Entertainment

JuanGa’s ‘El Noa Noa’ Just Got A Modern Trancey Twist In A Remake From Georgel & Esteman And I Don’t Hate It

While it’s been three years since the iconic Mexican singer Juan Gabriel’s alleged death, JuanGa’s legacy is still alive. Every time a sequin is handsewn onto a garment, Juanga gets another pair of golden angel wings. He doesn’t need anymore, guys! To usher in a new generation of Juanga stans, Mexican singer Georgel, and Colombian singer Esteman have put a modern twist on the 1980’s classic “El Noa Noa.” 

While Juan Gabriel’s sexual orientation was subject to speculation during and after his life, it goes without saying that his flamboyant style with his bold sequins and whimsical touches found a comfortable home in the LGBTQ+ canon. His persona evoked a sense of liberation that was inaccessible to queer Latinxs at the time. What makes this version of “El Noa Noa” different, and what marks a clear evolution of LGBTQ+ folks in the Latinx community, is that both Georgel and Esteman are out and proud. 

This song is personal for Georgel.

Georgel and Esteman teamed up with producer Juan Pablo Vega to create a unique and fresh cover of “El Noa Noa.” The music video premiered this week on Billboard. 

“I grew up thinking of Juan Gabriel as the greatest artist in Latin America,” Georgel told Remezcla. He and his husband, Guillermo Rosas were friends with Juan Gabriel who they remember by his real name, Alberto. Georgel believes the ’80s bop was Juanga’s way of giving the public a tiny taste of who he really was. 

“‘El Noa Noa’ was an international hit during the ’80s and a social phenomenon for the LGBTQ+ community,” he said. “It gave strength to the phrase, ‘ser de ambiente’ (being part of the LGBTQ+ community) and in my opinion, it was a window into the world where [Juan Gabriel] always wanted to live.”

To revamp the legendary hit would be a huge undertaking. Georgel enlisted the help of another gay Latinx artist, Colombian singer and songwriter Esteman to give “El Noa Noa” a modern electro-cumbia update. 

“There was immediate chemistry, artistically speaking,” Esteman told Billboard. “He told me he wanted to do the song with me, and I thought it was a great idea to bring this classic song to our generation.”  

“El Noa Noa” was ahead of its time.

Georgel and Esteman decided to go with a retro-futuristic music video which is no surprise since “El Noa Noa” was way ahead of its time. The song envisioned a world where patrons of a Juarez nightclub could dance and be themselves freely. 

“In my opinion, it’s the most fun, it’s the most uptempo, it’s the one that our Mexican and Latin culture remembers as a party song,” Georgel told Billboard. 

Whether intentionally or not, it’s hard not to imagine a place not too different from an LGBTQ+ nightclub with ball competitions or the sexual freedom kept safely hidden between the walls of the infamous New York City nightclub Studio 54 in the 1970s. 

Out of this world.

In the video, Georgel and Esteman ride around in a sportscar wearing sequined bomber jackets. After getting stranded on the highway they discover a glowing red door that transports them to a Juarez club with drag queens, astronauts, galaxies, and choreographed dance. Complete with voguing and aliens, the new “El Noa Noa” brings the surreal feeling of the song to life by showing viewers a different world, one that might even be better than this one. 

“It looks like we’re on another planet but basically, it’s to show that when you go to ‘El Noa Noa,’ everyone is different,” Esteman told Billboard. “The best part is the message it sends of accepting each other in this diverse world, where everyone is welcomed and where we have freedom of speech.” 

New generation. New freedoms.

While “El Noa Noa” may have been an unspoken LGBTQ+ anthem in the 1980s, in 2019, what was unsaid can now be spoken. Georgel and Esteman couldn’t be better messengers to continue Juanga’s legacy of freedom, liberation and being as extra as you can be. 

In the world that they have created, even if it only exists in a 4 minute music video, everyone finally gets to be themselves in a way that many people of Juanga’s time could not. Even if it still just a fantasy (because hello, there are 71 countries where it is illegal to be an LGBTQ+ person) there was a time when even suggesting the fantasy could have dangerous consequences. “El Noa Noa,” now. “El Noa Noa,” forever. 

“What’s beautiful about bringing it back in this day and age is that we are showing it to a new generation, reviving it and making it alive again with two voices that are part of the LGBT community,” Georgel said. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

These Are The Latin Artists That Dominated VEVO’s Most Watched Lists For 2020

Entertainment

These Are The Latin Artists That Dominated VEVO’s Most Watched Lists For 2020

Medusa – Universal Music Group

It’s official: 2020 was the year that Latin artists truly dominated worldwide music and video charts. Despite the drama and pain of 2020, Latin artists were busy bringing their talent to so many of us who needed an escape from the constant reminders of what an unprecedented year 2020 was.

From Bad Bunny’s three albums in one year to J Balvin’s highly-ambitious Colores album, and the top-charting collab between Dua Lipa and Bad Buny, Tainy, and J Balvin in “Un Dia,” we had some serious bops this year.

Along with all this incredible music, we also got served some visually-stunning music videos – which, globally, were also dominated by Latin artists.

Vevo has revealed the top 10 most-watched artists and music videos of 2020.

One of the first things that pops out on this list, is the fact that four out of ten of the artists are Latinos. In fact, the number one spot is claimed by Colombia’s own J Balvin!

Karol G rocketed up the charts this year to the number two spot while Maluma (#5) and Shakira (#8) round off the list. Perhaps most shockingly, is the fact that Bad Bunny didn’t crack the top ten, considering so many of his albums were chart toppers this year.

Vevo also broke down the top Latinx videos of 2020.

