Entertainment

Twitter Is Asking Why Cardi B Can Say The N-Word But Gina Rodriguez Can’t And In Typical Cardi Fashion, She’s Got Some Thoughts

Last week, Gina Rodriguez rightfully received public backlash for saying the N-word on multiple occasions because she is not a black person, but the discourse seems to have spilled over to Cardi B (who is a black person) for her use of the N-word. Many people cannot conceive of the fact that some Latinxs are black and some of them are not. So many questions can be answered by visiting the public library or utilizing those Twitter fingers to do some online research, yet many of the loudest folks on the internet have a tenuous grasp or race and identity. 

Cardi B is accused of not being black again.

Cardi B was accused of not being black and saying the N-word. An issue that has been ongoing in her career as she has constantly asserted that she is Black and Latinx.  In February 2018 the “Bodak Yellow” sat down for a Teen Vogue interview with Zendaya, where she talked about the public’s confusion about her race and cultures. 

“One thing that always bothers me is that people know so little about my culture. We are Caribbean people. And a lot of people be attacking me because they feel like I don’t be saying that I’m black.” she told Zendaya. “Some people want to decide if you’re black or not, depending on your skin complexion, because they don’t understand Caribbean people or our culture. I don’t got to tell you that I’m black. I expect you to know it.”

Afro-Latinxs are constantly told they’re not black or Latinx enough. Love and Hip Hop Miami star Amara La Negra, an Afro-Latinx with dark skin and an Afro has had to defend her dual identity in the past as well. 

Cardi B defends her blackness once again.

When accused of not acting black she asked, “How do you act like a black woman? How do black women act?” 

Cardi B then shared a video defending her blackness yet again.

Cardi then shared a video from two years ago where she talked about how black publications have taught her about blackness and learning to love her natural hair. Other supporters noted that the reason why everyone is confused is because Latinx and black history is simply not taught well if at all in schools. 

“The majority of African captives were enslaved in Latin America & the Caribbean. folks don’t know these histories. the real question is how come? why do American educational institutions (k-12) do such a piss poor job teaching about race, slavery, settlement, and colonialism?” One Twitter user wrote.

Afro-Latinxs exist. Some Latinxs are black people. Say it again. Say it again. 

Cardi B is of Dominican and Trinidadian descent. These are two Caribbean nations with large black populations who are descendants of enslaved Africans. Nicki Minaj is also from Trinidad and Tobago and has a similar skin tone to Cardi B, yet her blackness is never called into question. 

Caribbeans, like many ethnicities that are colonial products, can be born in a spectrum of skin tones and features. Some of us are born black. Being black is a beautiful thing, but the social experience of a Latinx who looks like Celia Cruz is much different than one who looks like Gina Rodriguez. Afro-Latinxs have to navigate anti-black policies and anti-Latinx policies in ways that lighter-skinned Latinxs do not.

According to Pew Research, 1 in 4 Latinxs identify as Afro-Latinx and Latino Carribeans are more likely to identify as such.

“The multiple dimensions of Hispanic identity also reflect the long colonial history of Latin America, during which mixing occurred among indigenous Americans, white Europeans, slaves from Africa and Asians. In Latin America’s colonial period, about 15 times as many African slaves were taken to Spanish and Portuguese colonies than to the U.S. Today, about 130 million people of African descent live in Latin America.” 

The Afro-Latinx identity acknowledges the treatment of black Latinxs in the social construct of race relations, without erasing our Latinx heritage so that we no longer have to “choose” which fits best.

Can Latinxs say the N-word? 

Anyone who is a non-black person of color does not get a right to say the N-word. That includes non-black Latinxs. Having a small percentage of African ancestry does not make you a black person, it only means that your ancestors were black. 

To quote Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, “My identity is the descendant of many different identities. I am the descendant of African slaves. I am the descendant of Indigenous people. I am the descendant of Spanish colonizers… I am a descendant of all sorts of folks. That doesn’t mean I’m Black, that doesn’t mean I’m Native, but I can tell the story of my ancestors.”

If you would not be called the N-word by a racist then you do not get to reclaim it, period.  

Cardi B Spilled Knowledge And Acceptance In Support Of Dwyane Wade And Gabrielle Union’s Trans Child Zaya

Culture

Cardi B Spilled Knowledge And Acceptance In Support Of Dwyane Wade And Gabrielle Union’s Trans Child Zaya

iamcardib / dwyanewade / Instagram

Dwyane Wade and Gabrielle Union have been open and vocal about the support of their trans child Zaya. The discussion surrounding their child started in earnest when the parents posted photos with them during Miami Pride 2019. People have been weighing on the child’s gender identity and Cardi B recently shared her thoughts on the issue and fans are here for it.

Gabrielle Union and her husband Dwyane Wade are showing unconditional love and support for their trans child.

According to various studies, parental acceptance is an important factor in keeping LGBTQ+ youth safe and healthy. LGBTQ+ youth experience higher instances of mental, psychological, and physical trauma, including higher risks of HIV and AIDS infections. Parental acceptance and guidance can offset the known dangers for LGBTQ+ youth. Union and Wade’s support of Zaya is a crucial lesson for other parents with LGBTQ+ children.

The latest celebrity to weigh in on the conversation around Zaya is Cardi B.

