Entertainment

Here Are The Most Anticipated Latino-Written Books Coming Out This Year

Growing up, the only time we heard stories that resonated with us was reading that one Latino authored book during Hispanic Heritage Month. Thankfully, the number of Latin-American authors have skyrocketed since grade school.

Whether you’re searching for the next memoir to grip your heart, a work of fiction to expand your imagination or an anthology of poems to take in, we’ve got you. Here are the most anticipated Latino-authored books that have already been released, or are scheduled to be released in 2019.

“The Affairs of the Falcon” by Melissa Rivero

CREDIT: @melissarivero_ / Instagram

Peruvian author Melissa Rivero’s “The Affairs of the Falcon” marks her debut into the world of fiction. You can bet her experience as an undocumented immigrant living in Brooklyn seeps all the fear, dreams and determination into each page and each reader’s heart.

“Native Country of the Heart” by Cherríe Moraga

CREDIT: @thefeministreader / Twitter

Activist Cherríe Moraga is giving us a heart full of love and loss—from everything she learned about her mother’s immigration story from Mexico to the U.S. before she passed from Alzheimer’s to her lesbian coming of age story in a Mexican-American family. Moraga gives us it all.

“In the Dream House: A Memoir” by Carmen Maria Machado

CREDIT: @carmenmmachado / Instagram

Machado is taking us inside a world that is so evasive and difficult to describe: her experience in an abusive same-sex relationship. The way she places you smack dab in the emotional whirlwind of her past is pretty creative and worth reading.

“Mouthful of Birds” by Samanta Schweblin

CREDIT: @librarypoweruser / Twitter

Schweblin has been lauded by The New York Times as “the most acclaimed Spanish-language writers of her generation.” Her newest release is exquisite and bizarre in its own right. One Amazon reviewer described it as “Eerie, chilling, heartbreaking, thought-provoking. A must read.” You just have to read it to understand.

“Analee in Real Life” by Janelle Milanes

CREDIT: @janellemilanes / Twitter

Milanes does an incredible job of describing the rift of self between an online sense of self–confident, brave, and adventurous–and the reality of living with social anxiety out in the real world. The story of Analee Echevarria is something that every person immersed in technology can relate with.

“The Scandal of the Century: and Other Writings” by Gabriel García Márquez

CREDIT: @timhoiland / Twitter

While Márquez is best known for “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” he is famous for saying that he wants to be remembered for his journalism. This is the first ever complete anthology of Márquez’s journalism.

“Things We Lost in the Fire” by Mariana Enriquez

CREDIT: @annabookdesign / Twitter

Argentine Mariana Enriquez is the only person who could describe the grim realities of contemporary Argentina. This isn’t a feel-good read. Enriquez speaks truth to paper, entrenching her readers in the stark inequalities, the pervasive fear in a military dictatorship and how you go on living life.

“The Spirit of Science Fiction” by Roberto Bolaño

CREDIT: @penguinpress / Twitter

Set in Mexico City, this book has found a home with Spanish-language world. This will be the first time it meets the English speaking world thanks to a translation by Natasha Wimmer.

“With the Fire on High” by Elizabeth Acevedo

CREDIT: @acevedowrites / Instagram

Caption: “This is the story of Emoni Santiago, a teen mom who wants to be a chef but isn’t sure if following that dream is best for her family. This character arrived to me fully formed and whispering in my ear and on May 7th she will be in the world.”

“Superman: Dawnbreaker” by Matt de la Peña

CREDIT: @alexperc92 / Twitter

De La Peña is a New York Times bestselling author and Newbery award winner. Thanks to his pen, we now have the Superman edition of the DC Icons series.

“Dealing in Dreams” by Lilliam Rivera

CREDIT: @kima_jones / Twitter

Rivera’s debut novel, “The Education of Margot Sanchez,” would be hard to beat… until you meet Nalah. After she builds her own girl gang, she wants more and must cross borders to make all her dreams come true.

“Don’t Date Rosa Santos” by Nina Moreno

CREDIT: @christineexists / Instagram

Call this the Cuban Rom-Com you needed on paper. Nina Moreno is giving us the novela level of drama and love curses that Latinas can relate to.

“In the Dead of Night” by Linda Castillo

CREDIT: “In the Dead of Night” Digital Image. Barnes and Noble. 24 April 2019.

Bestselling New York Times author Linda Castillo is rereleasing an old murder mystery classic. Sara Douglas can’t seem to shake the nightmares from her parents’ murder and partners with the chief of police to get to the bottom of it.

