Entertainment

21 Latina Owned Beauty Products You Need

If you grew up Latinx, you were either stealing your mama’s makeup and glamming yourself up en secreto or were trying to hide your rage as they used you as their personal Barbie. If you’re reading this now, though, you probably have the freedom to makeup and express yourself however you like, so why not use Latinx owned beauty products?

Stereotypes aside, Latinxs are innovative, creative and starting up businesses left and right. Ship them.

1. Beauty Blender

Latina Owned Beauty Products
CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Allure. 16 May 2018.

Rea Ann Silva started out as an on-set special effects makeup artist and noticed a gap in the tools available to her. Naturally, como una reina, she debuted this tear-shaped sponge in 2003 and it’s become a staple in all our makeup drawers.

2. Yaocihuatl Organic Skin Care

CREDIT: @yaocihuatlorganic / Instagram

This entire line is organic and vegan and is inspired by plant-based medicine and ancient beauty traditions. This Cayenne Rub is used for sore muscles and arthritis relief by using natural heat to warm up sore spots for a little relief.

Think of this as our ancestor’s version of Vaporú.

3. Kat Von D Beauty

CREDIT: @katvondbeauty / Instagram

Mexicana Kat Von D first made her claim to fame as a tattoo artist, and since launching her cruelty-free, vegan line of badass beauty products, her style has gone mainstream. Find her products at Sephora.

Pro tip: The felt tip black liner will snag you the perfect wing eye.

4. Tata Harper

CREDIT: @tataharperskincare / Instagram

After her stepfather was diagnosed with skin cancer, she knew that she couldn’t trust a company to care if its ingredients were harmful. She has since launched a line of products that are entirely chemical free and organic.

In 2015, Forbes called her the “Queen of the Green Skincare Movement.” I bow down.

5. Sweet Face by Rocio

CREDIT: @sweetfacebyrocio / Instagram

Costa Rican Rocío Castillo’s IG says it all: “Products made by one woman, inspired by all women, generations ago.”

She’s literally giving us her family’s recipes for beauty and skincare and it’s all cruelty free and natural.

6. A Complete

CREDIT: @acompletewomen / Instagram

We all know that beauty starts from within: a healthy, organic, plant-heavy diet, lots of water, and maybe an extra anti-wrinkle capsule a day to keep the lines away. Angélica Fuentes founded this pro-aging skincare company with an intention to collaborate and invest in female-owned and lead organizations. Here 👏  for 👏  it. 👏

7.  Anima Mundi Apothecary

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Anima Apothecary. 16 May 2018.

Herbalist Adriana Ayales grew up in the jungles of Costa Rican with an ancestry rich in healing wisdom. She gives us an apothecary that sources directly from native people in Central and South America, creating an economy of health, equality and conscious connection to those that came before us.

Highly recommend checking out her site to find elixirs to help with memory loss, beauty sleep, and even lucid dreaming.

8. Rizos Curls

CREDIT: @rizocurls / Instagram

Caption: “icMas ReMiX is a small Afro-Latina owned business providing handcrafted organic|natural hair care products for kinky curly, coarse, coily and dreadlock hair while enforcing the message that hair texture does not determine whether it’s good or bad. In addition, empowering t-shirts are sold to celebrate natural hair, Afro-Latina pride and Boricua resiliency. Part of our mission is to also help bring awareness and contribute to hurricane relief in Puerto Rico with donations from sales proceeds.” 👏 👏 👏

9. Reina Rebelde

CREDIT: @reinarebelde / Instagram

Regina Merson told Refinery 29, “Latinas are sophisticated, discerning, and authentically rooted in their culture, and much of how beauty brands market to us doesn’t talk to us in this way. I wanted to create makeup that would honor, celebrate, and give life to our many dualities, with products full of provocative shades that deliver the boldness and passion we bring to the rituals of applying them.”

There you have it, now go get it!

10. Nevermind Cosmetics

CREDIT: @nevermindcosmetics / Instagram

These two young primas, Vanessa Enriquez and Marivette Navarrete founded Nevermind Cosmetics to give us a 90’s matte, metallic and all cruelty-free lip colors. I’m obsessed.

11. Necromancy

CREDIT: @necromancycosmetica / Instagram

Ayyy, this boricua brand will satisfy all your dark and twisty need for dark lips. Some lip color names: Naked Witch, Martyr’s Blood, Bitchwitched and Ancient Queen. Take my money.

