Entertainment

Pixar Hired Cultural Consultants To Help With ‘Coco’ And It Looks Like They Definitely Helped Shape The Movie

Several years ago, Disney sparked a bit of controversy when they attempted to trademark “Dia de los Muertos.” Although they weren’t trying to trademark the holiday itself – the filing was for the title and related merchandise for an animated film – the move was seen as an attempt to cash in on a holiday that is sacred to many. After a backlash from the Latino community, Disney/Pixar withdrew its trademark attempt and eventually hired one of its vocal critics, cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz, as a consultant.

“My first reaction was ‘Wow. Is this for real? Should I do this? It’s pretty risky. Are they going to ask me to just rubber stamp stuff, or are they going to listen to what I have to say, cuz, you know, I have strong opinions,'” says Alcaraz. “My second reaction was, ‘PIXAR WANTS TO TALK TO ME.’ A combination of joy and terror.”

CREDIT: Pixar

Fast forward to today, and Disney/Pixar is just a little over a month away from the release of “Coco,” a Dia de los Muertos-themed film that appears to honor and respect the holiday as it is celebrated in Mexico.

After viewing the first 30 minutes, it’s clear Disney/Pixar worked hard to create a film that authentically captures the feel of Dia de los Muertos.

Co-director Lee Unkrich hopes the film resonates with those who celebrate Dia de los Muertos.

“We hope that our audience in those communities feel like we got it right,” he says. “That we spent the time to get the details right. That we dove deep and really did our best to come to understand the traditions and the intricacies of the holiday, and communicate it in a way that spoke to those communities but was also accessible to everyone in the world.”

CREDIT: Pixar

As important as telling a story that resonates with both Latino and non-Latino audiences is to co-director Adrian Molina, he also understands the importance of representation for Latinos.

“One really beautiful thing about this film, in particular, is to be able to feature a Mexican family, to be able to feature Mexican protagonists,” he says. “I think there’s something really beautiful and necessary about being able to see yourself up on screen – see yourself as the hero. For a Mexican-American or Mexican family to be able to go together and have that experience, I think that would be a unique thing that they could share in watching this film.”

Marcela Davison Aviles (President and CEO of the Mexican Heritage Corporation in San Jose, Calif.), playwright Octavio Solis and political cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz were brought on by Pixar as cultural advisors for “Coco.”

When asked how big of a role Pixar’s cultural advisors had in shaping the film, director Lee Unkrich revealed Pixar did something they’ve “never done on any other film” by inviting the team of cultural advisors as well as other figures in the Latino community from across the country to every one of their screenings.

CREDIT: Pixar

Alcaraz says each advisor brought something different to the table: “We each gave individual notes, we each have different strengths, so it was good to feel like between all three of us, the team members had it all covered. Marcela is a musical expert and writes extensive notes like a lawyer (because she is a Harvard trained lawyer) and makes me feel like I am a lazy slob. Octavio is a playwright and performer, and is really good on the theatrical aspects of the production. Me, I’m the cynical angry cholo whose strength is sometimes looking at things literally and catching what most people might miss. What a motley dream team!”

Unkrich, who co-directed “Finding Nemo,” “Monsters, Inc.” and “Toy Story 2,” says the cultural advisers were an integral part of the filmmaking process.

“Some of them were very wary about what we were doing and not sure about what our intentions were and how seriously we were taking it, but I think we put them at ease pretty quickly,” he says. “But [we] also made them feel comfortable giving us, sometimes, big notes. We made some big changes in the story based on the input that we got from the advisers.”

Alcaraz says they wanted to film to feel authentic but not didactic.

“I looked for elements of the film and story that could be misconstrued as stereotypical or racist. I looked to include more Mexican elements in the film when possible, like additional Spanish in the dialogue, and made suggestions on specific words. I listened for pronunciations of Spanish words to make sure they didn’t sound off. I think we struck a good balance on giving comments that helped the cultural authenticity of the story without bogging it down as if it were some kind of Dia de los Muertos documentary.”

CREDIT: Pixar

Alcaraz believes that Pixar’s hard work on the film will lead “Coco” to resonate far beyond the Mexican/Mexican community in the U.S. and Mexico.

