Entertainment

“Grey’s Anatomy” Celebrated Dia De Los Muertos And I Cried The Entire Time

For the past 15 seasons, I’ve been watching “Grey’s Anatomy” religiously. The show’s dramatic life-or-death plots, not to mention their love stories, has drawn in me for years and I love it to pieces.

However, I was super heartbroken when actress Sara Ramirez, who played Callie Torres, left the show. She was the only featured Latina who brought some of my culture to this show.

It’s only been recently, in the last year or so that they’ve taken on some issues close to my heart. In one episode last season, they focused on a doctor that had DACA status. She, the only Latina on the show, had to unfortunately leave the country because she was undocumented.

Last night, “Grey’s Anatomy” focused their episode on my favorite holiday: Día de los Muertos.

CREDIT: Grey’s Anatomy / ABC

While the show always deals with patients suffering from all kinds of health issues, the doctors embraced Día de los Muertos thanks to a little girl that needed surgery.

The episode titled “Flowers Grow Out of My Grave” featured a little girl named Flor, who’s entire family stayed in her hospital room to give her support while she prepared for surgery.

The show typically makes me cry, but seeing this Latino family celebrate Día de los Muertos on prime-time TV was too much!

In the clip above, Flor’s family is playing music and singing the classic song “El ultimo trago” made famous by Chavela Vargas.

I took one look at Flor and her family, and it reminded me so much of the time I was little and was in the hospital for months after a car accident.

CREDIT: Grey’s Anatomy / ABC

My family was also by my bedside every single day. If they couldn’t be with me because of work, they would make sure someone would be there so I wouldn’t be alone.

Thankfully Flor’s surgery was minor because I truly thought to myself, if she dies I’m gonna lose it. I say that because I know very well people on this show die left and right. No one is safe.

It was really special to see the non-Latino doctors embrace Día de los Muertos. Each of them discussed someone special that had died.

The Latino family told the doctors that Día de los Muertos isn’t necessarily to mourn those that have died, but more to celebrate their life. However, I think because some of the doctors were new to this holiday, they couldn’t help but feel sadness when thinking of their loved ones.

It was especially cool to see Ellen Pompeo — aka — Dr. Meredith Grey wearing a marigold flower for most of the episode.

Meredith Grey has seen her fair share of death on the show. She’s probably experienced more death than anyone.

Here’s a list of everyone that has died — that has been close to Meredith — since the show began:

  • Her mother.
  • Her husband.
  • Her sister.
  • Her best friend.
  • And countless colleagues.

The Latina grandmother informed Meredith that our loved ones, even though they have passed, are always with us.

After that special moment between the two, those words must have really resonated with Meredith because after that something insane happened.

Meredith’s dead family and friends appeared on the show!!

CREDIT: Grey’s Anatomy / ABC

All of those people pictured, aside from Meredith, including the dog have died. Meaning those characters are no longer on the show, but they made a special appearance, which is huge because they were such beloved people.

People on social media could not contain their emotions.

We were truly blindsided.

The mere idea that so many people that were close to her all died is honestly too much.

And yet Meredith goes on like a champ.

Some of us are still not over the fact that these characters are no longer on the show.

The only time we get to see them again is in re-runs.

One of the most special moments was hearing an old “Grey’s Anatomy” classic song “Chasing Cars” in Spanish.

“We were trying to figure out what song would play over that sequence and Kiley suggested playing an iconic Grey’s song and having it be covered in Spanish,” showrunner Krista Vernoff told The Hollywood Reporter. “That was her idea. As soon as she said it, I said, ‘Oh my God it has to be ‘Chasing Cars!” I mean how many times has that song played? It’s always our go-to. It felt like the most beautiful way to pay tribute to the history of the show while keeping alive the culture that we were celebrating with this episode. We commissioned that song.”

Here’s the Spanish version of “Chasing Cars” by Moon and Sun featuring Israel De Corcho.” But first get some tissues.

Okay, I’ll leave you with that.

¡Feliz dia los Muertos!


READ: 25 Ways Grey’s Anatomy’s Callie Torres Is Relevant AF

Share this story by tapping that share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

‘Love, Victor’ Is The Feel Good LGBTQ Vibe We Need Right Now And It’s Finally Available To Stream

Entertainment

‘Love, Victor’ Is The Feel Good LGBTQ Vibe We Need Right Now And It’s Finally Available To Stream

Love, Victor / Hulu

Even though shelter-in-place orders are slowly being lifted across the United States, should we really be going out with cases reaching record new levels? Thankfully, there are tons of new TV shows coming our way to keep us entertained.

Although we may be missing some of our longtime favorites because of production delays in Hollywood, the summer promises plenty of binge-worthy shows to tide us over. One of those TV shows I’m most excited about – and you should be too! – is Love, Victor.

Hulu’s Love, Victor is finally available for us to binge watch in all of it’s LGBTQ glory.

Love, Victor is the follow up to the successful gay romcom Love, Simon. However, unlike it’s predecessor, Love, Victor is a series, which means it’s literally bingeable. And with Love, Victor we get a young, Latino lead who is struggling to discover his sexuality and what that means for his friendships, relationships, and family.

This sequel offers a touching extension of that story, with a new teen — having transferred to the same high school — experiencing his own coming-out story. Diverted to Hulu from Disney+, it’s a well-crafted teen soap, with a winning cast.

Victor (Michael Cimino) — the oldest of three kids — has moved to Creekwood High in Georgia, which feels positively progressive compared to his hometown in Texas.

He makes contact with Simon (Nick Robinson) via email, using him as a sounding board as he comes to grips with who is — and more to the point, who he loves. Of course, Victor isn’t the only one with secrets, including issues pertaining to his parents responsible for the family’s relocation.

