Entertainment

All You Need To Know About The Latino Spider-Man: Miles Morales

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse / Sony Pictures

With the release of the surprise animated hit and Oscar winner, “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” the world is suddenly aware of one of the incarnations of Spidey: Miles Morales, a Latino superhero. However, the character has been a constant feature in the Marvel comic book universe for quite some time, since 2011 to be exact. Right in the middle of the Obama years, media, in general, started to move forward in terms of representation, and Marvel wasn’t left behind. Morales represented a huge step in terms of how popular culture manifestations such as comic books can, in fact, be representative of a multicultural, inclusive society. 

Here’s everything you need to know about our very own Latino Increíble Hombre-Araña.

His full name is Miles Gonzalo Morales

Credit: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse / Sony Pictures

Very telenovelesco is you ask us. He is a half-Black, half-Latino Brooklyn teenager. 

He is fluent in Spanish which brings him closer to his Latina mom. 

Credit: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse / Sony Pictures

Comic book writers have made him proud of his heritage, and one of his superpowers is being bilingual. He also has some uniquely Latino tastebuds: he loves his mom’s pasteles. He and his mom Rio share a bond by speaking Spanish, effectively creating a world that the two of them can share. 

The character was created in 2011 by comic book writers Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli

Credit: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse / Sony Pictures

The reason? Bendis, who is African-American, wanted to create a character that young Black kids, like his own, could relate to. Repeat after us: Representation matters. 

He is Peter Parker’s successor with great power. 

Credit: miles-morales-spider-man-1149710. Digital image. ComicBook.com

After Peter dies (or did he?), Morales is bitten by a genetically enhanced spider, and with the aid of S.H.I.E.L.D., the family and friends of the late Peter Parker and other encapuchados he becomes the one and only Spidey. There is drama, of course, as his police officer father Jefferson totally loathes justice fighters. 

He is a superhero by pure chance.

Credit: 20-things-miles-morales-can-do-that-peter-parker-cant. Digital image. Beauty Milk. 

The story is a bit silly, actually. Miles was visiting his uncle, who robbed Oscorp and unknowingly got the arachnid bite too. He was bitten by surprise and got unexpected superhuman abilities. 

He was only 13-years-old when the transformation happened

Credit: 537bcfc2204f0_0. Digital image. SyFy. 

Because of this, Nick Fury and the rest of the S.H.I.E.L.D team had to keep a very close eye on him. 

He is hated by Venom.

Credit: sonys-animated-spider-man-film-will-feature-miles-morales-social. Digital image. Regionale. 

Venom is one of Spider-Man’s most violent foes. When he learned that a new Spidey was jumping around, he immediately sought a confrontation. The scenarios are eerily similar to the ones in the duels he had with Peter Parker. 

Miles had the Stan Lee seal of approval. 

Credit: stl090516-1533840341456_400w. Digital image. IGN. 

That’s right, Stan Lee himself, who passed away just last year, was one of the comic-book personalities who approved of Miles and silenced critics who said that Miles was an affirmative action move by Marvel. Lee considered that it was great for non-white youth to have a role model. 

He is inspired by Donald Glover.

Credit: Community / NBC

Miles Morales is the result of an unlikely source of inspiration: Donald Glover’s character in “Community,” in particular, the episode where he is wearing his Spider-Man pajamas.

He has two extra-awesome abilities that the original Spider-Man lacked.

Credit: 60b727f77961bd3be8779aabed7407ef. Digital image. AminoApps

Check this out: 1. He can camouflage himself. 2. Like many arachnids, he has a venom that paralyzes victims so Miles can serve justice. 

His father, Jefferson Davis, hates superheroes.

Credit: 2662157-miles. Digital image. Comic Vine. 

Miles kept his secret identity from his father for a long time, because his dad used to be a burglar and distrusts superheroes. In the comic books, there have been some great and tender father-son moments between Miles and Jefferson. 

He didn’t want to be Spider-Man at first.

Credit: 2662157-miles. Digital image. CBR Community. 

It actually took him a year… and we don’t blame him. Imagine being a 13-year-old suddenly invested with superpowers and super responsibilities. When he was 14, though, he finally embraced his new powerful identity. 

Conservative commentator Glenn Black said Miles looked “too much” like Barack Obama.

Credit: 2662157-miles. Digital image. The Verge. 

