Entertainment

Cardi B Wants To Trademark The Phrase ‘Okurrr’ But Some Are Asking If She Really Created It

Cardi B has become one of the most recognizable stars in the music industry due to her unique personality and recognizable look. She is also known for her tongue-rolling phrase “Okurrr.” The Grammy-award winning artist is now cashing in on the trademark catchphrase as she now wants the law to recognize that she’s the one who made it big. According to the Los Angeles Times, she recently filed paperwork to trademark her catch phrase “Okurrr.” Cardi filed an application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office earlier in March. But since news broke about the trademark filing, a question is being asked about who really created it?

Cardi is hoping to use the trademark on clothing, posters and an array of marketing items.

Cardi plans to make money off of the catchphrase, which includes merchandise and other goods. With the trademark filing, she would be the only one allowed to use the word and be able to use it for profit as well as given credit for it.

“To the best of the signatory’s knowledge and belief, no other persons, except, if applicable, concurrent users, have the right to use the mark in commerce, either in the identical form or in such near resemblance as to be likely, when used on or in connection with the goods/services of such other persons, to cause confusion or mistake, or to deceive,” the fine print on the application said.

All of this has caused an uproar over who came up with the term and who should rightfully be given credit for it. Some people are giving Khloé and Kourtney Kardashian and Kendall Jenner credit for the catchphrase. They all used the phrase on several episodes of Keeping Up with the Kardashians in 2017.

There’s also Laganja Estranja, a season six contestant on RuPaul’s Drag Race, who used it first on the show. People took to Twitter to support Estranja and call out Cardi for being a “culture vulture,” meaning she is stealing another group’s culture and profiting off of it.

She quickly took to Instagram to defend her trademark filing.

“Let me tell you something,” she said in a now-deleted Instagram video over the weekend. “Everytime I go into a corporate meeting these folks be like ‘oh my god, can you please say okurr?’ Every time I go to a TV show ‘hey, hey, can you teach me how to say okurr?’ Every time I go do a commercial ‘hey, can you finish it off with okurr? You think I ain’t going to profit off this shit?!”

Cardi then pointed out the hypocrisy she has seen when it comes to other groups cashing in on similar trademarks.

“Bitch, white folks do it all the motherfucking time,” she said. “While I’m still here, I’m going to secure all the f*cking bags.”

She also took the time to acknowledge to respond to Estranja on Twitter over the dispute.

Cardi B responded to Estranja on Twitter referencing the words origins on the show and the ridicule she received when first suing “Okurrr.”

“Can I please do my iconic drop in the commercial for your new #Okurrr merch?!?” Estranja tweeted in reference to her on-show work room entrance. “I was once made fun of for using this word, and now you can help me come full circle.”

“Shiiiiiettt you will be the first I call but you gotta teach me how to do the drop first with out me breakin my hip,” Cardi responded.

Whoever is getting credit for the phrase is going to be interesting but Cardi B won’t be going down without a fight.

While many can argue the origins of who said “Okurrr” first, Cardi might have the advantage here. She will be able to argue successfully that she brought it to the attention of mainstream audiences and is responsible for popularizing the phrase. Cardi has also used it in a number of high-profile performances and appearances.

Like so much common slang today, the phrase was popularized in drag culture and probably originated in the Black community. Yet, Cardi B easily made the catchphrase part of her identity and brand since her jump to fame. Either way a simple shout out and acknowledgement to those that might have said it before can go a long way.

READ: Camila Cabello Honors Selena Quintanilla At Houston Rodeo By Singing “Dreaming Of You”

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Mare Advertencia Lirika’s Rap Game Is An Ode To Social Resistance

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Mare Advertencia Lirika’s Rap Game Is An Ode To Social Resistance

In Oaxaca, Mexico the hip-hop scene is dominated by men. Influenced by early ’90s American rap artists, most lyrics are misogynistic; a commonality in past and present wrap.

As a feminist uprising fuels the country, female rappers like Mare Advertencia Lirika utilize the depth hip-hop activism can have on social justice.

Growing up listening to banda, Lirika became exposed to American hip-hop when she was 12.

Although a fan, her language barrier impacted her resonance with the genre. After hearing Mexican rap groups like Caballeros de Plan G and Vieja Guardia, her spark for rap reignited.

“The history of rap is a mix of so many things that it gives room for anyone to fit into it,” she told Refinery29.

At 16, her rap career took off.

Under a machismo culture where women are often told ‘calladita te ves más bonita,’ Lirika defies outdated standards.

In her latest feminist anthem “Que Mujer,” she encourages women to rise up against patriarchal rhetorics.

With passion and prowess, her bona fide representation of class and gender struggles echo marginalized communities disenfranchised by systems of power.