“This movie will resonate with family, and will also send out good family vibes to everyone out there, Mexican/Latino or not. This is a time that we need to show how beautiful and rich other cultures can be, and how The Other is not scary, but just a person who happens to not be you. Like one of the Pixar fans out there in Twitterlandia said, ‘While some build walls, Pixar builds bridges.’ Also, the beauty of Mexico comes across clearly here, and also a note to the viewers and to future studios where I will be pitching movie ideas: Brown people sure do look really nice animated.”

We Saw A Preview Of Pixar’s ‘Coco’ And Here’s All The Cool Stuff To Look For When You Watch It

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The World Can’t Get Enough Of J Balvin, He Is YouTube’s Most Streamed Artist Worldwide

Entertainment

The World Can’t Get Enough Of J Balvin, He Is YouTube’s Most Streamed Artist Worldwide

Roger Kisby / Fotógrafo autónomo / Getty Images

¡Mi gente! Your faves could never. Latin music domination continues around the world with the top spots of global streaming platforms being stacked with Latinx artists. What a time to be alive. Remember when we all had to pretend Drake was Dominican to get some kind of representation out here? But when you think about the sheer number of people on the planet that speak Spanish, it totally makes sense that Latinx artists would have such a massive reach. 

And let’s be real, while fluency helps, you really don’t have to be proficient to enjoy reggaeton. The energetic, pulsating beats can compel anyone to move. Do you really think everyone in the United States knew the English translation of Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee’s “Despacito” in order to enjoy it? Music transcends language and so does Colombian trap artist J Balvin apparently. Do you think anyone even noticed that the lyrics in “Harlem Shake” are largely in Spanish? Nope. 

J Balvin is here to stay.

For six consecutive weeks, J Balvin has chopped the global charts on YouTube. That’s a total of 1.26 billion views on the platform. 

“Artista más visto en YouTube Global,” Balvin wrote in an Instagram caption.

This comes as no surprise to Balvin fans. In 2018, Balvin ousted drake as the most-streamed artist worldwide on Spotify. The singer surpassed 48 million monthly listeners last summer thanks to his single “X” with Nicky Jam which streamed over 327 million times. Balvin is in great company on the global charts with Daddy Yankee, Bad Bunny, and Ozuna all in the top 10. The trio’s single “China” with Anuel AA and Karol G is currently number 1 on the YouTube global charts and number 2 in the United States chart. However, we’re pleased to note that “Señorita” by Camilla Cabello and Shawn Mendes is topping the charts in the states. 

Balvin shouts out his Latinx fans. 

“Artista más escuchado en el mundo en @spotify posición #1 que celebro con todos mis latinos y los soñadores. Gracias Gracias Gracias,” Balvin wrote in the caption. 

Our boy is famous basically everywhere?

The top countries streaming Balvin’s music are Mexico with 240 million views, Argentina with 121 million views, and Colombia with 121 million views. The United States is in fourth place with 112 million views, followed by Spain, Peru, Chile, Ecuador, Brazil, and Venezuela. But fear not, Balvin has fans in at least 100 different countries according to YouTube. 

We stan a humble king of the masses!

Like, literally could you imagine how this level of adoration and attention would completely warp your mind? I would be a monster. I would build a house out of fan mail and then set it ablaze just to laugh at my stupid fans. I’d have so many, who cares! Meanwhile, the artist, who typically regales his followers with personal messages on Instagram every morning at 5 a.m., knows how to connect with his fans. Balvin even served ordinary people from a coffee cart in New York City the other day. 

“Buenos días , buenos días , buenos días !!!!! ARCOÍRIS TOUR empieza 30 de Agosto en Puerto Rico !! Choliseo,” he wrote on Instagram. 

 We stan a humble king of the masses!

This isn’t the first Latin wave (and it won’t be the last).

In the 1990s, the late and great Selena catapulted Tejano and Cumbia music into the mainstream American consciousness. This ushered in the era of the “Latin Explosion” where legends were born. Ricky Martin, Thalía, Marc Anthony, Enrique Iglesias, and Jennifer Lopez made their marks. Hell, even Frank Sinatra personally invited Luis Miguel to record a duet of “Come Fly With Me” on his 1994 album Duets II. 

