Entertainment

23 Tragic Latino Deaths You Won’t Forget

When death comes to soon or unexpectedly, it’s hard to cope with the memories and figures that are taken away. Here are 23 influential Latino deaths, from singers and actors, to athletes and activists that were taken from the world way too soon.

1. Selena Quintanilla

CREDIT: Credit: legendselenaquintanilla / Instagram

The Tejano Grammy winner remains one of the best selling artists of all time even years after her death. To fans she was known as “The Queen of Tejano Music”, sadly her success was stopped short when she met an untimely death at the hands of a disgruntled former president of her fan club, Yolanda Saldivar who shot her.  Gun violence man.

2.  Héctor Lavoe “El Cantante de los Cantantes”

CREDIT: Credit: Wikipedia

Héctor Lavoe AKA “El Rockero de la Salsa” jumped off the ninth floor of the Regency Hotel Condado in Puerto Rico. But his life didn’t end there, over the years his health deteriorated due to  AIDS. He died on June 29, 1993 in New York City.

3. Freddy Prinze

CREDIT: 2012 Silver Screen Collection

Prinze battled depression for years before he took his own life. On January 28, 1977 at the pique of his success on Chico and The Man, the 22 year old actor shot himself in front of his manager.

4. Hernán Gaviria

CREDIT: Credit: diariosdefutbol.com

The soccer star who played midfielder for the Colombian national team took part in n both the 1992 Summer Olympics and the 1994 FIFA World Cup in the US. On October 24th, 2002, while practicing with his team Gaviria was struck by lightning and killed instantly.

5. Víctor Yturbide

Víctor Yturbe was a Mexican singer lovingly  known by fans as “El Pirulí.” On November 28, 1987 the musician was murdered outside of his own home in Atizapan de Zaragoza. While entering the door to his home, the actor was shot by an unknown killer.

6. Nino Bravo

CREDIT: Credit: Web Oficial de Nino Bravo

Bravo’s voice remains commemorated and listened to even in the years that have passed since his death. In 1973 the then 28 year old was involved in an accident 62 miles southeast of Madrid. Bravo died on his way to the hospital from his injuries.

7. Facundo Cabral

CREDIT: Credit: famouscomposers.net

Facundo Cabral was a singer and songwriter from Argentina. While touring in Guatemala City he was shot and killed on July 9, 2011. The murder was found to be “a planned attack.”

8. Pedro Infante

CREDIT: Credit: Full Speed Ahead (1951 film)

As one of Mexicos most celebrated actors and singers of all times, Infante’s death was one that completely shook the community. The passionate aviator had been co-piloting an aircraft when it crashed only five minutes after it took off.

9. Jenni Rivera

CREDIT: Credit: jennirivera / Instagram

Another Latina star  taken too soon, Rivera was a wildly successful singer, actress and entrepreneur. At the age of 43 the actress and singer had been on a flight en route to Toluca when it crashed.

10. Carlos Gardel

CREDIT: Credit: carlos_gardel_official / Instagram

Perhaps the most prominent figure in tango, Gardel was a singer and musician. He also died in a tragic plane crash, this one in Colombia.

11. Marielle Franco

CREDIT: Credit: marielle_franco / Instagram

The Brazilian pelican and human rights activist was fierce fighter for feminism and human rights. In 2018, the politician had been driving in a car on her way to deliver a speech when her car was shot multiple times.

12. Miguel Fuentes

CREDIT: Credit: latintimes.com

The Puerto Rican baseball pitcher played professionally for the former MLB team the Seattle Pilots. During the Winter League, Fuentes was in Puerto Rico and found himself caught up in an altercation at a bar in Loiza Aldea. After being shot three times the player later died from his wounds at a nearby hospital.

13. Néstor Chávez

Néstor Chávez pitched for the Giants in 1967 and was considered to be one of the most promising pitchers in the Giants organization.  On March 16, 1969, Chávez was on a flight headed to the United States for the minors when the plane, Viasa Flight 742, struck multiple power lines on take off. Eighty-four people onboard were killed.

14. Cesar Chavez

CREDIT: Credit: biography.com

Cesar Chavez died over 20 years ago but to this day remains one of the most well known Latinos in history. The labor rights fighter died in 1993 due to unknown natural causes.

15. Ramon Novarro

CREDIT: Credit: kissedwithaseal / Instagram

The Mexican stage and television actor had a career in silent films that made him a leading man in top box office attractions. In 1968 the actor was murdered by two brothers Paul (22) and Tom (17) Ferguson at his home in Laurel Canyon. Convinced the actor had a large sum of money on his estate, the two tortured Navarro for hours to convince him to reveal where the money was hidden. Novaro died of asphyxiation.

