Entertainment

Spotify Dubbed Justin Bieber A ‘Latin King’ And People Called Them Out On It

It’s no secret that Luis Fonsi’s “Despacito” remix featuring Justin Bieber singing in Spanish is super popular. The crossover hit has broken records and continues to dominate the charts. However, many people were not happy with Bieber when he appeared to mock the song during a live performance. Bieber also admitted that he didn’t know the lyrics after fans asked him to sing it at a recent concert (they weren’t too happy about that either).

Regardless of how you feel about the popularity of the song or that Bieber sings in Spanish now (sort of), “Despacito” is a cultural phenomenon, so it’s not going anywhere for a while.

Last week, streaming service Spotify featured this sponsored post on Instagram:

Obviously, the post, which called Bieber a “Latin King,” pissed some people off.

Social justice activist Jeronimo Saldaña was one of the people who were extremely upset over the post, so he did something about it.

CREDIT: Mijente

In his petition for Spotify to take the sponsored post down, Saldaña writes: “Make no mistake about it— Justin Bieber is most definitely not a Latino. In fact, Bieber’s recent antics mocking the lyrics to ‘Despacito’ by singing gibberish instead of the actual Spanish words show a flagrant disregard for Latinxs and our culture. That’s why Spotify needs to learn some cultural competence before launching these types of ignorant ads campaigns. We want Spotify to pull this ad.”

Saldaña tells mitú that he was also upset about the fact that Spotify recently featured a playlist specifically for the anniversary of the Pulse shooting but didn’t have any Latinx artist on the playlist.

“So the Justin Bieber ad was just the last straw,” Saldaña said. “Our cultura is not for sale and recording one song in Spanish does not make you a ‘Latin King’ and most definitely does not define you as a Latino.”

Saldaña adds that “singing one song in Spanish doesn’t make you the king of a genre” and that he’s not sure what the label “Latin King” even means.

When asked which Latinx artists should be featured on Spotify, Saldaña said he likes Chicano Batman, Carla Morrison, and Rita Indiana.

mitú reached out to Spotify regarding their sponsored post and the petition, and this was their response:

“We made a creative decision to feature Justin Bieber in our ad because we wanted to celebrate ‘Despacito’ as key cultural moment when music genres crossover. We realized that this could be seen as culturally insensitive so we have pulled those ads.”

READ: The Score You Get On This Quiz Will Determine How Many Times You’ve Heard ‘Despacito’ On The Radio

What do you think of the Justin Spotify sponsored post? Let us know by sharing this story and commenting below!

Selena For Sanctuary Is Bringing Their Immigrant-Focused Concert Fundraiser To Los Angeles

Entertainment

Selena For Sanctuary Is Bringing Their Immigrant-Focused Concert Fundraiser To Los Angeles

empressof / mayainthemoment / Instagram

The free Selena-themed outdoor concert in support of immigration rights is going bi-coastal. After the success of their summer show headlined by Colombian-American star Kali Uchis in New York, the event is coming to Los Angeles. The organizer, artist manager, and activist, Doris Muñoz of Mija Management, is bringing the event to the West Coast just in time for LA’s Day of the Dead celebrations on Nov.1. 

Solidarity For Sanctuary is a non-profit aimed to amplify the voices of immigrant communities through music, advocacy, and the arts.

Credit: Forsanctuary / Instagram

Since 2017, Muñoz has been producing Selena for Sanctuary, a concert to help undocumented immigrants. Her mission remains to donate all proceeds from her concerts to undocumented people who need funds for legal fees, to submit DACA applications, etc. This year the entire proceeds of the show went to Make The Road NY. The organization’s mission is to provide “legal and survival services,” develop “transformative education,” and help with “community organizing.” 

“When our parents can barely afford to take a day off of work to go to the lawyer’s office, how are they even going to pay that lawyer,” Muñoz told Remezcla. “I think in the Donald Trump era, we’re sometimes afraid of who we’re talking to and having a brown body, you can feel like a target,” Muñoz added. “To be in a safe space like this, surrounded by people who believe in fighting for your community with you, is really beautiful.” 

