Entertainment

Becky G Gets Called Out For Cultural Appropriation And Latinx Twitter Users Have Thoughts

The hashtag #HowDoMexicansTalk is trending on Twitter as social media users squabble about Becky G and J-Hope’s new song “Chicken Noodle Soup”. The trilingual song —an homage to the early 2000’s hit by DJ Webstar and Young B (who now goes by Bianca Bonnie), featuring AG aka The Voice of Harlem— sent Twitter into a frenzied debate on cultural appropriation and whether or not Becky G is putting on a ‘blaccent’.

The “Chicken Noodle Soup” remake sparked a heated conversation around cultural appropriation on Twitter, and the Latinx community had stuff to say. 

The much-anticipated collab between Becky G and K-pop singer J-Hope, resulted in a big Billboard Social 50 gain for Becky and has racked up over 50 million views in just 5 days. The 2006 hit remake even started a whole dance challenge after J-Hope shared a video of himself recreating the choreography on TikTok, millions of fans followed suit, posting their own videos with the hashtag #CNSChallenge. But the new “Chicken Noodle Soup” also sparked a heated conversation on cultural appropriation in the Latinx community online.

It’s not the first time BTS’ J-Hope is involved in a debate about appropriating other cultures.

credit instagram @bts_jhope

J-Hope himself has been the subject of criticism for cultural appropriation around one of the hairstyles he sported towards the end of the video. In most of the video of “Chicken Noodle Soup”, J-Hope rocks his natural hair with blonde highlights, but during the second half, he wears a twisted hairstyle that many believe resembled dreadlocks. It’s not the first time the BTS star finds himself involved in debates of this nature —especially given K-pop’s already fraught history with appropriating black culture. 

One twitter used called the song “anti-black” and accused Becky G of using a ‘blaccent’.

credit twitter @rudeboiluna

On this occasion however, the subject of debate and heated comments was ‘Sin Pijama’ singer Becky G. One outspoken account on black Latinx issues called the song “anti-black” and accused the Mexican-American singer of using a “Caribbean blaccent.” “La Mala” or @rudeboiluna, questioned Becky G’s Spanish accent in a tweet that went viral: “Non-black people of color cannot survive without appropriating black diaspora,” she wrote.

Other twitter users were quick to disagree with “La mala” and so, the rhetorical question ‘How do Mexicans talk’ started to trend as part of the debate, questioning whether there’s only one ‘correct’ way for Mexicans to speak Spanish. When asked, “La mala” responded: “like a Mexican. tf.”

Thousands of commenters asked “How are we supposed to sound in order to be legitimized as Mexican-American?”

The hashtag was a response to Luna’s argument that all Mexicans should sound the same given that Mexico has a population of nearly 130 million and is a multicultural nation that greatly identifies as ‘mestizo’ given that it’s composed of many ethnic groups complete with their own different languages. Another user asked “How do you think Mexicans sound? Do you think we [go] buRRito and tAcO all the time?”  Luna replied, perhaps in poor taste, perhaps just making light of her own ignorance, “yea lol.”

credit Twitter @jin_butterfly

@rudeboiluna’s account has since been suspended following the heated tweets on behalf of BTS’ loyal army and the Mexican community who defended their views. Thousands of Latinx commenters chimed into the argument, a debate that greatly asked: “How are we supposed to sound in order to be legitimized as Mexican-American?”. The fact is that no one’s ethnic identity needs to be legitimized by anyone. No one has the right to invalidate another person’s cultural identity or expressions. 

“You don’t look Latina” or “You don’t even speak Spanish, “are some remarks that second- and third-generation-born American Latinos hear way too often. 

credit Twitter @somexicans

Becky G is part of a troupe of Latinx artists who have been questioned for not “looking” Latino enough, or “sounding” Latino enough. The actor and singer, has shut down the ignorant claims many times before, most famously in an essay published on Popsugar.com: 

“You don’t look Latina” or “You don’t even speak Spanish.” These are the remarks that us second- and third-generation-born American Latinos often hear. The truth is, the lack of language knowledge does not lessen the Latin blood running through our veins or the stories our last names carry. There is no “look” to the passion Latinos carry within them. Although my Spanish is flawed and I didn’t grow up in Mexico, I take pride in my roots. My family’s history and the fact that all the traditions and morals passed down have shaped me to be who I am today is what it means to be a second-generation-born Mexican-American for me.”

