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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Made A Student Loan Payment During Meeting To Prove A Point About Corruption

One of the least talked about topics on the realm of American politics has to be the corruption of financial student loan institutions. The immigration crisis, climate change, and even healthcare are discussed more extensively, but when it comes to education and the high cost of college, the voices aren’t enough. However, it should be known that in the United States, the student loan debt is currently at $1.5 trillion. More than 44 million people are drowning in student loan debt, and one of them is a United States representative. 

During a committee meeting, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez stated that she made a student loan payment, but she wasn’t slacking off.

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez was in the middle of a House Financial Services Committee hearing and said — to make a very valid point — that she had made a roughly $200 payment on the remainder of her student loan, which is now more than $19,000.

“I literally made a student loan payment while I was sitting here at this chair, and I looked at my balance, and it was $20,237.16,” Rep. Ocasio-Cortez said during the hearing. “I just made a payment that took me down to $19,000 so I feel really accomplished right now.”

The youngest lawmaker in the House of Congress wanted to show the corruption by student loan institutions and how several of those companies have ties to United States Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos. She added that she feels strongly against the Republicans view on this topic, saying, “I’m hearing people on this committee say it’s not our job. This is our job.” 

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez isn’t the only lawmaker making student loan payments. There are 70 other members of congress that are still paying off their student loans.

The New York Post is reporting that “70 members of Congress who are still paying off student loans for themselves or a dependent — with an average debt burden of $37,000. Eight lawmakers are said to have more than $100,000 in debt.”

This is not the first time, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez has spoken out about the student loans that paid for her college education at Boston University. Back in June, on the steps of Capitol Hill, she said this fight is personal for her“It was literally easier for me to become the youngest woman elected to Congress than it is to pay off my student loan debt.”

People who are making monthly payments to their student loans, on average, contribute about $300 a month, which is not enough if they owe at least $35,000. According to a report by CNBC, “About one in four Americans has student loan debt, with the average balance just over $37,000. The average student loan payment is $393 a month, which is almost 20 percent of the typical American’s monthly household income.”

Student loan debt is one of the contributing factors as to why people are postponing getting married, starting a family, and purchasing a home. They simply cannot afford to get into the next chapter in their life because they’re drowning in debt.

That is why Rep. Ocasio-Cortez and other politicians are fighting to forgive student loan debt and make college tuition-free.

Some may say people should have to pay their own debt, but others such as presidential candidates Sen. Bernie Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth Warren. Like Rep. Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders said that millennials shouldn’t have to suffer at the hands of corrupt student loan institutions.

“It is time to end the absurdity of sentencing an entire generation—the millennial generation—to a lifetime of debt for the ‘crime’ of doing the right thing: getting a college education,” Sanders wrote in Fortune

Furthermore, Sanders and the rest of the Democratic presidential candidates are also running on a promise to make college tuition-free, mainly state schools. New Mexico just announced they are offering free college education for state universities. Other states that are now offering a free college education includes Oregon, Nevada, Arkansas, New Jersey, Maryland, Tennessee, New York, Rhode Island, Delaware, Kentucky, and Indiana.

“This program is an absolute game-changer for New Mexico,” Governor Lujan Grisham said in a statement, according to the New York Times. “In the long run, we’ll see improved economic growth, improved outcomes for New Mexican workers and families and parents.”

READ: It Is So Hard To Pay Back Student Loan Debts In The US That American Borrows Are Fleeing To Live Abroad To Avoid Paying

AOC Doesn’t Want Us To Go Back To 70-Hour Work Weeks When We Reopen The Economy

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AOC Doesn’t Want Us To Go Back To 70-Hour Work Weeks When We Reopen The Economy

CSPAN

For the past month and a half, the United States has seen a sweep of stay-at-home orders meant to protect communities and individuals from the deadly coronavirus. While these mandates have worked to “flatten the curve” of causing hospitals to be overwhelmed they have also caused massive job loss amongst Americans. Which is why many have taken to the streets to push back against quarantine orders and secure their jobs back.

Still, at this time researchers have tirelessly tried to explain that reopening the economy is not in the best interest of public health, or the country.

That’s why when President Donald Trump took to Twitter to encourage online extremist communities to push back against orders, many of us were not thrilled.

In a series of tweets last Friday, Trump called to “LIBERATE MINNESOTA!” Later he called to “LIBERATE MICHIGAN!” and “LIBERATE VIRGINIA, and save your great 2nd Amendment. It is under siege!”

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, in particular, was not amused. In a recent interview with VICE, AOC slammed President Trump’s support of protesters calling to “liberate” various states from their lockdown orders.

“Only in America, does the president, when the president tweets about liberation, does he mean ‘Go back to work,’” the progressive legislator said. “We have this discussion about ‘going back’ or ‘reopening’ — I think a lot of people should just say, ‘No, we’re not going back to that. We’re not going back to working 70-hour weeks just so that we can put food on the table and not feel any sort of semblance of security in our lives.”