Sanctuary for Selena is set to take place on Los Angeles’ iconic Grand Park. 

Credit: ignacio_gallego / Instagram

The concert will be taking place on the first of November, just in time for Downtown L.A.’s Día de los Muertos celebrations. Angelenos will celebrate the ancient party of the dead with a week of altars, remembrance, and traditions that will be wrapped up on the last day, with free music performances by an all Latina lineup.

Organizers of the event took to Instagram to announce the LA-based Selena for Sanctuary.

Credit: forsanctuary / Instagram

The non-profit Solidarity for Sanctuary announced the West Coast concert and lineup on an Instagram post. “We can’t wait to see our friends, family, and community gathered at @grandpark_la for this year’s Grand Park’s Downtown Dia de los Muertos!” read the colorful post featuring an illustration of Selena wearing her iconic high rise pants and bedazzled bustier, surrounded by cempasúchil, the flower of the dead. “On Friday, November 1st Selena for Sanctuary will be taking over in front of City Hall for a free concert featuring an all-female line-up of L.A.-based Latinx artists and SO much more, welcoming immigrants and allies together in celebration and solidarity. It’s an honor to be at Grand Park, a place that along with @musiccenterla has made it their mission to provide a packed calendar of thoughtful and exciting cultural events for all Angelinos to enjoy.”

The aim of Selena for Sanctuary is to raise money and awareness for immigrant issues that are impacting millions of lives. 

Credit: @_forsanctuary / Twitter

Born of a series of benefit concerts she put together in Southern California in 2017 called Solidarity for Sanctuary, Muñoz’s dance parties raise funds to help immigrants navigate the bureaucratic minefield that is U.S. immigration policy to set them on the path to citizenship.  In June, the NYC party was headlined by Kali Uchis, the Colombian-American singer with a critically acclaimed debut LP (2018’s Isolation) and collaborations with Gorillaz, Juanes, and Daniel Caesar. The platform must have liked having women at the front of the lineup, so they’ve confirmed an all-female lineup for the event in L.A. which is great news for the Latina artists.

Here’s the line-up of the concert and it is pretty lit.

Credit: Giphy

It is all about the female empowerment with some of the best Latina acts in the music industry. Here’s who will be shining at the Selena for Sanctuary concert.

Empress Of

Credit: empressof / Instagram

The Honduran-American Lorely Rodriguez will be headlining in LA’s Selena for Sanctuary. Empress Of shifts from English to Spanish to express the vulnerability that lies in both languages. The East LA native will be heading back home to LA for the show, after a long tour of the US.

Ceci Bastida

Credit: cecibastida / Instagram

This Tijuana native is a ska and punk veteran. Bastida broke into the scene plating keyboard and vocals for the political band Tijuana No.1. These days, Ceci is off on her own. Nowadays, she has a new alt-pop sound with a hint of Tijuana No.1’s political energy. 

 San Cha

Credit: el_sancha / Instagram

San Cha’s sound is a mix of ranchera, cumbia and punk. She is reinventing traditional Mexican sounds and injecting them with her own identity as a queer brown woman. 

Maya Murillo

Credit: mayainthemoment / Instagram

Better known as Pero Like’s “Pocha Concha,” Murillo is a multi-talented singer and songwriter. She is most comfortable singing covers which she has shared on YouTube in the past. No wonder Selena for Sanctuary tapped her to sing a Selena song at the event. 

Loyal Lobos

Credit: loyal.lobos / Instagram

For Andrea Silva, the woman behind Loyal Lobos, this event’s mission is very close to her heart. Born in Colombia, Silva immigrated to the US as a child. She often references her experiences as an immigrant and as a feminist in her music. 

August Eve

Credit: augusteverios / Instagram

August Eve had already collaborated with another Selena for Sanctuary headliner, Empress Of. The LA native is taking the stage herself this time with her Old Hollywood-style music.