The rapper, who has been accused of transphobic comments in the past, threw her full support behind Zaya and their parents. In 2018, Cardi B faced backlash after posting a transphobic meme to her Facebook account. Celebrity trans activists Laverne Cox and Angelica Ross weighed in on the meme calling Cardi B out for her use of the meme in light of the disproportionate murders facing Black trans women.

Yet, now it seems Cardi B is supporting the trans community with an Instagram video calling for support, acceptance, and love for Zaya.

“Let’s not forget that this is a kid. Let’s not forget that this kid could be very very sensitive. That’s 1,” Cardi B told fans in her Instagram video. “And, let me tell you something, right? I feel like people are saying that this kid is too young to transition but it’s like how old is too young? If you are born thinking that you are a girl in a boy’s body, how old do you have to be in order to keep knowing that that’s who you are? That’s who you are. That’s your identity. If that’s who you feel that you are, what is the age limit for you to know that that’s what you want to be?”

People on social media are cautiously celebrating Cardi B’s message.

Today’s cancel culture leaves a lot to be desired. It has become a common occurrence to see people canceled for having problematic views. Cardi B has been able to push forward with her career and has made history as a female rapper. She has long been criticized for her transphobic views and it now looks like Cardi B has changed her views.

“I seen a documentary before, not really a documentary but a long 18-minute video on YouTube way before this Zion situation about this 5-year-old little girl that at 5 years old she transitioned to be a girl,” Cardi B said in the video. “She knew that that’s what she wanted to be because she knew that. She liked to wear dresses. She likes to play with Barbies. And if you’re born like that, you’re forever going to be like that. Whether the age that you pick it to be, it’s your choice.”

For Cardi B, the most important thing is that people let people be happy and free, especially children.

Credit: @flyawaybutera / Twitter

“Let people find their happiness, especially kids. Let them feel comfortable doing what they want to be,” Cardi B says. “And it’s true. A lot of trans [people] that I know around me, like, when I ask them, ‘When did you know that you wanted to change?’ They say, ‘I’ve always felt like I was a girl. I always felt like I was a girl. I was born like this. People are born like this. Like the Lady Gaga song ‘I was born this way,’ like that sh-t is f-cking real.”

Her defense of Zaya and the Union-Wade family seems so genuine and real.

In another video clip circulating, Carid B is calling on people to try to be more open and understanding. Some people live in communities where they do not interact with people who are in the LGBTQ+ community or hold old thoughts towards the community. Cardi B wants those people to try to open their minds and understand that people living as their authentic self is nothing to attack.

Even some who do not like nor support Cardi B are siding with her on this one.

Credit: @PrettyGyalAj / Twitter

It’s hard not to support someone who is pushing for better acceptance of a marginalized community. This is something we can all get behind because love is love and love always wins.

READ: Fans Grow Frustrated With Cardi B After She Once Again Defends Offset From Cheating Allegations

Afro-Latina Journalist Gwen Ifill Will Be Honored As The Usps 43Rd Stamp In The Black Heritage Series

Fierce

Afro-Latina Journalist Gwen Ifill Will Be Honored As The Usps 43Rd Stamp In The Black Heritage Series

famu_spj / Instagram

The 43rd stamp in the Black Heritage series honors the late Afro-Latina boss woman, Gwen Ifill (1955–2016), one of America’s most esteemed journalists. The US Postal service stamp features a photo taken of the PBS News Hour co-anchor who sadly died in 2016. 

The stamp was unveiled just last week.

The stamp, which was unveiled last Tuesday, features a 2008 photo of Ifill with the words “BLACK HERITAGE” at the top and Ifill’s name at the bottom. It’s the 43rd stamp in the Black Heritage series and one of several new designs that will be issued next year.

Ifill was a pioneer for women and African Americans in journalism.

She become the first African American woman to host a major political talk show when she took the helm at PBS’s “Washington Week in Review.” “Gwen Ifill was a remarkable trailblazer who broke through gender and racial barriers,” shared Deputy Postmaster General Ronald A. Stroman at a dedication ceremony held for her at the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C.

The Deputy Postmaster went on to say, 

“The Postal Service is proud to celebrate Gwen’s contribution as a remarkable journalist with this beautiful commemorative Forever stamp. Gwen was truly a national treasure, and so richly deserving of today’s honor.” Gwen was a New York native of Panamanian and Barbadian descent who left behind an indelible journalistic legacy. Not only did she break down barriers on TV but she also worked for The New York Times and The Washington Post. Apart from her journalistic achievements, she also wrote the book The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama.

Ifill worked at the NewsHour for 17 years.

The anchor covered eight presidential campaigns and moderated two vice-presidential debates. She was also the moderator and managing editor of “Washington Week.”

Her brother shared a statement

“The Ifill family is thrilled that our sister, cousin, and aunt has received this signal tribute to her legacy as a truth-teller, pioneer and exemplar,” said Bert Ifill, Gwen’s brother and spokesperson for the family. “As a reporter and moderator, Gwen was dedicated to two principles: getting the story right and getting the right stories out. As a mentor, supportive friend, and family member, she was determined, not only to open doors for those of us previously locked out of opportunity but also to provide floor plans to help us find our way through. She is forever in our hearts, and we are forever in her debt.”