Entertainment

People Who Worked On ‘Toy Story 4’ Hinted At Bonnie’s Dad Being Latino

Toy Story 4, the long-awaited fourth film of the Toy Story franchise, hit theaters this June and we were reunited with favorites like Woody and Buzz Lightyear. We also became acquainted with a few new faces, while coming to the realization that an animated movie can still make us ugly cry.

Between meeting Forky, Gabby Gabby, Ducky and Bunny, and Duke Caboom (hey, Keanu!), Toy Story 4 introduced us to a plethora of new characters. We even met Bo Peep again, whom you might remember has been MIA for a bit. And she comes back in this fourth installment as a whole new badass Bo Peep!

There was one character in particular who stood out among the rest: Bonnie’s dad.

Credit: Toy Story 4 / Disney-Pixar

If you recall, Bonnie is the toddler in Toy Story 3 who Andy gives away all his toys to, including his beloved Woody, before he heads off to college.

With his dark hair and caramel-like complexion, Bonnie’s dad clearly looked ethnically ambiguous. We wondered what he could be and thus it raised the question, could Bonnie’s dad be Latino? He reminded us of some of our dads, tios, primos, and friends. Even when we first saw Bonnie Anderson in Toy Story 3, we knew there was something different about her. She also had ambiguous features and didn’t quite look like the standard white character we were so used to seeing in Toy Story‘s past — or many cartoon films for that matter. But at that time, we had only seen her mom.

Bonnie’s dad is actually voiced by Mexican-American actor Jay Hernandez — who revealed in several interviews discussing Toy Story 4 that he has always been a fan of the franchise and dreamed of one day voicing a character for a Disney-Pixar movie — so if we needed any clues this one is certainly it. While on the red carpet of the Toy Story 4 world premiere, Hernandez revealed that the film’s creative team even began adding touches to Bonnie’s dad that were true to him. “I went to the session wearing Converse Chuck Taylors… certain kinds of shoes, and they added that to my character, which wasn’t originally there,” the Magnum P.I. actor said. “So I thought it was sort of an homage to me, it was cool.”

In a recent interview with Remezcla, Pixar producer Jonas Rivera, who also happens to be Mexican-American, noted that our assumptions about Bonnie’s dad possibly being Latino could indeed be right.

Credit: @jayhernandez001 / Twitter

“We never named him; he’s just Bonnie’s Dad. But in my mind, and since I know him well I feel I can speak for Albert [Lozano], the character is a reflection of our families. Albert’s dad is Mexican American like my dad is. That’s how we see dads,” Rivera said. He noted that growing up in a home with a Mexican father and mother of English Canadian descent also inspired the design of Bonnie’s parents. “We thought Bonnie’s dad would be closer to that model of a family. I know a lot of families that way in California,” he explained.

“When we made Toy Story 3, all my family thought she was based on my sister Raquel because she looked liked her when she was really little, and now in [Toy Story 4], Bonnie sort of looks like my niece Carly.”

The question then remains, was the casting of Jay Hernandez to voice the character of Bonnie’s dad therefore intentional? 

Maybe not quite, but Rivera explained that Jay just embodied what they were searching for in Bonnie’s dad perfectly.

“As a parent of three, the character is easy to relate to. He is the dad that’s always a little behind everything, and Jay was able to bring that in a truthful way,” Rivera told Remezcla. “To be totally honest with you, it wasn’t like, ‘Let’s find a Latino actor;’ it was more like, ‘Let’s find the right guy,’ but when I saw who it was with [director] Josh Cooley and [producer] Mark Nielsen, that was a bonus for me. I thought it’d be great if we could also have more diversity.”

He continued, “We make animated films about toys, monsters, and superheroes, but really we want them to be relatable to everybody and one of the ways you do that is if your films are diverse, not only the characters in the films but the people making them.”

Fans are loving the diversity the movie is bringing to the Toy Story universe.

Credit: Toy Story 4 / Disney-Pixar

The film did relatively well on having more diversity in its lineup of actors, adding the voices of those like Hernandez, Jordan Peele, Keegan-Michael Key, and Ally Maki. Toy Story 4 also showcased a lesbian couple dropping off and picking up their daughter from daycare. And the lost little girl we see at the carnival, who Gabby Gabby tries to console and ultimately winds up being able to claim as her own kid, is Black.

Toy Story 4 picks up right where Toy Story 3 left off, but not before momentarily taking us back in time to tell fans what happened to Bo Peep and her sheep. The Disney-Pixar picture dives deeper into Bonnie’s world as she heads off for Kindergarten orientation and shows us once again just how far Woody will go for his kid. Woody, Forky, Buzz and the rest of the gang wind up on an epic adventure after Bonnie’s dad declares they’re going on an end-of-summer road trip.