READ: ‘Selena For Sanctuary’ Is The Free Concert In NYC All About Helping The Immigrant Community

This Man Is Using TikTok To Bring Younger People To Old-School Jams And His Fans Are Loving It

Entertainment

This Man Is Using TikTok To Bring Younger People To Old-School Jams And His Fans Are Loving It

@Doggface208 / TikTok

Everyone has that embarrassing uncle. The one who busts out dancing in public, or makes incredibly old-school dad jokes. Embarrassing uncles keep you guessing what they’ll do next and oftentimes you and your cousins are embarrassed by his bizarre behavior. If you can’t think of an embarrassing uncle, chances are it’s you, you’re the embarrassing uncle or tía. This Mexican man from Wyoming is the quintessential embarrassing uncle, except the internet, unlike your cousins, is loving every minute of his antics. 

Tío TikTok might be a little older than the app’s intended audience, but he still managed to make his content go viral, even when he didn’t even know what TikTok was.

Credit: @Doggface208 / TikTok

Tío TikTok aka Nathan Apodaca is the grown man who’s single-handedly bringing Gen-Z app TikTok, to Millennials. If you’re wondering what TikTok is, don’t worry. It is basically the second-coming of Vine. It is all about short videos that play in a loop for everyone to enjoy. 

Remember Musical.ly? Maybe you remember the times of Vine? It’s hard to keep up with the constantly changing social media landscape as some apps gain notoriety, others merge, and even more die out. As non-members of the Gen Z generation, it’s even harder to keep it all straight.

The old app Musical.ly was rebranded as TikTok and it’s quickly become Gen Z’s app of choice.

If you do remember Musical.ly, you may know that in August 2018, it rebranded as TikTok. And Vine? That app was the victim of an ever-changing internet and suffered a slow death, causing users to feel the dejection of media abandonment. TikTok though has stirred up a revival of short video clips. Only now, it’s even more interactive, collaborative, and downright addictive.

Apodaca was introduced to the app by his Gen Z daughters, and his videos soon went viral.

Tío TikTok was unaware of the popular video-app himself. His daughters, Makyla and Angelia, are the ones who first introduced Apocada’s to the platform. His youngest daughter even helped him film his first video, which quickly went viral. Apodaca confesses that he was stumped as to what to do, or what type of content to publish on his app, but his eldest daughter came to the rescue and suggested he did his usual goofy dances on camera. And just like that, Apodaca turned into a TikTok sensation.

Tío TikTok’s 16-second videos are simple and hilarious, and they touch a chord with young audiences for their humor.

Credit: @Doggface208 / TikTok

Apodaca shares 16-second bite-sized clips of himself dancing and performing to a tune. His perfectly in-sync interpretations, have gained him nearly 90 thousand followers. Tío TikTok usually jams out to classic ’90s gangsta rap like DMX, Dr. Dre, Eminem or Twista and Gen Z-ers and Millennials alike, can’t seem to get enough of his nostalgic vibes.

In his video’s he’s usually goofing around at work or high off weed which has made his content recognizable.

In one of his most liked posts, Nathan is seen sitting on a conveyor belt lip-syncing Sublime’s ’90s classic hit ‘Santeria’ at the factory where he works and films most of his videos. The post earned 26.9 thousand likes and received thousands of hilarious comments like “*OSHA has entered the chat*” by @BertoBitch or “The workers that package for WISH…”

Apodaca is the stoner uncle you never knew you needed on social media.

His hashtags regularly include 420, 710, ‘high’ and ‘gogreen’, stoner terms used to celebrate dabs and cannabis concentrates. His song choices, usually pulled from an unpredictably random selection, often celebrate the plant too. @Doggface208 aka Nathan Apodaca loves weed so much that he, ingeniously, linked his PayPal account on his TikTok bio for donations; “Now accepting donations 4 Flower 🍃 n white Ts PayPal apodacadogg208@gmail.com” reads his profile description. Whether the account is real or not, we’re not sure, but you’re welcome to send a little donation and let us know.

Most TikTok users may be under 30 according to Apple Store download stats, but we’re sure that this guy’s hilarious videos will attract an older demographic to download the app too.

READ: This 11-Year-Old Latina Has Thousands Of Followers On TikTok And The Most Hilarious Sense Of Humor About Latinidad