The host said that Marvel felt pushed to create this here after Former First Lady Michelle Obama said that some traditions needed to be changed. Oh, hay quienes siempre le ven tres pies al gato. 

He has teamed up with The Avengers


Credit: All-New, All-Different Avengers (2015) #1 _ Comics _ Marvel.com. Digital image. Marvel

Yes, this happened in the November 2015 issue All-New, All-Different Avengers #1. Wouldn’t it be great to see this in the Marvel Cinematic Universe?

He loves sneakers.

His favorite are his Air Jordans… he even fought Venom wearing a pair. In real life, Nike released a special edition to commemorate the release of “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.”This retro version has a black, white and red design, also in honor of Latino Spidey’s now iconic suit. 

He might just be immortal.

Credit: miles_morales_hero_image. Digital image. SyFy Wire. 

Norman Osborn sort of tells him that one of the side effects of the serum that gave him so much power could be immortality. That would be a lot to take in for a teenager. 

His mother is killed by Venom.

Credit: 5943c62c233d5a7986d115bb7ac61ce81e12b03a_hq. Digital image. Amino Apps

Yes, Rio Morales, a nurse, is killed by perhaps the most famous villain in the Spider-Man universe. 

He was once so sick he almost died.

Credit: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse / Sony Pictures

Yes, it happened in “Spider-Man 240.” The creator Michael Bendis became ill, which served him as inspiration to write a whole issue in which the hero is mostly in bed, being supported by family and friends to stay alive. This is where the immortality superpower was put into question. 

Cuidado! Spoiler alert.

Credit: Spider-Men #1-5. Digital image. SyFy

Peter Parker wasn’t truly dead! No estaba muerto, andaba de parranda. Yes, Peter and Miles embark in some pretty amazing adventures together in “Spider-Men”issues 1 to 5. 

His best superpower: having a BFF.

Credit: spiderversemovie / Instagram

Let’s be honest, Peter Parker sorta sucks as a friend and has run into some bad luck. But not Miles, who can always count in his best friend Ganke Lee to listen to him, offer consolation and just be a wonderful sidekick in life. 

He has an evil uncle, and he kicks his ass.

Credit: prowler_ultimate_spider-man (1). Digital image. SyFy. 

His uncle Aaron, who got Jefferson into trouble many times in their youth, becomes the incarnation of Prowler. Time for his nephew Miles to put him in his place.

Fans Of Spider-Man Are In Meltdown Mode After News Breaks That The Series May Be Out Of The Marvel Universe

Entertainment

Fans Of Spider-Man Are In Meltdown Mode After News Breaks That The Series May Be Out Of The Marvel Universe

Sony Pictures

Yup, you read that traumatizing headline correctly. Your eyes aren’t playing tricks on you. It’s been confirmed that Tom Holland, the latest actor to play the beloved Peter Parker on the big screen, will no longer be involved in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. 

But what does that actually mean? And how does that affect Miles Morales, the first ever Afro-Latino Spider-Man who starred in “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”? 

So how did we get here? We need someone to blame.

Well, like most things in life, it looks like it all revolves around a dispute about money. Disney, which owns Marvel, suggested an equal cofinancing agreement between it and Sony, according to Deadline, the first outlet to report the news. This would mean the studios would split profits 50/50 as well. When Sony declined this offer, Disney acted by removing Kevin Feige — the president of Marvel Studios who has had tremendous success with the latest Spidey iteration — as a producer on future films featuring the famous webslinger.

Nobody seems to know exactly what’s going to happen next here. Sony has been building a fairly impressive Spider-Verse of their own lately. Venom turned out to be among the most profitable films of 2018, and their recent Into the Spider-Verse won the Academy Award for best animated feature.

The studio is putting together a sequel to Venom, which has already received some attention for its recently-announced director, Andy Serkis. There’s a Jared Leto-starring Morbius film in production, and, reportedly, a Kraven the Hunter film on the way, along with some other rumored Spider-Man-Universe films (that, as of now, will not feature the beloved web slinger). Sony may be banking on getting the current Peter Parker—or some form of him—back in their Spider-Verse, and out of the MCU once and for all. This means, of course, that it’s possible for fans to get a Venom and Spider-Man crossover.

Amid the shock, sadness, and uncertainty, fans did the only thing they could do: laugh to keep from crying.