The family’s road trip places Woody on an unexpected journey through an antique store, with little Forky (who becomes almost like Woody’s child) in tow. And even Bonnie’s dad runs into some serious bumps along the way to their destination. Oh, and if you were still doubting that he could be Latino, just wait to see his reactions to a lot of the challenges he faces.

READ: If You Remember The Homies Toys, Their Story Is Even Better

7 of the Most Racist Tropes in Disney Movies

Entertainment

7 of the Most Racist Tropes in Disney Movies

Disney

On November 12th, Disney launched its much-anticipated streaming service Disney+, a platform that offers over 7,000 television episodes and 500 films of Disney titles to its subscribers. And while the influx of beloved Disney content is exciting, some Disney fans can’t help but cringe at the outdated, stereotypical tropes that some of the House of Mouse’s older content employed. And while racist tropes and offensive stereotypes were par for the course decades ago, we are now living in a world where sensitive cultural representation in the media is of the utmost importance. 

Aware of people’s lowered tolerance for racism in their entertainment, Disney+ has issued content warnings on some of their titles. The warning reads: “This program is presented as originally created. It may contain outdated cultural depictions”. And while some are applauding Disney for acknowledging the problematic nature of some of their content, others don’t think that a mere content warning is enough. Others are calling for Disney to make a greater effort to reckon with their problematic legacy. In light of these development, here are seven of the most racist moments in Disney movies that you can look out for when deciding on your next Disney+ viewing.

1. The Siamese Cats in “Lady and the Tramp”

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When “Lady and the Tramp” was released in 1955, it wasn’t unusual for the entertainment industry to create characters based on offensive stereotypes of what they believed people of Asian descent acted like. One of the most offensive instances of this were there characters “Si” and “Am” in “Lady and the Tramp”–two mischievous and troublesome cats who come into Lady’s home and make a mess, which Lady is ultimately blamed for. It doesn’t help that the cats are illustrated with slanted eyes and sing with broken accents. 

2. Everything about “Song of the South”

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Probably the most offensive and problematic of all Disney movies, “Song of the South” was released in 1946. It follows the story of a young boy who befriends Uncle Remus, a former slave who teaches him about life through a series of fables. The movie is upsetting for many reasons, one of which is the way the movie expresses nostalgia for the pre-Civil War way of life–which even the movie’s black characters seem to long for. The song “Song of the South” is the perfect example of this, where a black choir sings, “This heart of mine is in the heart of Dixie. That’s where I belong”. 

3. The Crows in “Dumbo”

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The crows in “Dumbo” are a play on blackface minstrel characters that much of the American audience would’ve been familiar with at the time of “Dumbo”‘s release in 1941. To add insult to injury, the character of Jim Crow (yes, that’s actually his name), was voiced by white actor Cliff Edwards, voicing an exaggerated version of a stereotypical black Southern voice. In “Dumbo”, Jim is depicted as lazy, dumb, and indulgent. This offensive stereotype of black people was well-known in the South. 

4. Sunflower in “Fantasia”

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In the original “Fantasia” released in 1940, the movie features a little black character named Sunflower. Sunflower was a black little girl with the body of a donkey. She was drawn with dark skin, an over-exaggerated nose and lips and braids in her hair. From her brief appearance in the movie, her apparent purpose in life was to help the glamorous white centaurs with their beauty routine (she was shown as filing the nails of a centaur). In later version, her character was cropped out completely of the movie to avoid a public outcry. 

5. “What Makes a Red Man Red?” in “Peter Pan”

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The racism inherent in “Peter Pan” is laid out plainly in the song “What Makes a Red Man Red?” that Neverland’s tribe of Native Americans sings to explain their history to the Lost Boys. The song is meant to be the origin story of how Native Americans got their skin color. The lyrics are as follows: “Let’s go back a million years/To the very first Injun prince/He kissed a maid and start to blush/And we’ve all been blushin’ since”. 

6. “Arabian Nights” in “Aladdin”

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Critics of “Aladdin” have long called the movie problematic for the way it depicts people of Middle Eastern descent and how it fails to illustrate the differences between various Middle Eastern cultures. Instead, the Kingdom of Agraba is a mish-mash of various cultures of the Middle East which implies that the cultures are interchangeable. And don’t forget the most problematic pat of the movie, the song “Arabian Nights” that contains the following lyrics: “I come from a land…Where they cut off your ear if they don’t like your face. It’s barbaric, but hey, it’s home”.

