Entertainment

J Balvin Offers Up A Message To Fans About The Real Dangers Of Covid-19

Updated August, 17, 2020.

J Balvin is the latest celebrity to come forward with a Covid-19 diagnosis. He is part of a running list of Latino celebrities who are warning fans about the virus.

J Balvin has a message for all of his fans about the seriousness and dangers of Covid-19.

“At the moment, I’m just getting better,” J Balvin said in a recorded messages for the Premios Juventud. “These have been very difficult days, very complicated. Sometimes we won’t think that we’ll get it, but I got it and I got it bad.”

He added: “My message to those that follow me, young fans and people in general is to take care. This isn’t a joke. The virus is real and it’s dangerous”

Updated August 13, 2020.

Covid-19 is not done and we are seeing the proof everywhere we turn. Months after the pandemic, more and more people continue to fall ill with the virus and Antonio Banderas joins the pack.

Antonio Banderas shared the news on social media that he tested positive on his 60th birthday.

The iconic Spanish actor had recently celebrated his girlfriend’s 39th birthday before testing positive. Europe is currently dealing with a second wave from Covid-19 and officials are becoming concerned by the spread.

In his post, Banderas talked to his fans about the illness and how he didn’t feel sick, just more tired than normal. Yet, Banderas added: “I will take advantage of this isolation to read, write and rest, continue making plans to begin to give meaning to my newly released 60 years to which came loaded with desire and illusion. Big hugs to everyone.”

Banderas did not explain how he contracted the infectious disease, that as of 13 August 2020, has seen over 20.6 million cases reported across 188 countries. So far, the disease has killed more than 749,000 people.

Last year, Banderas (who is known for his roles in The Mask Of Zorro and The Spy Kids franchise) was nominated for an Oscar for his film “Pain and Glory.”

Original: As beaches, restaurants, and even bars and clubs started to reopen, it was easy to forget that we are still in the midst of a global health crisis – one that continues to hit the Latino community, in particular, very hard. And stars, they really are just like us. Celebrities are also at risk of contracting Covid-19 and over the last few days, we’ve learned that several of Latin music’s biggest stars have in fact been infected with the virus.

The news comes just as states like Florida, California, Arizona, and Texas set new records with sky-high infection rates. It’s an important reminder that nobody is immune to this pandemic and that we all need to do our part to keep our communities safe.

Several major Latin music stars have recently announced they’ve tested positive for Covid-19.

As if a reminder that stars, they’re just like us, several of Latin music’s biggest celebrities have announced that they’ve tested positive for Covid-19. Karol G, Prince Royce, and Chiquita Rivera have all shared their positive diagnosis for the virus and are urging fans to stay home and use masks when they have to go out.

Karol G took to Instagram Live to share the news of her infection with her fans.

During an Instagram live watched by more than 100,000, the “Tusa” singer said that she tested positive two or three weeks ago but had not made it public so her parents wouldn’t worry. “First of all, thank you to all the people that have reached out to me. I hadn’t said anything because my parents are far away and I didn’t want them to worry about me,” she says.

“Because my new single was coming out, I didn’t want coronavirus to be the news. Now that the news is out, my parents are very nervous and if it was under any other circumstance, they’d be here by my side.”

Karol G went on to say that she is feeling well compared to others who have been diagnosed positive. She was diagnosed with COVID-19 a few weeks ago with her friend and sister, and decided to isolate away from Anuel, who she confirmed tested negative. “I feel well. Today, I got another test and hoping this one will be negative.”

Chiquita Rivera also announced that her and her husband have also tested positive for the virus.

Just last week, Mexican-American singer Chiquis Rivera, the daughter of the late Jenni Rivera, revealed she and her husband Lorenzo Méndez tested positive for COVID-19. Also in an Instagram video, Rivera said “We’re contagious so we have to be responsible and we are going to quarantine.”

And Dominican Prince Royce announced he too had contracted Covid-19.

Prince Royce was one of the first celebrities to reveal his diagnosis. he shared he had tested positive for the virus shortly before the 4th of July holiday weekend and urged people to take precautions and be safe – for themselves and others.

In an Instagram video, he shared that he had gone out to restaurants since things had started to open up. He added: “Well, Florida hasn’t been so bad, and New York is the one with the problem. I fell for that and I think many people can fall for that and will fall for that. Don’t be selfish and make the same mistakes that I probably did.”

He urged his fans to do the responsible thing and stay at home.

