Entertainment

Bad Bunny Goes Norteño: The Latin Trap Icon Joined Corrido Star Natanael Cano To Create The Wildest Mashup

Corrido is going from old-school abuelo music to a more urbano and trap-infused genre lately. The classic regional Mexican sound, known for its narrative folk ballads, is slowly but surely joining in on the ‘música urbana’ movement that has the whole world listening. And with Bad Bunny injecting his hip-hop and trap flair into the genre, we can confirm that corridos tumbados, are officially the new thing. 

After visiting Mexico for a run of tour dates in support of his latest album X 100Pre, Bad Bunny surprised us all with a unique project: a corrido. 

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

In his latest release, the trap-reggaeton star tapped the urban regional Mexican label, Rancho Humilde, for a collaboration that would bridge the gap between regional Mexican music and Puerto Rican música urbana —and surprise us all with the result. El Conejo Malo got in touch  with the urban corrido, or corrido tumbado artist, Natanael Cano.

Natanael Cano is part of a new school of Corrido, the ‘Corrido Tumbado’ which adds trap and urban influences to the classic genre.

Credit: natanael_cano / Instagram

Cano is part of a burgeoning movement of Mexican artists making trap corridos (or “corridos tumbados”) that incorporate hip-hop elements into the traditional corrido style. At just 18, Cano has turned into an internet sensation. His viral hits “El F1” and “El Drip” have more than 17 million views on Youtube. And his song “El de la Codeína” made it to #1 on Apple Music’s Latino chart.

With the remix to ‘Soy El Diablo’ Bad Bunny wants to promote unity among all Latinx communities.

Credit: natanael_cano / Instagram

Bad Bunny and Natanel Cano emerged with a remix of Cano’s gritty 2019 track, “Soy El Diablo” (“I Am the Devil”). Taking cues from the Sonora native, Bunny sings Cano’s lines in his unmistakably Caribbean accent, over strums of acoustic guitar.

“Para mi gente linda de Mexico, Puerto Rico, Latinoamerica/Eso es pa’ toda mi raza/ America es nuestra casa,” says one of Bad Bunny’s lines —using the song as a platform to promote unity among all Latinx communities. “This is for my beautiful people in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Latin America/This is for my race/America is our home!”

Bad Bunny had been teasing the collab for a few weeks.

The unlikely pair dropped the first official urbano/corrido collab in October, weeks after teasing at it with Benito posting videos of himself on Instagram singing along to the song and drinking tequila from the bottle. “It’s something I never imagined. Like, zero percent,” Cano said in an interview about the remix. But the Mexican artist is acutely aware of the important place that Latin urbano sounds hold in the global musical landscape of the moment. “We’re the new generation [of regional], and we have that other sound naturally inside of us. It’s organic.”

In the song Bad Bunny even uses regional Mexican slang and references.

The corrido opens with Bad Bunny’s “Ajuaaaa.” His delivery, and even his slang —which include shout outs to Canelo Álvarez and Rancho Humilde and words like “compa,” and “banda” are typical of the regional genre to refer to the people— show the importance that Benito gave this remix.

The collab was first suggested to both parties by Marissa Gastelum, who runs Latin artist relations at Apple Music.

Credit: ranchohumilde/ Instagram

“In September, Noah [Assad, Bad Bunny’s manager] called me and asked me what I thought of this kid,” recalls Gastelum in an interview with Billboard. “He told me Bad Bunny really loves this song ‘Soy El Diablo.’ And I said, wait, lets do something!”

Gastelum called Jimmy Humilde, the owner of indie Rancho Humilde  Records, to which Cano is signed. Humilde, who has worked to create an “urban regional” sound that appeals to a younger generation of regional Mexican fans, thought it was a great idea, and so the regional/urban remix was born.

Bad Bunny chased his tequila-fueled release with a string of New England tour dates — and a stint as guest lecturer at Harvard University. If we can count on Benito to do one thing, it’s to inject his cool-effect on anything he touches. 

Amid All The Drama Of The Latin Grammys And Urbano Music, Here’s What Happened At Last Night’s Latin Grammys

Entertainment

Amid All The Drama Of The Latin Grammys And Urbano Music, Here’s What Happened At Last Night’s Latin Grammys

NBC Universal / YouTube

The 2019 Latin Grammys hosted by Ricky Martin kicked off yesterday at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. There were some big wins for Juan Luis Guerra, Mon Laferte, Christian Nodal, Bad Bunny, Luis Enrique and — much to many Latinxs’ chagrin — Spanish singers Rosalia, who won Album of the Year, and Alejandro Sanz.