12. MicMas ReMix

CREDIT: @micmasremix / Instagram

Caption: “Knowing your hair’s porosity is important because it allows you to know how well your hair retains moisture. With low porosity hair you may experience buildup where it may feel like products are sitting on top of your hair instead of being absorbed by the hair and scalp. This usually results in the hair feeling stiff and straw-like. Low porosity hair resists moisture and is normally protein-sensitive. Using the proper hair care regimine will help ensure your scalp and hair is fed and moisturized. MicMas ReMiX My Porosity as seen in @Essence is available with FREE shipping at www.micmasremix.com.”

13. Melt Cosmetics

CREDIT: @meltcosmetics / Instagram

Lora Arellano and Dana Bomar sold out of all their lipstick shades the very first day of launch. Their mattes are stunning, and eyeshadow shades are (clearly) everything.

14. Kleurë Cosmetics

CREDIT: @kleurecosmetics / Instagram

This brand is small, but it’s au natural and boricua. You can tell because they offer makeup bundles based on which zodiac season it is and name their body lotions after wine flavors. 🙂

15. Chaos Makeup

CREDIT: @chaosmakeup / Instagram

Megan Martínez is our 90’s childhood dream come true. Based out of Corpus Christi, Texas, she uses her chemistry-obsessed brain to give us color-changing mood cream and rainbow highlighters that only glow in the light. SWOON.

16. Brewbles

CREDIT: @brewbles / Instagram

Austin Xilangx/Mexican immigrant Catheryn Estefania Rodriguez Rangel is giving us all the Mexi bath bombs we could dream of and at affordable prices! Get yourself a bundle of elotes for just $5.50 and a giant aguacate bath bomb for $12! Bye, Lush.

17. Birch Box

CREDIT: @birchbox / Instagram

You’ve definitely heard of subscription makeup brand Birch Box, but bet you didn’t know it was owned by Latina Katia Beauchamp! It now has over 1 million global subscribers, and honestly changed the name of the game for beauty enthusiasts.

18. Bésame Cosmetics

CREDIT: @besamecosmetics / Instagram

Gabriela Hernandez started out as a photographer, graphic designer and artist. She’d go to estate sale and gun for the lipsticks, which now all serve as inspo for her brand. #CrueltyFree and available at Sephora.

19. Atomic Makeup

CREDIT: @atomicmakeup / Instagram

Oh, snap, you can do anything with this Mexican-American brand! Navil Rico claims her DIY spirit is what helped her launch the company, and she’s giving us 60 different lip shades and products on the cheap-all under $18!

20. Honest Beauty

CREDIT: @honest_beauty / Instagram

Owned by Jessica Alba, we get to have clean, healthy beauty products that go back to our roots.

Caption: “Caution: Our Magic Balm may cause everything it touches to glow.” I’m in.

21. Breakups to Makeup

CREDIT: “Mascara Bag.jpg” Digital Image. Breakups to Makeup. 16 May 2018.

Lastly, what would our makeup be without a tongue-in-cheek bag to carry it in? Angelique Velez launched her company in 2014 to prove that makeup is a form of art.

Get artsy, guys.

In A World Where Everything Is Catered To White People, Selena Quintanilla Has Long Been The Splash Of Color My Latina Soul Needed

Fierce

In A World Where Everything Is Catered To White People, Selena Quintanilla Has Long Been The Splash Of Color My Latina Soul Needed

selenaspizzas/ Instagram

Long before shops the likes of Urban Outfitters and Forever 21 began to bank on her image to sell $54 shirts to non-Latinx hipsters, Selena Quintanilla-Pérez was an icon and legend for young Latinas living across the globe. Ask a Latina and no doubt she has some sort of connection the Tejano singer whether its coordinating sons to “Baila Esta Cumbia” with her primas or playing her VHS biopic on repeat until the tape ran thin. The queen of Latinx music will always be an influential personality in Latino culture in the United States. Her music and the tragic circumstances of her death made her a pop culture phenomenon that escaped the niche Hispanic market. After her death, Hollywood studios furiously vied for the rights to adapt her incredible rags-to-riches story to the big screen. Selena is a fundamental Latino icon even 23 years after her death in 1995, at the tender age of 23.

Next time someone asks you at a party why you tear up listening to the late great Selena, be sure to serve them with these facts:

1. She brought Tejano music to mainstream America and proved women are capable of anything.

View this post on Instagram

She is amazing 😍 #selenaquintanilla#90s#fashion

A post shared by Selena Brasil 💜 (@selenaq_brasil) on

Before Selena Mexican-American music was considered an eccentricity and was definitely not played in non-Hispanic clubs and radio stations.  Speaking about the experience of being a Latinx signer, Selena once said “Tejano music was hard for us because I was a girl. My dad had a lot of problems while trying to set up shows for us or presentations because there are a lot of men who don’t think that women can get the attention of the public. But . . . wrong!” No doubt the Texas-born singer changed these harsh attitude during her life and after her untimely death.