Femicide rates in Mexico are rampant, having doubled in the last five years. On average 10 women are killed every day, but due to unreliable data and systematic impunity, many cases go under-investigated.

Oaxaca is a hot spot for violence, a reality Lirika knows too well. When she was five, her father was murdered resulting in the circumstantial feminist upbringing that fueled her vocality. Raised by her mother, grandmother and aunts, witnessing women take charge in making tough decisions helped to normalize her outspokenness.

Her feminist upbringing made her the strong woman she is today.

Identifying as Zapotec, an indigenous community native to Oaxaca, Lirika’s potent lyrics pay homage to her matriarchal upbringing and social resistance.

In “¿Y Tú Qué Esperas?” Lirika’s hearty alto sound shines as she asks that women speak and live their truth.

In songs like “Se Busca” she renders a poignant message demanding the return of those who have been kidnapped. Her visuals further amplify the severity of the issue as she raps, “cada persona que no está es un ausencia que no sana.”

Unafraid of confrontation, her cutthroat verses and poeticism are visceral.

Listening to her beats feel reminiscent of old-school rap, making it almost impossible to not nod along to her intellectual wit. Fusing the melodies of cumbias and reggae among others, she spits bars that sound the alarm of revolution.

But hostility towards women in the Oaxaca rap scene still lingers.

“Most people still think that women aren’t compatible with rap and think that we are wasting our time,” she told The New York Times in 2018. “We have to continue to show up at shows because it gives us confidence to see other women rap and to show people that we can also do this.”

Perhaps one of the best known Oaxaca rappers Lirika, 34, has established herself as a prominent figure in the genre. But her call to action is just beginning.

“My life context has taught me that I can use my voice,” she told Refinery29. “And maybe that’s a privilege of mine, one I shouldn’t have, but I trust very much what I have to say. I don’t fear what I have to say.”

READ: Latinas Talk About Learning Of The Heartbreaking Colonization Of Indigenous Land And The Genocide Of Its People

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Cardi B Says She’s Planning on Releasing a Line of Hair-Care Products For Afro-Latinas

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Cardi B Says She’s Planning on Releasing a Line of Hair-Care Products For Afro-Latinas

Photo via Getty Images

Looks like Cardi B is following in Rihanna’s footsteps and getting into the beauty game! According to a recent Instagram post, the Bronx-born rapper is going to be releasing a line of hair-care products for Afro-Latinas this year.

“This year I will be coming out with a hair[care] line that I been working on at home for my hair and my daughter’s,” Cardi announced on Instagram on Tuesday.

She explained that the decision to make hair-care products for Afro-Latinas was inspired by her realization that it’s “time for people to educate themselves on nationality, race and ethnicity.”

“Being Hispanic/Latina don’t make your hair long, don’t make your skin light, or don’t make your face features slim, [e]specially Latin countries from the Caribbean islands,” she explained further. “DNA [has] something to do with your hair, not your nationality.”

As many Latinos know, many non-Latinos are uneducated about the diversity of Latinidad. People expect all Latinos to look like Eva Longoria or Salma Hayek. But as we know, Latino is an ethnicity, not a race. Latinos come in all different shades, with vastly different features.

The comments on Cardi’s post were elated at the news that she would be releasing hair-care products for Afro-Latinas.

“Thank you!!! I’m Panamanian and they act like we don’t exist!” wrote one fan.

“Hair doesn’t have ethnicity. It has texture. It’s not black hair or white hair. It’s curly hair or straight hair. Kinky hairy or curly. 4a or 4c. People just generalize it and don’t understand,” wrote another.

On Twitter, another fan wrote: “Ok fav let’s talk about the hair care line you talking about so I can buy it and I won’t have to keep making the mask, forget everything else.”

Cardi’s decision to make hair-care products for Afro-Latinas came from (what else?) a Twitter argument.

When a Twitter user decided to challenge Cardi’s Blackness (again). The argument started when a Twitter user was claiming that Cardi’s hair pattern disqualifies her from being considered “Black.” So Cardi took it upon herself to educate her followers about the existence of Afro-Latinos. She also gave her followers a history lesson on the Dominican Republic.

The conversation got so frustrating that Cardi tweeted: “I think I’m going to do a video of different Hispanic people or Latin people or w.e. the correct term is nowadays. Cause people be thinking that every Hispanic is Mexican or something and must have the same hair texture, color, and features.”

Cardi B has always been passionate about hair-care. Last year, she shared a DIY hair mask recipe that she uses on her and Kulture’s rizos.

The hair mask consisted of argan oil, castor oil, olive oil, and mayonnaise. Since then, the at-home hair mask has gained a small but vocal fan club online.

If her hair mask recipe is a preview for things to come, we can’t wait to buy Cardi B’s hair-care products for Afro-Latinas.

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