However, there were many highlights of the evening as well. Legends Celia Cruz, Juan Gabriel, Joan Sebastian, and Gustavo Cerati received a lavish tribute. Vincente Fernandez made his story when he brought his son Alejandro and grandson Alex Jr. on stage to perform. Bad Bunny gave a disruptive speech about the Latin Grammys snubbing reggaeton artists, and strangely enough, a member of Metallica showed up. These are the 2019 Latin Grammys highlights. 

A tribute to late Latinx legends ushers in a star-studded 2019 Latin Grammys. 

Brazillian singer Anitta was accompanied by merengue veterans Olga Tañon and Milly Quezada to perform a samba and merengue infused version of “La Vida es un Carnaval,” to honor Celia Cruz. Then Mexican crooners Carlos Rivera, Reik, and Leon Garcia came on stage to perform JuanGa’s “Querida.” 

Natalia Jimenez, Calibre 50, and Prince Royce performed Mexican singer-songwriter Joan Sebastian’s “Secreto de Armor.” Ricky Martin was joined by Draco Rosa, Fito Paez, and Beto Cuevas to honor Gustavo Cerati with their rendition of Soda Stereo’s “Musica Ligera.” 

Miguel sang in Spanish and everyone lost their minds.

Miguel performed a Spanglish version of “Show Me Love” with Alicia Keys. After the Mexican heartthrob sang his parts in Spanish, people on Twitter kind of lost it. 

“Miguel singing in Spanish is making me feel some type of waaaay *heart eyes*,” one user wrote. 

“Seeing @Miguel sing during the Latin Grammys with @aliciakeys was something else. Sensual and romantic at the same time,” another Twitter user wrote.

“My parents are watching Latin Grammys and I look up to see Miguel and Alicia Keys performing I was likeajxjdjxj,” a stunned user wrote. 

Mon Laferte bared her chest on the red carpet for Chilean rights.

We can’t exactly show you the full photo, but Chilean musician Mon Laferte, who won Best Alternative Music Album, bravely exposed her breasts to get the public’s attention about human rights in Chile. Written across her decollete in black ink were the words “En Chile Torturan Violan,” which translates to “In Chile They Torture, Rape, And Kill.” 

At least 20 people have been killed during protests in Chile about wealth inequality (the nation is one of Latin America’s wealthiest) and better social services following the government’s announcement of higher subway fares. Tens of thousands of protesters set up fiery barricades and confronted riot police in October. 

Vincente Fernandez showed three generations of Mexican artistry. 

“I’m a grateful man for my family and my music,” Vicente Fernandez said as he was joined on stage by his son Alejandro and grandson Alex. “When you listen to the voice of who has your blood, you feel immortal.” 

Alejandro performed his latest single “Caballero.” Throughout the tear-jerking performance by the trio, family photos were displayed in the background. 

 “I still needed to sing 50 more songs but I owe it to you. All I want to say to God and my public is that you know you are a part of me until the day they bury me. Thank you,” Vincente said after receiving a standing ovation. 

Bad Bunny stood up to the industry while accepting his reward. 

Bad Bunny scored his first Latin Grammy for Best Urban Album for X100Pre. Bunny was one of many artists to join Maluma in defending reggaeton against the industry’s consistent snubbing of musicians of the genre.

 “Reggaeton is part of Latin music,” he said. “To my colleagues, let’s give it our all. The genre has become about views and numbers but we have to bring different things to the table.”

Nella won Best New Artist. 

Venezuelan artist Nella, a Berkeley College of Music alumni, won Best New Artist. She snagged the tile from Paulo Londra, Greeicy, Aitina, and Cami. 

“This is for everyone who, like me, comes from another country looking for new opportunities,” she said.

Juanes win Person of the Year and gets a surprise from Metallica.

Colombian rock musician Juanes won Person of the Year after performing a medley of songs including “A Dios Le Pido” and “La Camisa Negra.” He was surprised by Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich who presented him the award. 

 “You guys changed my life,” Juanes told Ulrich. The drummer says he met Juanes ago while performing in Mexico. 