“The Moscow Rules” by Antonio & Jonna Mendez

CREDIT: “The Moscow Rules: The Secret CIA Tactics That Helped America Win the Cold War” Digital Image. Barnes and Noble. 24 April 2019.

The power couple that gave us Argo is now sharing their own personal accounts of working as CIA operative in Moscow during the Cold War. We’re just waiting for the film adaptation.

“The Daughter’s Tale” by Armando Lucas Correa

CREDIT: @amycnickless / Twitter

In a similar vein, “The Daughter’s Tale” tells the story of two French sisters who must escape occupied France during World War II and flee to Cuba. Correa has received many awards from the National Association of Hispanic Publications and the Society of Professional Journalism.

“The Other Woman” by Daniel Silva

CREDIT: “The Other Woman (Gabriel Allon Series #18)” Digital Image. Barnes and Noble. 24 April 2019.

Daniel Silva places us in the south of Spain, circa the end of WWII, with an international mystery to unravel. Spies from both Russia, Israel and the U.S. all come together for a suspenseful plot twist on the Potomac River outside Washington state.

“The Wind That Lays Waste” by Selva Almada

CREDIT: @kglyder / Twitter

Selva Almada takes us to the Argentinian countryside to meet a father-daughter missionary duo traveling Argentina right before their car breaks down. As they spend the day with two strangers, Almada gives us the nuanced tensions and intimacies that evolve between four stranded people throughout the day.

“Lima :: Limón” by Natalie Scenters-Zapico

CREDIT: @Poetry_Daily / Twitter

Scenters-Zapico bears it all in this collection of stories that depict life between borders. We meet Mexican women living in the U.S. and Mexican women living in Mexico. We become intimate with the realities of domestic violence and machísmo; of the double standard in pain tolerance women are expected to bare. Her stories are urgent, grounding and chilling.

“Sabrina and Corina” by Kali Fajardo-Anstine

CREDIT: @mariposachula8 / Twitter

Fajardo-Anstine’s experience as an Indigenous Latina raised in white-washed Denver, Colorado is giving us the short stories we need. You’ll have to read “Sabrina and Corina” to find out their stories.

“Tell Me How It Ends” by Valeria Luiselli

CREDIT: @litinquiry / Twitter

Luiselli has expanded on her 2016 edition of “Tell Me How It Ends” because the obstacles facing undocumented Latino youth in America have significantly expanded. Luiselli humanizes these young people and the choice between violence charged with racism in America and gang violence back home.

READ: 24 Children’s Books You Should Read To Your Child Now

White Students Burned A Book After A Latina Called Them Privileged, Not Realizing That Burning Books Is A Privilege

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White Students Burned A Book After A Latina Called Them Privileged, Not Realizing That Burning Books Is A Privilege

lina Kapyro / EyeEm / getty images

Truth hurts, white privilege exists and it’s beyond toxic. Students at a predominantly white university in Georgia took umbrage with this truth however when a Latina author delivered a lecture at their school about the issue. In protest of the notion that they were privileged, several students who had attended the lecture committed one of the most privileged acts of all time and burned her book.

Jennine Capó Crucet spoke at Georgia Southern University on Wednesday night about her book “Make Your Home Among Strangers.”

Her novel is a fictional piece about a young Latina from a lower-middle-class family living in Miami. The book follows her journey as she attends school at a prestigious college in New York state and struggles to keep up both socially and academically in the new “predominantly white” school setting. According to Georgia Southern University, the book was required reading for some of its First-Year Experience classes.

After speaking about the book at Georgia Southern University’s Performing Arts Center on Wednesday she opened up her lecture to audience questions.

According to GSU’s school newspaper the George-Anne, the question and answer section of the lecture quickly turned into a rush of questions about her criticisms of white people.

“I noticed that you made a lot of generalizations about the majority of white people being privileged,” one student said to Capó Crucet, according to the school paper. “What makes you believe that it’s okay to come to a college campus, like this, when we are supposed to be promoting diversity on this campus, which is what we’re taught. I don’t understand what the purpose of this was.”

In response, Capó Crucet explained that she had been invited to the university to speak about white privilege “It’s a real thing that you are actually benefiting from right now in even asking this question,” she reportedly replied.

It didn’t take long for her response to spur more questions about race and white privilege from students present. According to Buzzfeed News, students became upset when the author asserted that most white people “needed to be removed from authority positions because two-thirds of people in high positions should not be white.”

That evening a group of students organized a burning of her book on campus.

According to reports, some students also gathered outside of the hotel that she had been staying at.

“Last night’s discussion with the author devolved into accusations of her demonstrating racism against white people. Some students burned copies of Crucet’s book and even gathered outside her hotel. We assert that destructive and threatening acts do not reflect the values of Georgia Southern University,” Dr. Russell Willerton, the department chair, said in a statement.