In the 2000s, there was the “Latin Pop Boom” that saw the likes of Shakira, Paulina Rubio, and Christina Aguilera topping the charts. You may even remember non-Latinx artists trying to ride the wave with Beyoncé collaborating with Shakira on the duet, “Beautiful Liar,” and releasing a Spanish language version of the single “Irreplaceable.” It almost feels odd to call these decades different waves or eras when it is pretty clear Latinxs have been consistently rocking the charts since Gloria Estefan in the 1980s. Since then, in the United States, we have been blessed with many more Latinx acts including the likes of Selena Gomez, Demi Lovato, Camila Cabello, Becky G, and Cardi B. And of course, there are all the amazing imports from Latinx countries around the world. If we want to continue this Latinx chart domination, I only have one piece of advice: stream “China” by J. Balvin on YouTube and Spotify!

Bear Breaks Into Family Home to Eat All Their Tacos

Culture

Bear Breaks Into Family Home to Eat All Their Tacos

It was just a normal late night in for two teenagers in Lake Tahoe watching TV when they heard the refrigerator open. Hayes Sherman, 15, knew his mom and her cousin were sleeping upstairs, but couldn’t imagine they’d be up that late for a midnight snack.

It was a bear, and he was there for their tacos. Thanks to a Nest camera, the bear’s escapade was all caught on camera.

When the teens heard “Tupperware being opened really loudly and aggressively,” they knew something was wrong.

@CNN / Twitter

Not a normal mom move. The fridge door was opened for so long that the door started to beep. “I wasn’t exactly sure of what to do,” Hayes said.

The bear actually *broke* the Tupperware to get to the tacos.

@cuteh0bi / Twitter

The bear topped off his Taco night with two pints of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream–the Half Baked and The Tonight Dough flavors, of course. The bear also helped himself to some crackers. Susan Mohun, Hayes’ mother, took to Facebook to tell her friends, “Not all houseguests are considerate.”

“I was really scared,” Hayes said of the bear.

They turned the TV off and went to hold the sliding door in place to make sure the bear didn’t get into the same room as them. Hayes and his friend, Bobby Harden, 15, held the door closed as the bear tried to open it. The door was shaking when Hayes realized they didn’t have their phones and couldn’t even warn his mom.

An Apple watch ended up saving the day, but nothing could save the tacos at that point.

@mibtihajhussain / Twitter

He used his Apple watch to call his mom and whispered, “Mom, there is a bear in the house. Don’t come downstairs.” Then, he called the police. “It was very difficult, because I was whispering to 911 on my watch in a very dark room while trying to hold the door closed so the bear couldn’t get in,” Hayes later recalled.

Mohun didn’t even believe her son until she looked out the window and saw her car doors were opened.

Susan Mohun / Facebook

“I saw my car doors were opened, and I heard the refrigerator alarm beeping really loudly and realized those were two bad signs,” she said. Mohun later recalled that she was battling some serious maternal instincts. “That is the worst-case scenario as a parent to have a bear between you and your children,” she said. “I am glad that I didn’t run downstairs, because that probably would have just agitated the bear. It was one of the scarier parenting moments I’ve ever had, but thank God it all worked out,” she said.

Just 13 minutes later, the police arrived.

Placer County Sheriff’s Office / Facebook

For Hayes, 13 minutes of barricading your door against a hungry bear felt like hours. All police had to do was open the front door and watch the bear leave the house. The bear was so reluctant to leave the taco party, loitering in the driveway, that Deputy Prero fired a warning shot from her gun to make the bear get a move on.

The teens were so happy to see Deputy Prero that they hugged her, and, claro, took a photo together. In a Facebook post by Placer County Sheriff’s Office, the solution to the bear problem was simple. From the upstairs bedroom window, Mohun “explained the layout of the house and Deputy Prero quickly realized the bear entered through an unlocked garage door, which then closed behind the bear. Deputy Prero opened the front door (and got out of the way!), allowing for an avenue of exit.”

The bear *did* leave an unwelcome “present” on their living room rug.

@BRClarkBF / Twitter

We suspect that the Tupperware in question weren’t simple tubs of mantequilla. The damages are unimaginable. No more tacos, broken brand-name Tupperware and a giant caca in the living room. Thanks, bear.

If you live in bear country, and want to protect your tacos, you should probably listen to Placer County Sheriff’s Office’s warning.

@CNN / Twitter

Placer County Sheriff’s Office reported that “deputies have responded to many bear related calls in the Tahoe area the last couple of weeks and want to remind our home owners and visitors to lock their car doors and all residence doors. Additionally, don’t leave any food in cars. Bears have a very keen sense of smell and will find it, even behind locked car doors!”

Protect your tacos, people!

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