“Tonight we come full circle. I proclaim myself a Juanes fan, my friend, my parcero, I’m proud to recognize you as Person of the Year for the Latin Recording Academy,” Ulrich said. 

After So Much Controversy, Bad Bunny And Other Reggaeton Artists Will Be Performing At The 20th Annual Latin Grammys

Entertainment

After So Much Controversy, Bad Bunny And Other Reggaeton Artists Will Be Performing At The 20th Annual Latin Grammys

badbunnypr / paulaarenasmusica / Instagram

It looks like we finally know who will be taking the big stage at the 20th Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards. This past Tuesday Latin Recording Academy announced a slew of performers that will include some of the biggest names in the Latin music industry. Among them are several of this year’s GRAMMY nominees highlighted by Alessia Cara, Bad Bunny, Paula Arenas, Draco Rosa, Ximena Sariñana, and Sebastián Yatra. This will also include newcomer and reggaeton star Sech and as well as GRAMMY-winning singers Natalia Jiménez and Olga Tañón.

The award show, which will be hosted by Ricky Martin for the first time ever, will also take the time to recognize two decades of celebrating notable artists in Spanish-language music as the event marks its 20th anniversary. This means that the event will be pulling out all the stops when it comes to recognizing the very best that Latin music has had to offer in the last two decades. The Latin Recording Academy says the event will showcase “a historic star-studded celebration, complete with special reunions, tributes and musical icons” for this special anniversary. We can already hardly wait.

Here are some of the details we know so far about the 2019 Latin Grammy Awards including some big acts that will be taking the stage. 

Credit: @LatinGrammys / Twitter

Among the artists already mentioned, we have some details on some of the acts that will be sharing the stage together and some tributes that will be handed out that evening. According to Billboard, GRAMMY-nominated Mexican singer Alejandro Fernandez will perform alongside his father, legendary ranchera singer Vicente Fernandez and his son Alex Fernandez for the first time ever at the show. The trio is set to be accompanied by the Mariachi Sol de México as they take center stage. 

“Ready to celebrate #20YearsOf Excellence in the biggest night in Latin music,” Alejandro tweeted.

The evening will also take the time to celebrate one of the most popular Latin artists: Juanes. The Colombian singer-songwriter will be performing a medley of some of his biggest hits throughout his career and will also receive the award for Person of the Year 2019 from the Latin Recording Academy. Juanes is also nominated for a Latin Grammy.

While it’s great that the award show will have some urbano acts perform live, there is still some anger over the nomination snubs.

The annual show is a celebration of the past 12 months in Latin music, a genre that has seen an explosion of mainstream popularity, most notably when it comes to reggaeton. With the rising prominence of artists like Bad Bunny, J Balvin, and Maluma, you’d expect them to be at the forefront of the show. 

While Bad Bunny and Sech will be performing, both artists have called out the Latin Recording Academy for basically ignoring urbano, reggaeton, and Latin trap genres when it comes to nominees. At the heart of the controversy is the exclusion of some of the genre’s biggest stars from major categories such as Record of the Year, Song of the Year, nor Album of the Year.

Some of the biggest stars in Latin music including Daddy Yankee, Maluma, and J Balvin have all joined Bad Bunny and Sech in criticizing this year’s Latin Grammys.

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Frente a los Latin Grammy

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The artists have taken to social media to spread the message of  “Sin Reggaeton, No Hay Latin Grammys” that has been widely circulated online. According to the GRAMMYS’ official website, urbano music dominated streaming services like Spotify, Apple Music and Pandora this past year. With the exclusion of these popular urban artists like J Balvin, Bad Bunny and Ozuna, it has reaffirmed the Recording Academy’s well-documented bias against urban music.

“We respect and admire all the genres that compose the world of Latin Music,” the Recording Academy wrote in a statement responding to the controversy. “The Latin Recording Academy has followed a strict voting process for the past 20 years. The members, through their votes, select what they believe merits a nomination.”

Despite the controversy, we’re excited to see how the evening rolls out and if some of the acts use the platform to shine some positive light on the popular genre. This is also only the first round of performers that have been announced so far so keep on the lookout for more news on this special night!

The 2019 Latin GRAMMY Awards will air live on Univision from the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas on Thursday, Nov. 14 at 8 p.m. ET/PT.

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