In response to the burning, Capó Crucet tweeted “This is where we are, America.”

In response to the book-burning incident that took place on their campus, the university’s vice president for Strategic Communications and Marketing John Lester said the school is “not planning any actions against any of the students involved in this incident… While it’s within the students’ First Amendment rights, book burning does not align with Georgia Southern’s values nor does it encourage the civil discourse and debate of ideas.”

Truth is that whatever you think of white privilege and the contents of this author’s book is never really a good look.

READ: A Viciously Racist Video Has Gone Viral In Which Two Girls Call For The Return Of Slavery And The KKK

‘Roma’ Star Aparicio Is Named UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador And Will Advocate For The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples

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‘Roma’ Star Aparicio Is Named UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador And Will Advocate For The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples

Within a matter of just a year, Mexican actress Yalitza Aparicio has made a name for herself as both an artist and an activist. Earlier this year, the 25-year-old actress, born in Tlaxiaco, Mexico, made history as the first indigenous actor nominated for the best actress award at the Academy Awards for her breakout role in the film “Roma.” In the months after the film came out, the actress has worked hard to display her Mixteco language and heritage, financially support Oaxan students from her hometown, and combat any stereotypes or ignorant impressions you might have of indigenous people. For her work, the young actress is, once again, being honored. 

This time, it’s with a wonderful new role with the United Nations’ cultural agency United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as a goodwill ambassador for indigenous people.

On Friday, UNESCO— a Paris-based organization— announced that they had appointed Aparicio to help them advocate for gender equality and indigenous rights. 

yalitzaapariciomtz / Instagram

In an interview about her newest role, Aparicio said that she felt “proud to be an indigenous woman” and would like to aim “to go hand in hand with UNESCO in the best way, to be able to support these indigenous communities.”

According to NBC News, the young actress also said that it was her hope that she would pass on the traditional wisdom of indigenous communities as well as combat racism. “As my grandparents used to say: ‘You have to take care of the land because you eat it.’ So hopefully we learn this part,” she said.

During her announcement of her new role, Aparicio said that it would also be her goal to shed light on the various legal complications that indigenous people face in the government systems around the world. 

yalitzaapariciomtz/ Instagram

“There are several cases where there are indigenous people who are judged in a foreign language, without the right to have a translator and I think it’s something that we should take action on”, she said.

There’s no doubt that based on the year Aparicio has had that she is a woman who understands first hand why advocacy for indigenous people is so important. 

yalitzaapariciomtz / Instagram

The Academy Award-nominated actress Yalitza Aparicio became the first Mexican woman to receive such an honor. However, despite the respect and esteem, she should have earned, it wasn’t uncommon for her to receive unwarranted racism from her community of actors in Mexico. At one point, telenovela star Sergio Goyri used racist slurs to say that he didn’t feel Yalitza Aparicio deserved an Oscar nomination. In a video posted to the veteran actor’s Instagram, he  commented that Aparicio should not have received a nomination for an Academy Award saying  in Spanish “Que metan a nominar a una pinche india que dice, ‘sí señora, no señora’, y que la metan a una terna a la mejor actriz del Oscar.

In English, his offensive and vulgar language translate to “That they nominate an Indian click that says, ‘Yes ma’am, no ma’am’, and that they put it in a shortlist for the best Oscar actress.”

Later the actor apologizes saying that it was “never my intent to offend anyone. I apologize to Yalitza, who deserves [the Oscar nomination] and much more,” the 60-year-old said on Instagram. “For me, it is an honor to see a Mexican be nominated for an Oscar.”

Staying above it all like always, Aparicio responded to Goyri’s offensive remarks by stating that she was proud of who she is and where she is from. 

“I am proud to be an Oaxacan indigenous woman, and it saddens me that there are people who do not know the correct meaning of words,” Aparicio said in a statement to The Guardian.

“Roma” director, Alfonso Cuarón, also came to the defense of Aparicio this week by saying that Goyri’s words should be a broader discussion as to why people, particularly in Mexico, have those feelings, and also why the media perpetuates stereotypes.

With all that Aparicio has experienced, we’re excited to see what she does for Indigenous people in her newest role.

Aparicio has continued to prove this year that she is nothing but a rising star on the scene. Despite the fact that English was not a language she knew fluently when she took up her first Hollywood film (and first film!) she continues to be the face of international success and proof that anyone can come from any circumstance and get to the top. We hope that her new role she will outshine any ignorance and cruelty that might come her way and that she will continue the fight for freedom for Indigenous people everywhere.