“I was diagnosed with COVID-19 and I am on day number 12 since my symptoms began,” he wrote on Instagram. “My case has been mild and I am feeling well. I share this with you today to ask you please not let down your guard — this virus is very real and we can have it and spread it without even knowing. I didn’t think I had it as I didn’t feel that bad and had I not gotten tested I would be spreading it to others.”

His caption also added, “For younger people, this is more than just about taking care of ourselves, it is about taking care of others, older people and those with compromised immune systems. Please let’s take this seriously and act responsibly and with compassion. Let’s all take care of each other.”

Their infections come as the virus is raging out of control across the country.

New records are being set everyday across the United States, as severe all states see the virus rage out of control. For the first time ever in the U.S., Florida saw more than 15,000 new cases in just one day. Meanwhile, in Arizona – the per capita infection rate is higher than it was at the peak of New York’s battle against the virus.

As of July 15, the U.S. has 3.48 million confirmed cases and almost 140,000 deaths due to Covid-19 infection. Those numbers are expected to continue to climb as many Americans refuse to follow simple preventive measures, including wearing a mask and staying at home.

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Imagine Having Machu Picchu All To Yourself – That’s What One Man Got After Being Stuck In Peru For Seven Months

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Imagine Having Machu Picchu All To Yourself – That’s What One Man Got After Being Stuck In Peru For Seven Months

Gustavo Basso / Getty Images

One of the most dreaded side effects of the global Coronavirus pandemic, is that it took with it our travel plans. Whether we were simply set to have weekends at the beach, visit our abuelos in Mexico, or go on a once-in-a-lifetime trip across the world, so many of us have seen our travel plans taken away.

Well, one traveler made it across the world to fulfill his lifelong dream of seeing Machu Picchu but as soon as he arrived, so too did the pandemic. He became stuck in foreign country and couldn’t travel or see the sights he had hoped to visit.

As Peru has slowly reopened, this now world-famous traveler is being known as the first person to see Machu Picchu post-lockdown and he got to do so all by himself.

One lucky traveler got to experience the city of Machu Picchu all by himself.

Peru’s famous Machu Picchu ruins, closed for months due to the coronavirus pandemic, reopened on Monday for one lucky Japanese tourist after he spent months stranded in the country due to global travel restrictions.

In a video first reported by The Guardian, Jesse Takayama shared his immense gratitude for being allowed to visit the ancient Incan city – which had long been one of his dreams. Months ago he had arrived in a small town near the Incan city, where he has remained ever since because of Covid-19 restrictions.

Peru’s Minister of Culture, Alejandro Neyra, said at a press conference that “He [Takayama] had come to Peru with the dream of being able to enter. The Japanese citizen has entered together with our head of the park so that he can do this before returning to his country.” Talk about a once in a lifetime experience.

Neyra went on to add that this really was a rare moment and that Takayama only received access after submitting a special request to the local tourism authority.

In an Instagram post about his special access, Takayama said that “Machu Picchu is so incredible! I thought I couldn’t go but many people asked the government. I’m the first one to visit Machu Picchu after lockdown!”

Takayama had been stuck in Peru since March when the country shut down its borders because of the pandemic.

Takayama arrived to Peru in March and promptly bought his pass to the ancient city but little did he know the world (and his plans) would come to a screeching halt. Peru was hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic (and continues to struggle) and was forced to close its borders and institute a strict lockdown.

Peru was forced to implement drastic COVID-19 restrictions on travel including an end to all incoming international flights earlier this year, which only relaxed this month after the nation’s rate of new COVID-19 cases began declining in August.

The last statement posted on the Machu Picchu website, dated from July, says that “the Ministries of Culture and Foreign Trade and Tourism are coordinating the prompt reopening of Machu Picchu”.

Peru’s Machu Picchu is one of the world’s most visited tourist attractions.

The country’s Minister of Culture, Neyra, stressed that “the reopening of Machu Picchu is important for Peruvians, as a symbol of national pride and also as a budget issue, because it is one of the places that generates the most income for the culture sector.”

The BBC reports that the Inca stronghold, a Unesco world heritage site since 1983, is expected to reopen at reduced capacity next month. 

More than 1.5 million people make the pilgrimage to the Inca city annually. In 2017, Unesco threatened to place the famous ruins on its list of endangered heritage sites because of fears about overcrowding; Peruvian authorities subsequently brought in measures to control the flow of tourists and visitor numbers were capped at around 2,240 per day.

Peru is still experiencing one of the region’s worst outbreaks of Coronavirus.