J Balvin truly dominated the music video scene of 2020. Out of Vevo’s top ten videos by Latin artists, he is featured in half of them. From his own track “Rojo” off his Colores album to collabs with Dua Lipa, Bad Bunny, and Tainy on “Un Día” to the number one spot with Jhay Cortez and Anuel AA in “Medusa,” J Balvin had an incredible 2020.

Here’s a roundup – for your viewing pleasure – of the top music videos of 2020 by Latino artists.

Medusa – Jhay Cortez, Anuel AA, J Balvin

This track claimed the number one spot on Vevo’s “Most Watched Latin Videos” of 2020. And it’s easy to see why. Not only is it a great song, but the video features three of Latin musics top artists.

Agua – Tainy, J Balvin

Although “Agua” came in at number two on the Most Watched Latin Videos in the U.S. (with 26 million views), it also performed incredible worldwide. In fact, “Agua” received more than 479 million views worldwide, earning it the number four spot globally.

Hawái – Maluma

Maluma’s video for “Hawái” actually came in at number three on the worldwide list, garnering more than half a billion views! This earns him the number one spot among Latin artists on the worldwide circuit.

Ay, Dios Mío! – Karol G

Karol G truly rocketed to the top of the charts this year and although it’s surprising that “Tusa” didn’t make the cut (perhaps since it’s from 2019), she had two videos on this year’s lists.

First, “Ay, Dios Mío” charted at number 4 in the U.S. with more than 18 million views but it was also her top-performing video around the world as it came in at number seven globally with more than 307 million views.

Un Día – Dua Lipa, Tainy, Bad Bunny, J Balvin

Although “Un Día” failed to chart globally on the Vevo list, it earned the number five spot by Latin artists in the U.S. with more than 16 million views.

Se Me Olvidó – Christian Nodal

Another interesting thing of the Vevo list is the presence of Christian Nodal who made the cut with “Se Me Olvidó (La Canción Del Avión)”, which puts Mexican Regional music high on the countdown among mostly dembow specialists.

Favorito – Camilo

Another track that performed exceptionally well around the world, Camilo’s track “Favorito,” was viewed 13.2 million times in the U.S., earning the artist the number seven spot. But when it came to global views, “Favorito” was viewed 359 million times!

Camilo earned another top spot (#6) on the global list with his track “Vida de Rico.”

Me Gusta – Shakira, Anuel AA

This collaboration charted at number eight on Vevo’s roundup for the U.S. with more than 13 million views.

Bichota – Karol G

Her second entry on VEVO’s 2020 roundup, “Bichota” charted at number nine in the U.S. with more than 12 million views.

Rojo – J Balvin

J Balvin was all over the 2020 roundups but his track “Rojo” was his top charting video in the U.S. with more than 12 million views.

Who was on your most-watched lists of 2020?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Bad Bunny’s Music Videos Contain Powerful Messages And These Were The Moments That Gave Us The Feels

Entertainment

Bad Bunny’s Music Videos Contain Powerful Messages And These Were The Moments That Gave Us The Feels

Scott Dudelson/Getty Images

2020 marked the year that Bad Bunny became a global superstar. Sure he’s long been a favorite of many, but it was this year that his name rose to super stardom and entered the mainstream.

But he’s also a pioneer for breaking cultural stereotypes that are often engrained in Latino culture. And he’s used his powerful platform to speak out on a number of important issues, such as homophobia, transphobia, domestic violence and machismo. Many of these important messages are featured in his lyrics but also in his music videos, case in point: “Yo Perreo Sola.”

But it wasn’t just this video that rocketed Bad Bunny to the top of the charts or as an advocate for so many of us. Here we round up some of the top moments that Bad Bunny spoke to us through his powerful music videos.

Yo Perreo Sola

Perhaps one of Bad Bunny’s most obvious and poignant statements came in his video and lyrics for “Yo Perreo Sola.” In the video, Bad Bunny challenged gender roles by dressing in drag in the video for his female-empowerment anthem.

Dressed in full drag (including several outfit changes), Bad Bunny raps about a woman’s right to be left alone by men.

“Si no quiere bailar contigo, respeta. Ella perrea sola,” which translates to, “If she doesn’t want to dance with you, respect her. She twerks alone.”

Solo De Mi

Bad Bunny takes a powerful stand against domestic violence in the video for “Solo de Mi.” The emotional visual shows a woman standing in front of a microphone, and as it progresses, bruises begin appearing on her face. However, by the end of the video, she regains her power and celebrates by dancing with Bad Bunny.

Ignorantes

As Bad Bunny and Sech sing to their exes, the video highlights a diverse range of couples from various racial and sexual backgrounds. The duo also performed the song on The Tonight Show, which Bad Bunny used as an opportunity to highlight the story of murder of Alexa Negrón Luciano, a homeless transgender woman who was killed in San Juan, Puerto Rico in a hate crime four days prior to the performance.

Caro

Probably one of the first videos that put Bad Bunny on people’s radar as an outspoken advocate, Caro is all about refusing to to conform to rigid gender roles.

Not only is “Caro” a total bop, but he spotlights women from all walks of life and starts off the video with him getting his nails done. “Men also take care of themselves,” he previously told Refinery29. “There is no need to criticize why one decides to maintain themselves one type of way. Stop the ignorance and let’s think with a more open mind.”

Si Veo A Tu Mamá

Bad Bunny shines a light on mental health as the clip starts off with a man attempting suicide. The track then dives into the realities of depression and shows viewers that it’s OK to be in tune with your emotions even if you are a man.

When asked by Entertainment Tonight about his messages, he said, “I think, as a reggaeton singer, I have a [fan base] that I think needs that message or that type of education,” explaining that he’s not sure if others have realized how necessary it is to talk about issues affecting the LGBTQ community. “Creo que nadie en la vida a pensado, nadie en la vida quizá han realizado que se necesitaba. So, I decide to talk about these issue because it’s important.” 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com