressions. 

“You don’t look Latina” or “You don’t even speak Spanish, “are some remarks that second- and third-generation-born American Latinos hear way too often. 

credit Twitter @somexicans

Becky G is part of a troupe of Latinx artists who have been questioned for not “looking” Latino enough, or “sounding” Latino enough. The actor and singer, has shut down the ignorant claims many times before, most famously in an essay published on Popsugar.com: 

“You don’t look Latina” or “You don’t even speak Spanish.” These are the remarks that us second- and third-generation-born American Latinos often hear. The truth is, the lack of language knowledge does not lessen the Latin blood running through our veins or the stories our last names carry. There is no “look” to the passion Latinos carry within them. Although my Spanish is flawed and I didn’t grow up in Mexico, I take pride in my roots. My family’s history and the fact that all the traditions and morals passed down have shaped me to be who I am today is what it means to be a second-generation-born Mexican-American for me.”

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A Black Student From Louisiana State Accused Three Police Offers Of Unzipping His Pants To ‘Look’ For Drugs

Things That Matter

A Black Student From Louisiana State Accused Three Police Offers Of Unzipping His Pants To ‘Look’ For Drugs

Anadolu Agency / Getty

Abuse of power by police is alive and well in Baton Rouge and in urgent need of being stopped.

Three police officers from the Louisiana capital have been put on paid administrative leave after accusations of harassment were issued by a local Black college football freshman. According to the student, Koy Moore a freshman who plays a wide receiver at Louisiana State University, the three police officers unzipped his pants and confiscated his phone to prevent him from recording the incident.

In a post shared to Twitter on Saturday, Moore claimed that the officers “violated” him in an attempt to search him for drugs and weapons while screaming “Where’s your gun?”

Koy Moore claims that he was violated by three Baton Rouge police officers.

“I was violated numerous times even going as far as trying to unzip my pants in search of a weapon that I repeatedly told them I did not have,” Moore wrote in the post. “As I tried to go live for video documentation of the harassment, they snatched my phone. I could have lost my life, and I know for a fact nothing would’ve happened to the guys who did it.” 

In his post, More questioned what could have actually happened to him if he hadn’t told the officers that he was a student at LSU.

In response to his tweet, LSU faculty and staff have supported him. Ed Orgeron, LSU’s football coach even commented on the incident in a post to Twitter.“While I cannot comment on the investigation, what I can say is that we must work collectively to embrace our differences,” Orgeron he wrote. “We have to listen, learn, and come together to combat social injustice and racism if we are to create a safer and more equitable society for all.”

The official LSU Twitter account retweeted the coach’s post writing that they shared in “the sentiment shared by Coach Ed Orgeron.”

The three officers, who have been placed on paid leave, have yet to be identified to the public. Still, Chief Murphy Paul of the Baton Rouge Police Department said his department had been in contact with Moore and that an investigation is currently underway.

“We appreciate Mr. Moore bringing this incident to our attention,” Paul said in a statement. “As in every case, we will be collecting all available evidence and conducting interviews. Accountability and transparency are critical in building trust with the community. I pledge a thorough investigation into this complaint.”

The incident in Baton Rouge underlines that major issue in modern American politics. 

During the summer, after Breonna Taylor and George Floyd were murdered by police, Baton Rouge took part in the nationwide protests.

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Karol G, Bad Bunny, And Cardi B Lead AMA Nominations

Entertainment

Karol G, Bad Bunny, And Cardi B Lead AMA Nominations

Amy Sussman / BBMA2020 / Getty Images for dcp

The American Music Awards included three new categories to highlight Latin music stars. The nominations are officially out and here are the Latinos who are nominated for awards at the AMAs.

Cardi B

Not even a pandemic could keep Cardi B down. The rapper had an amazing year when it comes to her music career, especially with the release of “WAP.” Therefore, it should not be a surprise that Cardi B has been nominated for Collaboration of the Year for “WAP,” Favorite Female Artist – Rap/Hip Hop, and Favorite Song – Rap/Hip Hop for “WAP.”

Bad Bunny

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CONFIEN EN MI 🌜✨💫

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The Puerto Rican artist is one of the most beloved members of the Latin music world. He has been nominated for the most awards of all male Latin music artist with four nominations. Bad Bunny is up for Best Male Artist – Latin, Favorite Album – Latin for “Las que no iban de salir” and “YHLQMDLG,” and Favorite Latin Song for “Vete.”

J Balvin

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Los Angeles acá seguimos !! Pa Lante !!

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J Balvin will always be an important part of Latin music and the AMA nominations show why. The Colombian artist has been nominated for Favorite Male Artist – Latin and Favorite Song – Latin for “RITMO (Bad Boys for Life).”

Ozuna

Ozuna was the center of a controversial couple of years but his music career has always been strong. This year, he is going against Bad Bunny and J Balvin for Favorite Male Artist – Latin.

Becky G

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Hoy a las 3PM PT 😘 #NoDrama

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The Inglewood-native continues to slay with her incredible music. The AMAs have taken notice and the singer is up for Favorite Female Artist – Latin.

KAROL G

KAROL G is one musician that will definitely be around for a long time to come. The Colombian singer and songwriter has made a major name for herself and landed two AMA nominations. KAROL G is up for both Favorite Female Artist – Latin and Favorite Song – Latin for “Tusa.”

Rosalía

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🖤

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There is a lot of controversy about Rosalía and her inclusion in Latin music. While she does sing in Spanish, people have an issue with her being considered Latin music. However, the AMAs nominated Rosalía for Favorite Female Artist – Latin.

Anuel AA

Anuel AA rounds out the list of nominees for the AMAs. The singer is nominated for Favorite Album – Latin for “Emmanuel.”

READ: Karol G Use Of A Problematic Message To Make A BLM Statement Is A Reminder That Y’all Need To Listen Before They Speak

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