7. Shun Gon in “The Aristocats”

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The Chinese cat Shun Gon in “The Aristocats” is another prime example of a racist character that Disney employed in their earlier movies. Shun Gon is a member of O’Malley the Alley Cat’s street gang. He speaks in broken English, has slanted eyes and prominent teeth, and plays the piano with chopsticks. In other words, it doesn’t get more offensive that this. 

Here’s Everything We Know About the Lizzie McGuire Reboot

Entertainment

Here’s Everything We Know About the Lizzie McGuire Reboot

Disney+

When Disney first debuted their now-iconic “Lizzie McGuire” tv series in 2001, soon-to-be life-long fans of the series instantly identified a hit. The series, which starred Hillary Duff as the titular character followed Lizzie a teenaged girl navigating the obstacles that come with being an adolescent. At its peak, the series which lasted for three years and included a theatrical film titled The Lizzie McGuire Movie, was nominated for Emmy Awards and won various Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Awards. Now, much to the delight of women in their 20s and 30s who grew up clicking through channels to find “Lizzie McGuire” marathons (instead of streaming them) are now getting to revisit the series again. This time, with Lizzie McGuire being all grown up. 

This past August, fans of Lizzie received news that Hillary Duff would be returning to her iconic role for Disney+. The rebooted series, which will be of the same name, is to debut on Disney’s new streaming platform and while we don’t have too many details yet, there are some things we’ve been able to uncover thanks to our trusty journalism skills and Instagram stalking know-how. 

So! here’s what we know.

It will be on Disney+ and can be added to a bundle.

If you don’t want another app on your streaming device, you don’t have to sign up with Disney+ directly. Instead, you can get the Disney+ bundle with Hulu or ESPN+ included for $13.

We’re not sure who is definitely going to be in the series but Lizzie’s old BFF will for sure be there! 

A Lizzie McGuire reboot would be nothing without Hillary Duff so fans can be assured she’s definitely taking on the role of Lizzie. Hillary announced the reboot back in August saying, “the good news is, just like me and everybody who loved Lizzie and has grown up with her, Lizzie’s also grown up. She’s older, she’s wiser, she has a much bigger shoe budget, which is super exciting. She has her dream job. She has kind of the perfect life right now.”  On Instagram, Duff revealed that production for the series is already underway.  “SURPRISE!!! I’ve been trying to contain this excitement for a loooong time while this has been in the works!” she wrote. “I am beyond excited to be home again, back with my girl ♥️…and into her 30’s,” she wrote in a post. 

Adam Lamberg, AKA Lizzie’s best friend Gordo, is set to return. In an statement for Entertainment Weekly, Duff explained that “Gordo was an essential piece of the puzzle to what made the original Lizzie McGuire so authentic and beloved. I couldn’t imagine the series without him. I can’t wait for fans to see what he’s up to 15 years later and how he fits into Lizzie’s adult world.”

The series takes place when Lizzie is on the brink of turning 30.

The Lizzie McGuire reboot is set to pick up with Lizzie living in NYC and looking at turning 30. Working as an apprentice to an interior designer and engaged to a chef with his own restaurant, Lizzie appears to have her life pretty together. And yet, we can’t help but think that in true Lizzie fashion she’s still a bit clumsy and spazzing out when confronted about whether or not to ask for a bra. This feels particularly true considering that Duff has explained that the series won’t actually be set in NYC.

 “She’s not going to stay in Brooklyn too long, actually,” Duff explained in an interview. “That’s where she’s been, but she’ll be coming back to Los Angeles. She’s forced out of New York. She’s like, ‘I can’t be here anymore.’” 

Lizzie’s in love again and it’s not with Ethan Craft.

According to reports, the new series sees Lizzie with a boyfriend restaurateur who owns a restaurant in SoHo which means he’s successful as hell. But it sounds like the relationship isn’t all that perfect because it eventually ends. “You know what, I don’t know if I was as devastated by that,” Duff told Vulture in an interview.  “I feel like them not being together is what was so good…. It’s that one person that you’re like, ‘Was he the one? Is it ever going to be?’ You’re always kind of wondering. We wanted it to hurt everyone a little bit, and it’ll continue to hurt.” 

Speaking about Lamber being in the series, Duff said  “I really hope he’s going to be involved… We’ve been planning out the season and coming up with what everything looks like, and it’s so important for him to be there for part of it.

Earlier this month in interview with E!, Duff also hinted that Lizzie might even cross paths with her old middle school crush. “He is hot. He’s very hot,” Duff said of Snyder.

 “I’m pretty sure there’s going to be, there’s going to be a thing. ‘Why now?’ I think it’s the right time to set back in and have her go along with you in your 30s and all the fun times, and all of the big monumental moments, and all of the challenges that you’re faced with,” Duff went onto explain to People. “I just thought that there was an opportunity there for her to be grown-up and for her to be there for women again.”