In another portion of the interview, Ocasio-Cortez talked about the virus’s impact on her district.

“I have to call family members, congregations, and people in our community offering condolences day in and day out. I have to talk to teenage kids who have lost their parents. I have to talk to spouses that have lost their husband or wife of several decades,” Ocasio- Cortez said speaking of her district which encompasses Queens and the Bronx.

. “I have to talk to people who have lost their pastor or who have lost their imam or who have lost their spiritual leader of their community, and you know, I have to talk to people who say, ‘Where am I going to get my next meal,’ or ‘Am I going to be evicted from my apartment next month?’” 

AOC Gets Real About Biden’s Sexual Assault Allegations, Becomes First Member Of Congress To Even Bring It Up

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AOC Gets Real About Biden’s Sexual Assault Allegations, Becomes First Member Of Congress To Even Bring It Up

Scott Heins / Getty

With the Democratic primary season all but officially over, Vice President Joe Biden is now the presumptive nominee. He’s got the endorsements of his primary competitor, Bernie Sanders, and his former boss, President Obama.

Although Rep. Ocasio-Cortez hasn’t explicitly endorsed the former VP (she was a surrogate campaigner for Sanders), she’s come out in support of his candidacy since Sanders dropped out of the race. However, despite her strong support for his campaign, AOC admits there are still stones left unturned regarding Biden’s sexual assault allegations.

In an interview, AOC says it’s absolutely ‘legitimate to talk about’ the allegations against Joe Biden.

Credit: Paul Sancya / Getty

The congresswoman was asked about the allegation against the former vice president during an online forum hosted by The Wing, a women’s network and community space, by a questioner who said she was strongly opposed to President Trump’s reelection but that she also “really resent[s] the fact that the other choice is someone who has a really long history of being creepy to women,” citing the allegation by former staffer Tara Reade.

“I think it’s legitimate to talk about these things,” AOC responded, according to CBS News. “And if we want, if we again want to have integrity, you can’t say, you know — both believe women, support all of this, until it inconveniences you, until it inconveniences us.”

“I think a lot of us are just in this moment where it’s like, how did we get here? You know, it almost felt like we started this cycle where we had kind of moved on from, you know, from all of this. And now it feels like we’re kind of back in it,” she added. “You know, the most diverse field that we’ve ever seen — that we’re kind of back kind of replaying old movies in a way.”

Reade herself responded to AOC’s insights, saying she was proud to have the congresswoman weigh in — for the first time — on her allegations in a public way.

In the summer of 2019, Ms. Reade was one of several women to accuse Biden of a history of inappropriate touching and invasion of personal space. At the time, he said that while he apologized if he made anyone feel uncomfortable, he was not sorry for any of his intentions.

It was in the midst of the primary contest this spring that Reade made a more serious and more specific allegation against Biden, accusing him of pinning her against a wall and seriously assaulting her in the spring of 1993.

The Biden campaign has vehemently denied the allegation – although Biden hasn’t spoken about this particular one in public at all.

Credit: @JoeBiden / Twitter

His campaign told the New York Times, “It is untrue. This absolutely did not happen.” They also cited Biden’s role as an author of the Violence Against Women Act in response to the accusation.

“Vice President Biden has dedicated his public life to changing the culture and the laws around violence against women,” Kate Bedingfield, a deputy Biden campaign manager, said in a statement to the Times.

“He authored and fought for the passage and reauthorization of the landmark Violence Against Women Act. He firmly believes that women have a right to be heard — and heard respectfully.”

AOC also said it’s not fair to prioritize beating Trump in November over hearing the stories of survivors.

Credit: @CharlotteAlter / Twitter

“A lot of us are survivors, and it’s really, really hard and uncomfortable,” Ocasio-Cortez said, adding that choosing not to talk about the allegations is the “exact opposite of integrity.”

It’s “not okay” to prioritize beating Trump over discussing ugly and sensitive accusations against the other candidate, she said, because those issues are “very legitimate things.”

Despite the call for transparency, AOC committed to supporting Biden in his campaign against Trump.

Credit: Scott Heins / Getty

Speaking during a Wednesday morning appearance on “The View,” she said she was “absolutely” supporting presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, arguing that “the stakes are too high when it comes to another four years of Trump.”

My community especially has been so impacted by the Trump administration,” AOC said of her feelings on the general election choices.

“For a lot of communities, this is an issue of life or death. We’ve had kids in cages, we’ve had a pandemic response that happened way too late, that has cost us lives, we have people that don’t have access to critical care that they need. I think it’s really important that we rally behind our Democratic nominee in November,” she continued.

AOC, who endorsed Sanders last fall, went on to speak out against voters going with a third-party candidate if Biden isn’t their ideal pick.

“I think it’s important to communicate some empathy. I know for a lot of people this was not the outcome that they may have wanted, and this was not the choice that they wanted to make. But ultimately, when it comes to those two, I don’t think it’s particularly close in terms of what communities will be made more vulnerable,” she continued.