15. José Oliva

José Oliva was the St. Louis Cardinals thid baseman from 1994 to 1995. The Dominican was killed in 1997 when his car overturned and hit a tree.

16. Fernando Pascoal Neves

Fernando Pascoal Neves a.k.a. “Pavão” played a central midfielder for the F.C. Porto a Portuguese club. Pavão was in the middle of a match against Setubal in 1973, when he passed to his teammate and collapsed to the ground.  He never got up and his death was ruled a heart attack.

17. Geremi González

CREDIT: Credit: terryespina / Instagram

The Venezuelan pitcher was a successful pitcher for the Chicago Cubs, Tampa Bay Rays, Boston Red Sox, New York Mets, and Milwaukee Brewers. In May 25, 2008, he was struck by lightning while visiting Punta Palma, Zulia.

18. Eva Perón

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The controversial and beloved figure from Argentina. Eva died at 33 due to complications from a hysterectomy.

19. Joaqquim Agostinho

CREDIT: Credit: correiodabeiraserra.com

Joaqquim Agostinho was a Portuguese cyclists. On May 10, 1984, Agostinho was 400 meters away from taking first place at the Tour of the Algarve. Less than 100 meters to the finish line, a dog ran onto the course and collided with the cyclist. Agostinho (who was not wearing a helmet) flew off of his bicycle and hit his head on pavement. The cyclist got to his feet, and finished the race on his bicycle, but hours later he slipped into a coma and never woke up.

20. Octaviano Larrazolo

CREDIT: Credit: anthony_eredia / Instagram

The U.S. first Latino senator was born in 1859 in Allende, Mexico. Soon after taking office he fell ill and died just six months into his term.

21. Las Mariposas

CREDIT: Credit: lorpop3 / Instagram

Patria, Minerva, and Maria Teresa Mirabal were three sisters who were activists against the Rafael Truijilo dictatorship. They were assassinated on November 25, 1960.


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COVID-19 Deaths Among Young Latinos Are Skyrocketing And It’s Having Major Impacts On Our Community

Things That Matter

COVID-19 Deaths Among Young Latinos Are Skyrocketing And It’s Having Major Impacts On Our Community

JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

In what seems like a never ending saga and yet a blink of an eye at the same time, 2020 has been a devastating year for so many. The Coronavirus pandemic has snaked its way through the lives of Latinos across the country, leaving illness, sorrow, pain, and death in its wake.

Few communities have been as impacted by the pandemic as the Latino community. As of Dec. 23, Covid-19 had killed more than 54,000 Latinos, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s COVID Tracking Project, which acknowledges that its numbers are incomplete.

So many of our tíos and primos, even our own mothers and fathers, work in jobs that are considered essential and they’re bearing the brunt of the pandemic’s toll on workers.

Meanwhile, the virus has destroyed the foundations built by our families through hard work to give us – the younger generation – a better future.

Young Latinos are being hit particularly hard by the latest surge in COVID-19 deaths.

It was obvious from the beginning of the pandemic that those already worse off were going to be most impacted by the virus. And that’s exactly what happened. Covid-19 thrived on many Latinos’ roles as “essential workers” and it exploited the long-standing gaps compared to white Americans in income, education and access to health care.

The virus immediately had an outsized impact on our community, since so many of us suffer from higher rates of diabetes, hypertension and higher rates of obesity while having less savings and lower wealth, as well as limited business capital.

Meanwhile, the virus has worked to undo generations of progress made by our families in making sure that younger Latinos have strong foundations to work toward a better economic standing.

Gabriel Sanchez, of the University of New Mexico Center for Social Policy, told NBC News that “The only state where Latinos are not overrepresented in cases and casualties is in New Mexico, and that is because Native Americans have been hammered.”

An even more shocking truth is that Covid-19 has been more deadly for young Latinos than other racial groups. Latinos have the greatest share of deaths in age groups under 54, according to CDC data, while among whites, the greatest share of deaths has occurred in age groups over 65.

So many young Latinos work in jobs that are now considered essential and can’t stay home.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, young and working-age adults were hit hard. Covid-19 spread like wildfire in many of the fields that os many young Latinos work in: service industries, farm work, meat plant workers, grocery stores, and healthcare. This grim reality is reflected in the data.