2. She valued family

Selena might have gained worldwide notoriety in her own right, but long before she was just Selena she had a career as part of the Quintanilla family group Selena y Los Dinos, where her two older siblings also made pompas shake. Like the rest of us, familia was always important to Selena and she never forgot her origins and the role that her family had in her success. Speaking about the struggles she was grateful for enduring with her family, Selena said “We went through a hard time, and we had to turn to music as a means to putting food on the table. And we’ve been doing it ever since. No regrets either.”

3. She was proud of her heritage

Singing in Spanish when you’re not fluent can be a pretty challenging act in itself if you want to break into the mainstream, and Selena was unapologetic about her efforts to do so. “I feel very proud to be Mexican,” Selena once said in an interview about her culture. “I didn’t have the opportunity to learn Spanish when I was a girl, but . . . it’s never too late to get in touch with your roots.” Many singers and actors of Latino origin change their names for a more English-sounding or a more neutral one. But not our Selena. She didn’t look for a fancy name and good on her: Selena is such a powerful, defining name that shines on any billboard.

4. She knew that not all women are straight-sized and many have curves

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, they say, but it has long been dictated by mass media which has, in so many cases, severely distorted our perceptions of women’s bodies. Selena was proud of her curves. Eso mija, eres una fregona.  “I’m very real, very sincere, and honest, and that’s how I’ll always be,” the star once said in an interview. 

5. She had a unique style

Amidst the customary images and selling points of whitewashed media and the current political turmoils of today, it can be hard for a Latina to feel confident in her identity. Selena did so with aplomb. Her wardrobe choices were interesting and daring in equal measure, which is probably one of the reasons behind her success as a pop culture brand.  She was criticized by more conservative audiences for “revealing too much”. We say al carajo con sus juicios.  Still, the Tejano singer stayed strong her opinions about her self, saying once, “Always believe that the impossible is always possible.”

6. Because she showed that Latinas can be captains of their fate as well as the fiercest activists.

“What I don’t like are arrogant people. We’re all equal. I don’t like it when a person assumes to be better,” Quintanilla once stated in an interview.  Her posthumous campaign with cosmetics giant MAC demonstrated that Latino women in particular and women of color, in general, could and should carry campaigns. She was beautiful and the world needed to see that.

7. She was active in her community “All I need to do is try and do the best that I can do”

As a minority, solidarity is key for the Latino community in the United States, particularly today. Selena embodied community values and never forgot her fellow Mexican-Americans. Certainly an example we should all follow. She grew up in Texas, where migratory patterns and backwards thinking about race make various segments of the Hispanic population feel vulnerable. Power to the people!

8. She urged children to stay en la escuela (don’t drop out, escuincles!)

“Music is not a very stable business. You know it comes and it goes, and so does money. But your education stays with you for the rest of your life.” Selena knew how important education is for minorities in the United States, and that hard work and academic development are the only way for the community to strive. She constantly visited schools and urged young chamacos not to drop out. Respect.

9. Because she was an independent self-made woman “If you have a dream, don’t let anybody take it away”

She was young but life taught her that all you have is yourself. We can’t believe she was just 23 when she died. Truly wise beyond her years.

Read: Mariah Carey Got Real About Being Biracial And Her Words Will Undoubtedly Have Afro-Latinas Feeling So Seen

Recommend this story by clicking the share button below! 

Puerto Rican Model With Down Syndrome Stuns At New York Fashion Week

Fierce

Puerto Rican Model With Down Syndrome Stuns At New York Fashion Week

sofiajirau / Instagram

The world of fashion is notoriously a parade of homogeneity. While certain brands make valiant attempts to diversify the faces and designs that represent their lines, it’s true that there is a world of progress to be made. Which leads us to our praise and worship for Sofía Jirau.

Sofia Jirau is a 22-year-old Puerto Rican model with Down Syndrome.

She is, to say the least, a true jefa whose recent appearance on the runway at a New York Fashion Week show is undoubtedly a game-changer. While walking the runway this past week, the model lived out her dream of not only modeling in New York but also shaking up its fashion scene.

“When I was little, I looked myself in the mirror and said, ‘I’m going to be a model and a businesswoman,’” Jirau told People in a recent interview.

And just look at her now.

Jirau got her start back in 2019 when she signed with INprende, an agency that works to represent models and faces like Sofia. Since making her deal, Jirau has gone on to model for designers like Kelvin Giovannie and Marisa Santiago. 
“I was born for this and I want to show the world that I have everything a model needs to shine,” Jirau wrote in a post about her NYFW debut on Instagram.

Here’s to hoping for more of this!