One fan described the news as being just the latest tragedy that comic fans have had to endure this summer, following the conclusion of Avengers: Endgame.

And what about Stan Lee?!

People considered Spidey’s ousting from the MCU as a slap in the face to the late Stan Lee, the superhero’s co-creator, who once called Holland “a great Spider-Man.”

Fans are convinced the series is cursed.

People thought about Sony’s role in all the Spider-Man films to date — like the third movie in Tobey Maguire’s time in the franchise, which was panned, and Andrew Garfield’s turn as Spidey, which was met with mixed reviews.

Now fans fear Holland is being done dirty by Sony.

In fact, it does seem like there’s a pattern where things go a little haywire every time Spidey is supposed to star in a third film.

And then there’s Miles Morales.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse / Sony Pictures

With news that the series will no longer be part of the Marvel Universe, where does that leave the first Afro-Latino Spider-Man? 

Many are hoping that if Tom Holland is out, there could be an opening for the bilingual star.

His version of Spider-Man went on to win an Oscar and brought greater representation to a community that struggles to see itself in the media. 

Comic book writers have made him proud of his heritage, and one of his superpowers is being bilingual. 

The character was created in 2011 by comic book writers Brian Michael and Sara Pichelli.

Credit: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse / Sony Pictures

The reason? Bendis, who is African-American, wanted to create a character that young black kids, like his own, could relate to. Repeat after us: representation matters.

He is Peter Parker’s successor with great power. 

Credit: miles-morales-spider-man-1149710. Digital image. ComicBook.com

After Peter dies (or did he?), Morales is bitten by a genetically enhanced spider, and with the aid of S.H.I.E.L.D., the family and friends of the late Peter Parker and other encapuchados he becomes the one and only Spidey. There is drama, of course, as his police officer father Jefferson totally loathes justice fighters. 

Latin America Has Its Own Amazing Comic Book Tradition And These Iconic Titles Prove It

Entertainment

Latin America Has Its Own Amazing Comic Book Tradition And These Iconic Titles Prove It

mexicoretro / valenzrc / Instagram

Even though Marvel and DC Comics superhero comics are obviously very popular in Latin America (as they are in the rest of the world), the region has developed its own comic book industry. This industry has given birth to iconic characters. These characters and stories speak directly to Latin American reality and identity. They deal with challenges such as economic crisis, class division, racism, and State repression. Of course, they do this in an often funny way. Other comics have achieved cult status even if their quality is, well, not of the highest standards. These are ten titles that speak of the depth and breathe of Latin American creativity. 

Title: Condorito
Country of origin: Chile
So when was it first published? It has been published since 1949
Created by: René Ríos, known as Pepo

Credit: condoritooficial / Instagram

The adventures of a Chilean condor that lives among humans is told in short vignettes that always end with a character passing out and the iconic word PLOP. Simple stories deal, however, with issues such as unemployment, the military dictatorship in Chile and class division. Condorito is a working-class everyman who faces class discrimination. Before Pinochet took power the comic was a bit conservative, mocking hippies and left-wing politicians, but after the coup, it changed and silently denounced the dictatorship. A 3D animated movie was released in 2017, with iconic characters such as Cabeza de Huevo, Garganta de Lata and Pepe Cortisona. 

Title: La familia Burrón
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1948
Created by: Gabriel Vargas

Credit: peltre.cuina.mexicana / Instagram

It was published for 60 years and told half a million copies, a huge number by Mexican publishing standards. Cuevas got into the hearts and minds of a lower-class Mexico City family. It is a linguistic jewel: it used slang, Prehispanic words and invented words that appealed to the creativity of chilango vernacular. Vargas’s main influence was American comics, but he soon developed a style that was unique and influences generations of Latin American comic book artists. 

And this family is a true icon of Mexico City

Credit: yosoymims / Instagram

Up until today, this family is venerated by Mexicans. There are multiple murals, toys and museum exhibitions dedicated to the Burrones. A true representation of 20th century Mexican idiosyncrasy. 