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“Sister, Sister” Actress Tia Mowry Broke Down In Tears Describing A Racist Incident She Experienced As A Teen

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“Sister, Sister” Actress Tia Mowry Broke Down In Tears Describing A Racist Incident She Experienced As A Teen

CBS Television Distribution

Back in the 90s, Tia and Tamera Mowry were experiencing the height of their fame while on the hit show “Sister, Sister.” The series which followed Tia and Tamera as Tia Landry and Tamera Campbell saw two actors play the part of two identical twins separated at birth and then accidentally reunited in their teens. It won several Emmys and Kids’ Choice Awards and cemented itself as essential Black TV. As a result, the twin sisters scored roles on other series, movies, and all kinds of media attention. And not for a lack of racist incidents that attempted to hold them back

Recently, Tia opened up about her experience as a Black teen actor in the 90s and shared a story that clearly still hurts her heart.

Speaking to Entertainment Tonight, Tia shared that she and her sister were once rejected from appearing in a teen magazine cover because of their skin color.

Speaking about the incident, Tia recalled how she’d been subjected to racism when she was a teen on the show and attempting to be on the cover of a popular magazine at the time.

“It was around Sister, Sister days. The show was extremely popular. We were beating — like in the ratings — Friends around that time,” Tia said. “So, my sister and I wanted to be on the cover of this very popular magazine at the time — it was a teenage magazine. We were told that we couldn’t be on the cover of the magazine because we were Black and we would not sell.”

The actress teared up as she went onto recall that “Here I am as an adult and, wow, it still affects me, how someone could demean your value because of the color of your skin,” she said. “I will never forget that. I wish I would have spoken up. I wish I would have said something then. I wish I would have had the courage to speak out and say that isn’t right.”

Years later Tia says she has used that moment to drive her in raising her two children.

Tia (who is a mother to Cree, 9, and Cairo, 2) says that “to this day, I’m always telling my beautiful brown-skinned girl that she is beautiful.”

“What I’ve done with my children is [reading] books,” she explained to People. “You can read incredible books to your children about Rosa Parks, about Martin Luther King Jr. — pivotal people that had a huge impact within the movement.”

“The other thing is through television, especially during this time,” she went onto explain. “I was just having my children watch a whole bunch of [things] that starred a lot of African American actors, and one of them is [TheWiz. You had Michael Jackson, Diana Ross. It was just such a great story. And my son … he loved it, [and] it’s important.”

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New Poll Finds That Young Latino Voters Consider “Racial and Ethnic Social Equality” the Most Important Issue This Election

Things That Matter

New Poll Finds That Young Latino Voters Consider “Racial and Ethnic Social Equality” the Most Important Issue This Election

In a poll of  638 young Latino voters, aged 18-34, conducted by BuzzFeed News in conjunction with Telemundo, the results found that the most pressing topics on the minds of young Latino voters was “racial and ethnic social equality”–an issue that 62.7% of the demographic considers the most urgent this election. And that’s not all.

The illuminating survey revealed that 55.8% of young Latino voters had participated someway in supporting the Black Lives Matter movement.

They expressed their support through physically demonstrating on the streets or other forms of activism like donating or boycotting. According to their responses, it was the fervor and intensity of the Black Lives Matter movement that has fueled their fire to vote. 

Although 60% of young Latino voters have committed to voting for Biden, 19% still say they will support President Trump come November. This response is surprising to some, considering that President Trump is almost universally considered the most anti-Hispanic, anti-immigration U.S. President in recent history. 

via Getty Images

While the passion and social activism of young Latinos is exciting, the lack of enthusiasm for Presidential candidate Joe Biden is cause for concern.

After all, as Univision anchor Jorge Ramos, put it in a New York Times opinion piece: “There is no route to the White House without the support of Latinos.” 

The poll also revealed Latinos’ overwhelming belief that there is no unifying political figure in the Latino community. When asked to name a politician who “goes out of their way to support their community,” the leading response was “Nobody”. Participants then listed Vice President Joe Biden, Senator Bernie Sanders, and Representative Alexandria Ocasio Cortez as second choices, each politician gaining 6% of the participants’ votes. 

“It’s heartbreaking,” said executive director of the group Alliance for Youth Action, Sarah Audelo, to NBC News.

We can’t have so many young Latinos disconnected from the process because they don’t feel part of it.”

Ramos described the tiresome election-year scramble to secure the Latino vote through cringey attempts at speaking Spanish and dropping in on Latino community events as “Christopher Columbus syndrome”. “It’s such an open and flagrant display of opportunism,” he wrote.

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