After beginning a phased reopening, Peru has started to see its contagion rate increase in recent days. The country still faces one of the worst outbreaks in South America, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

“We are still in the middle of a pandemic,” Neyra added. “It will be done with all the necessary care.”

Peru has recorded just over 849,000 total cases of COVID-19, and 33,305 deaths since the pandemic began.

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The Number Of Latinos In The U.S Killed By Covid-19 Surpasses 44,500 With No Signs Of Slowing Down

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The Number Of Latinos In The U.S Killed By Covid-19 Surpasses 44,500 With No Signs Of Slowing Down

Wilfredo Lee / Getty Images

For months we have heard stories from our neighbors and our friends of people losing loved ones to Covid-19. It seems that with each passing day the degrees of separation from ourselves and the virus gets smaller and smaller.

Although this is true for all demographics, it’s particularly true for the Latino community. New data shows that although Latinos make up about 19% of the national population, we account for nearly a third of all deaths. These numbers are staggering and experts are warning that entire communities are being decimated by the pandemic.

More than 44,500 Latinos have died of Covid-19 in the United States.

It’s no secret that the Coronavirus has ravaged our community but now we have concrete numbers that show just how bad the pandemic has been among Latinos. According to new data from the COVID Tracking Project, over 44,500 of the nearly 211,000 people in the U.S. killed by the Coronavirus to date are Latino.

While Latinos are under 19 percent of the U.S. population, we make up almost one-third of Coronavirus deaths nationwide, according to CDC data analyzed by Salud America, a health research institute in San Antonio. Among some age groups, like those 35 to 44, the distribution of Latino Covid deaths is almost 50 percent; among Latinos ages 45-54, it’s almost 44 percent.

Experts say several factors account for higher COVID-19 death and infection rates among Latinos versus whites, including poverty, health care disparities, the prevalence of serious underlying medical conditions, and greater exposure to the virus at work because of the kinds of working-class, essential jobs many Latinos have.

Many Latinos who have been infected or died of the Coronavirus are front-line or essential workers.

Credit: Wilfredo Lee / Getty Images

So many of our family members and neighbors work jobs that are now considered “essential.” From building cleaning services, to restaurant workers, grocery store employees, nurses, and farm workers, our community is on the front lines more than any other community in this fight against the pandemic.

In fact, 41.2 percent of all front-line workers are Black, Hispanic or Asian-American/Pacific Islander, according to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, an economic policy think tank. Hispanics are especially overrepresented in building cleaning services (40.2 percent of workers).

Latinos also have the highest uninsured rates of any racial or ethnic group in the U.S., according to the Department of Health and Human Services. All of these factors add up to a dangerous and deadly combination that has resulted in the outsized number of deaths among Latinos.

Some are saying that the virus is causing the ‘historic decimation’ of Latinos.

Speaking at a virtual Congressional Hispanic Caucus meeting last week, a global health expert warned that the Coronavirus is causing “the historic decimation” of the Latino community, ravaging generations of loved ones in Hispanic families.

To illustrate his point, Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of Tropical Medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, read off descriptions of people who died on Aug. 13 in Houston alone.

“Hispanic male, Hispanic male, Hispanic male, black male, Hispanic male, black male, Hispanic male, Hispanic female, black female, black male, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic” Hotez said, adding that many are people in their 40s, 50s and 60s.

“This virus is taking away a whole generation of mothers and fathers and brothers and sisters, you know, who are young kids, teenage kids. And it occurred to me that what we’re seeing really is the historic decimation among the Hispanic community by the virus,” he said.

Dr. Anthony Fauci – a popular figure in the fight against Coronavirus – has also raised the alarm.

The nation’s leading infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, gave a recent update on the impact on the Latino community. He pointed out that hospitalizations among Latinos 359 per 100,000 compared to 78 in whites. Deaths related to Covid-19 are 61 per 100,000 in the Latino population compared to 40 in whites, and Latinos represent 45 percent of deaths of people younger than 21, Fauci said.

Fauci said the country can begin to address this “extraordinary problem” now by making sure the community gets adequate testing and immediate access to care. But he said this is not a one-shot resolution.

“This must now reset and re-shine a light on this disparity related to social determinants of health that are experienced by the Latinx community — the fact that they have a higher incidence of co-morbidities, which put you at risk,” Fauci said.

Fauci also urged the Latino congressional members on the call to get their Latino constituents to consider enrolling in vaccination trials so they can be proven to be safe in everyone, including African Americans and Latinos.

“We need to get a diverse representation of the population in the clinical trials,” he said.

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