Title: Las aventuras de Capulina
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1970s
Created by: Oscar González Guerrero on a character created by Gaspar Henaine Pérez

Comic books in the U.S. are an internationally known community of superheroes but Latin America boasts its own impressive rooster of comic superheroes.
Credit: mexicoretro / Instagram

Gaspar Henaine Pérez, better known as Capulina, was a comedian that became iconic on the 1970s and 1980s. He had a television show and a very successful duo with Marco Antonio Campos, better known as Viruta. The character of Capulina gained huge popularity in a comic book series with stories by comic artist Oscar González Guerrero and art by his son Oscar Gonzalez Loyo. 

Title: El libro vaquero
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1978
Created by: Mario de la Torre Barrón, c

Credit: 99.hawells / Instagram

A classic of Mexican kitsch! NSFW content that has plenty of blood and plenty of sex. It was considered mass entertainment for the lower classes but is now being reinterpreted as an important cultural icon that deals with gender, sex and national identity. As the title suggests, it all happens in a microcosm of cowboys and saloons. This comic book has enrolled some famous writers, such as Jordi Soler, to write stories, as it is now a cultural icon, popular among hipsters. 

Title: Memín Pinguín (yes, this one is quite problematic)
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1962-2010
Created by: Yolanda Vargas Dulché

Credit: miguelf039 / Instagram

First things first: this is a very controversial title because of how the Afro-Mexican main character is drawn, and because of the ways in which other characters refer to him. There are plenty of stereotypes here, but also a denouncement of racism. The class division in Mexico is also referred to when a rich student is enrolled in a public school and faces the wrath of the proletariat. An interesting object of study that makes us think of how representations of race that might have been seen as innocent at the time gain new dimensions as the effects of stereotypes are better understood. 

Title: Kaliman
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1965 (previously a radio show from 1963)
Created by: Modesto Vázquez González (radio show), Hector González Dueñas (Víctor Fox) y Clemente Uribe Ugarte (comic book)

Credit: valenzrc / Instagram

During the 1960s Mexico was a cultural powerhouse in the continent and Kaliman is good proof of this. The superhero was originally just a voice on the radio, but then became a comic book that was published for 26 uninterrupted years, which spanned 1351 issues. Kaliman is a superhero of unknown origin who was raised in India and fights alongside an Egyptian kid named Solin. Kaliman practices multiple martial arts and goes to mystical places like Tibet! A true transnational creation generated in Latin America

Title: Mafalda (but of course we couldn’t possibly forget her!)
Country of origin: Argentina
So when was it first published? 1964-1973
Created by: Quino

Credit: Giphy

More of a comic strip rather than a comic book, Mafalda is a young girl who hates soup, loves her family and despairs at the state of the world. Argentina’s answer to Charlie Brown and the Peanuts series is a funny, nostalgic and thought-provoking universe in which childhood’s point of view reveals the idiocy of the adult world. Mafalda is a symbol of pacifism and a true icon of Argentina. 

Title: Love and Rockets
Country of origin: United States
So when was it first published? 1981
Created by:the Hernandez brothers: Gilbert, Jaime, and Mario.

Credit: Love and Rockets / Fantagraphics Books

Perhaps the most daring and iconic comic book to come out of the Latino community in the United States. This universe of interrelated storylines have traits that make it uniquely Latino: some stories take place in the Central American fictional village of Palomar, while others have magical realism elements. The Locas series focuses on Maggie and Hopey, one of the first queer couples in the American comic book tradition. 

Title: Turey El Taíno
Country of origin: Puerto Rico
So when was it first published? 1989
Created by: Ricardo Álvarez-Rivón

Credit: n-14515802384n8gk. Digital image. Ilustra.org

A unique comic book in that it shows how an indigenous community, the Tainos of what is now Puerto Rico, lived before colonization by the Spanish. It shows the cultural richness of the island in pre-Columbus days and brings back indigenous words and tools. A real standout! 

Title: Elpidio Valdés
Country of origin: Cuba
So when was it first published? 1970
Created by: Juan Padrón

Credit: elpidio4(1). Digital image. Cuba Literaria

A true Cuban classic and perhaps the most famous comic book to come out of the island. In a truly nationalistic spirit (some might argue that these comic books are in fact propaganda), the story takes place in the nineteenth-century war of independence that Cubans waged against Spain. Elpidio Valdés is a multiplatform narrative, as there are movies and cartoons about this historical character.

READ: ‘La Borinqueña’ Is The Afro-Latina Superhero The Comic Book World Has Been Missing

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  1. Jay says:

    Miles morales is biracial