Among Americans who are 35 to 44, almost half (48.9 percent) of those who died were Latino, compared to 27.3 percent of Black people and 15.5 percent of whites, according to an analysis of 226,240 deaths using CDC data.

By contrast, in the 65-74 age group, 45.3 percent killed by Covid-19 were white, 24.7 percent were Black and 23.1 percent were Latino.

For many families, the pandemic has turned back the progress made by earlier generations.

Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The pandemic and the death it’s brought along with it, has undone so much of the valuable progress made by our families. Before Covid-19 hit, our community had bounced back from the economic blow of the Great Recession.

In fact, between 2016 and 2019, wealth among Latino and Black families grew faster than that of other groups, though they still had far to go to catch up to white families, whose median family wealth last year was $188,200, compared to $36,100 for Hispanics and $24,100 for Blacks.

Before the pandemic, Latino unemployment was at 4 percent, but then soared to 19 percent in April. It fell back to 8.4 percent in November, but it’s still double the pre-pandemic rate.

Latino businesses were the engine driving small-business growth, and some had been adding jobs until the pandemic hit. Now, more jobs have been lost in several industry sectors with disproportionately higher rates of Latino-owned businesses — such as food services — than in the private sector overall, according to the Urban Institute.

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Maluma And J Balvin React To The Loss Of Armando Manzanero, Who Lost His Battle Against COVID-19

Entertainment

Maluma And J Balvin React To The Loss Of Armando Manzanero, Who Lost His Battle Against COVID-19

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As if 2020 and Coronavirus haven’t taken enough from us, just days before we usher in a new year, the world is forced to say goodbye to Armando Manzanero.

The famed Mexican-Mayan artist lost his battle against COVID-19 and as news of his death began to circulate, reactions from stars all around the world have started to pour in.

Manzanero died like so many in 2020 – fighting the dangerous Coronavirus.

One of Mexico’s most iconic and beloved artists has passed at the age of 85 from complications related to COVID-19. Armando Manzanero had tested positive for the virus on December 17 and put into critical care just a few days later.

The Society of Authors and Composers of Mexico (SACM), of which Manzanero was president, announced his death, saying: “The romantic soul of Mexico and the world is in mourning.”

His family told Mexican newspaper El Universal that he was set to be extubated in the coming days, after his lung health had improved, but he then died by cardiac arrest.

Maluma took to social media to share his sadness over the immense loss.

Losing a man who is considered a symbol of Latin American music has left many artists shocked and in mourning. Reactions and memories from around the world quickly poured in to remember the man who helped put his country and culture on the global map.

Maluma shared to Instagram an emotional post, where he expressed his sadness for the departure of maestro Manzanero, “💔😭 RIP MASTER,” the post reads.

In the description, Maluma said “one of my greatest inspirations” had died but that he’d forever treasure the memory of having met Manzanero. The video shows when Maluma, visibly moved, meets Armando Manzanero for the first time. “A pleasure to meet you,” says the reggaetonero; Immediately afterwards, the Mexican singer hugs him while patting him on the back.

J Balvin also shared his condolences while also condemning COVID-19.

Another of the many celebs who showed their sadness over the death of the star was J Balvin. In his Instagram stories, Balvin posted a photo of Manzanero and wrote “Rest in peace, Armando Manzanero.” In addition, he wrote what so many of us are feeling after such a devastating year: “FUCK COVID.”

And Mexico’s president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, addressed Manzanero’s death during a press conference, per CNN. “Armando Manzanero was a sensitive man, a man of the people. That’s why I lament his death,” he said. “He was also a great composer.”

Manzanero was a famed Mexican-Mayan artist who helped bring visibility to his culture and community.

Credit: Medios Y Media / Getty Images

Manzanero was a romantic crooner who was often covered by artists from around the world. In fact, many of his tracks were translated into English and performed byartists including Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley and Perry Como, and he was awarded a lifetime achievement Grammy in 2014.

He has since written more than 400 songs and released more than 30 albums, including nine since 2001, as Manzanero collaborated with a younger generation of Spanish-language romantic pop singers such as Alejandro Sanz, Luis Miguel and Lucero.

Manzanero’s impact on Latin music, especially romantic “bolero” songs, was widely recognized during his lifetime. He received Lifetime Achievement Awards from both the Latin Grammys in 2010 and the Grammys in 2014. Earlier this year, the Billboard Latin Music Awards recognized him with a Lifetime Achievement Award, with musicians including Luis Fonsi and Pablo Alborán performing a medley of hits as Manzanero accompanied on piano.

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