Coming from a less accepting background, Victor struggles with the prospect of being anything but straight and sharing that with his family, exacerbated by a visit from his bigoted grandpa, who is judgmental about Victor’s little brother playing with the wrong kind of toys.

Love, Victor is the highly-anticipated sequel to the film, Love, Simon.

Credit: Love, Victor / Hulu

2018’s Love, Simon was a milestone in young, queer representation on the big screen. But it was also overwhelmingly white and seemed made for a straight audience. Sure, its protagonist, Simon, struggled with his sexual identity, but he did so from inside thick layers of privilege that kept him safe. He was white, he lived in a fancy Atlanta suburb with his liberal, warm parents — he could and did easily pass for straight.

That’s why, though it was packaged as a chance for LGBTQ+ kids to finally see themselves on screen in a mainstream love story, the movie played it a little too safe for many queer viewers.

Enter: Love, Victor, where in the pilot’s opening minutes, the series espouses a mission statement that engages with the film’s limitations in a way that seems promising.

The series is now available (finally!) to stream on Hulu!

Every episode of Love, Victor is now available for streaming on Hulu. So if you’re looking for Latinx LGBTQ representation on TV, definitely tune in to Love, Victor.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

RIP That Time Disney Tried To Trademark Día de los Muertos

Entertainment

RIP That Time Disney Tried To Trademark Día de los Muertos

shot_by_prum_ty / Instagram

Since Disney Plus launched on November 12, people have been swept up in all the family-friendly chaos, indulging in a long list of classic Disney favorites. While the streaming service also plans to offer new original content, the company is definitely taking advantage of our generation’s lust for nostalgia, providing exclusive access to the Star Wars, Marvel, Pixar, and National Geographic franchises (and reminding us how much Disney dominated our youth with films like The Lion King, The Cheetah Girls, and Gotta Kick It Up). Honestly, the list of iconic feel-good films is outrageously long, and it’s easy to understand why everyone’s so excited.

But it’s no secret that Disney’s wholesome image has been blemished by a long, varied history of controversy and criticism. While Disney has been accused of sexism and plagiarism numerous times, one of the most notable topics of discussion in recent years has been the company’s tendency to racially stereotype its characters, a propensity that is  especially notable in early Disney films (though many scholars and film critics argue that this has carried into the 21st century, despite Disney’s attempts to be more culturally sensitive).

On many occasions, Disney has acknowledged the racist nature of its older animated films, like Dumbo, The Jungle Book, and The Aristocats. In the descriptions for several programs on Disney Plus, there is a brief warning about the “outdated cultural stereotypes” contained within each film, and while several people view this disclaimer as a sign of progress, Disney has been criticized for making a bare minimum effort toward addressing the problematic elements of its past.

And speaking of the company’s past, how could we forget the time that Disney tried to trademark the term “Día de los Muertos” / “Day of the Dead”?

Credit: Pinterest / The Walt Disney Company

Back in 2013, Disney approached the US Patent and Trademark Office with a request to secure “Día de los Muertos” / “Day of the Dead” across many different platforms. At the time, an upcoming Pixar movie with a Día de los Muertos theme (read: the early stirrings of Coco) was in the works, and Disney wanted to print the phrase on a wide range of products, from fruit snacks to toys to cosmetics. Por supuesto, Disney received major backlash for trying to trademark the name of a holiday—what is more culturally appropriative than claiming ownership over an entire celebration? Especially one with indigenous roots?

“The trademark intended to protect any potential title of the movie or related activity,” a spokeswoman for Disney told CNNMexico at the time. “Since then, it has been determined that the title of the film will change, and therefore we are withdrawing our application for trademark registration.”

But prior to withdrawing their application, Disney received extensive backlash from the Latnix community. Latinos all over social media expressed their disdain for Disney’s bold and offensive attempt to take ownership of the holiday’s name, even starting a petition on Change.org to halt the whole process. Within just a few days, the petition had garnered 21,000 signatures.

Although Disney didn’t acknowledge whether the online uproar had influenced them to retract their trademark request, they were clearly paying attention. Lalo Alcaraz, a Mexican-American editorial cartoonist, had expressed open disdain at what he called Disney’s “blunder,” creating “Muerto Mouse”—a cartoon criticizing said blunder—in response.

Credit: Lalo Alcaraz / Pocho.com

This wasn’t the first time Alcaraz had criticized Disney with his cartoons. After the trademark fiasco, Disney definitely caught wind of Alcaraz’s position, and in an effort to approach the upcoming Día de los Muertos movie with sensitivity, the company hired him to work as a cultural consultant on the film.

Although several folks celebrated this development, Alcaraz was widely denounced for collaborating with Disney—many people called him a “vendido,” accusing him of hypocritically selling out to the gringo-run monolith against which he had previously spoken out. But Alcaraz stood his ground, confident that his perspective would lend valuable influence to the movie and ultimately prevent Pixar from doing the Latinx community a disservice.

“Instead of suing me, I got Pixar to give me money to help them and do this project right,” Alcaraz said. “I was let down because I was hoping people would give me a little bit of credit for the stuff I’ve done; to give me the benefit of the doubt.”

And, sin duda, Coco emerged as one of the most culturally accurate films that Disney has ever produced. Employing an almost exclusively Latino cast and crew, Coco seamlessly captured the beauty, magic, and wonder of Día de los Muertos, depicting the holiday with reverence and respect. And after becoming the top-grossing film of all time in Mexico, it’s safe to say that Coco helped Disney bounce back from its trademark mishap, even if more controversy is bound to emerge in the future.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com