Entertainment

Here’s How Natti Natasha Came From A Humble Town In Dominican Republic To Being The Woman With Most Views On YouTube

We love us some SLW! (it stands for Strong Latina Woman, of course), and Natti Natasha is certainly one of them. Her morenaza looks and her unashamedly fierce attitude have helped her climb the ranks of the musical industry, while becoming a voice for fellow women and for Brown identity, both in the United States and in Latin American markets such as Peru, Colombia, and Chile, where she is incredibly famous.

These are some facts you need to know about this gorgeous lady that has arrived para quedarse.

Su nombre completo is…

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Her birth certificate reads Natalia Alexandra Gutiérrez Batist, but it is OK if you simply call her Natti, short for Natalia in most Latin American countries.

Her birthday is very close to Navidad

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

She was born on December 10, 1986. We wonder if tiny chiquita Natalia got double presents at the end of the year! And yes, this powerhouse is as young as she is talented.

She is a proud native of Santiago de los Caballeros, in the Dominican Republic

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

This Caribbean queen began her mi involvement in music at a very early age. When she was just seven-years-old she registered in the School of Fine Arts of her hometown, training as a singer.

Her musical heroes are…  (hint, she has impeccable gusto musical)

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

As a child of the sea, of course, she was influenced by Bob Marley, but also by Jerry Rivera and the amazing Lauryn Hill, a member of The Fugees and one of the most powerful female Black voices of recent years.

She moved to New York when she was just 18

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

This brave lady moved to the United States when she was just dieciocho, trying to start a career in pop music. That is where she had a meeting that would change her life.

She met Don Omar and her life as a struggling singer living in the Bronx took a giant leap

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Don Omar, who is the godfather of Latino reggaeton in the United States, singed Natti Natasha to his record label, Orfanato Music Group. Her dream was starting to take shape.

En menos de lo que canta un gallo she was collaborating with Don Omar and Farruko

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Just like any reggaeton artist, Natti Natasha’s beginnings were marked by collaborations with more established artists. She released “Dutty Love” with Don Omar and “Crazy in Love” with Farruko. These songs were part of a compilation album released by Don Omar.

2017: the year of Daddy Yankee

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Another rite of passage in the industry is to collaborate with the legendary Daddy Yankee, and Natti Natasha did do in 2017, with the song “Otra Cosa”.

In 2017 she also broke into the Billboard charts, esa es mija!

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

After her song with Daddy Yankee she collaborated with Ozuna, and the song, “Criminal”, was a hit, one of those songs that seem to be blessed by the gods of music. She reached the top five in the Billboard Hot Latin Songs.

Fuera la pijama… with Becky G

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

If you are reading this, we are almost sure that you have listed to “Sin Pijama”, Natasha’s collaboration with the other reina del raeggeton, Becky G. The video has reached one billion views. Damn!

Her debut album was released in 2019

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Yes, the muy pegajoso and amazing album Illuminati was released on February 15 this year. It was launched by Pina Records and Sony Music Latin. Not bad for a Dominican princess who once had a dream!

Her YouTube numbers are higher than Taylor Swift’s and Ariana Grande’s

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Just to get an idea of how big of a deal she is: in 2018 alone her videos were watched over 4 billion times. Just let that sink in for a moment. Son un chingo de veces. 

She is a natural beauty

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Yes, she might be all maquillada and super-produced onstage, but she is a natural and honest belleza. Just look at this picture of her sans makeup: that skin speaks of self-care and self-love.

She has a raw, empowering sensuality 

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Natti Natasha is not afraid to show off her physical attributes and is very, very flirty and amazing on social media (see picture above!). She is what modern femininity is all about.

The industry has fallen at her feet

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Natasha has won so many accolades that we can only imagine what her mantelpiece will look like when she is an old lady looking back at her life. She was a big winner in the 2019 Premio Lo Nuestro awards, where she took home four awards. She has also won the Hot Latin Songs Artist of the Year, Female, award at the 2019 Billboard Latin Music Awards.

She has visited Venezuela recently, where she experienced first-hand the awesomeness of its people

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

She recorded the video for “No voy a llorar” in the embattled country. She shared heart-warming photos and a positive message on her Insta. We can’t help but love her.

She is brave and is unafraid of challenges

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

In the Women in the Lead Panel at Latin Music week, she said: “It was more about not being afraid of doing certain things. Not being afraid of collaborating with other females, not being afraid of singing as a solo artist. That’s the key to becoming successful in this industry: to dare and to not be afraid.” Thanks for your courage, queen!

She has succeeded in a world dominated by men

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

And this doubles her merit. She told Rolling Stone about her experience writing her debut album: “I saw myself struggling with being independent. And being afraid to try different things, of going into different genres, of going into a studio and being [the only] girl.” We are thankful for women like herself and Becky G, who have broken the proverbial glass ceiling for future generations of Latina talent.

Rob Kardashian is head over heels for her, but he has been a bit creepy in doing so. No, Rob, just no. 

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Yes, Rob Kardashian was being a bit viejo cochino on Twitter... seriously, dude. There are DM’s and if Natti Natasha wants to reply, then that is her prerogative.

The international sponsorships have started… be ready to live in Natti Natasha’s world!

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

Natti Natasha has struck a deal with internationally famous liqueur Malibu (a coconut lover’s dream). This is a big breakthrough for any Spanish-speaking artist. Her charm and above all her talent will surely lead to more tratos jugosos.

She has collaborated with la crema y nata of Latin music, and she will continue to do so

Credit: Instagram. @nattinatasha

The ever-expanding list of talent she has collaborated with include Bad Bunny, R.K.M & Ken-Y, Becky G, Thalía and Cosculluela. The sky is the limit for this reina dominicana and we are sure we will see much more of her in the years to come.

Every Time I Go Back To The Dominican Republic, I Remember The Person I Am And Want To Be

Culture

Every Time I Go Back To The Dominican Republic, I Remember The Person I Am And Want To Be

aruni_y_photography / Instagram

Anyone traveling to the Dominican Republic this summer has likely been met with the cautionary warning; “Don’t drink anything from the minibar.” Eleven tourist deaths on the island in 2019, ranging from natural causes to counterfeit alcohol consumption, have spurred FBI and State Department investigations. Though news of flight and hotel cancellations abounded, I missed my family and refused to let fear stop me from seeing them. Since I lived to tell the tale, here are a few things I learned about my father, about myself, and about the precarious paradise that keeps calling me back.

Billy Joel and Nas have interpreted the “New York state of mind,” and if you have ever visited the Dominican Republic beyond the purpose of tourism, you’ll know that there exists a Dominican state of mind too.

Credit: Dan Gold / Unsplash

Whenever I exit Las Americas or Puerto Plata airports, humidity slaps me in the face, and my Dominican mindset is immediately activated. On this island, electricity does not run 24/7. When the electricity goes, or as we say “se fue la luz,” water doesn’t run from the tap either. All that is left to do is swap your sneakers for flip-flops, and exorcise your need for immediate gratification. It takes practice, and I re-learn this lesson with each visit.

The Dominican Republic is changing fast. 

Credit: zonacolonialrd / Instagram

There is new construction everywhere you look. I sit on the balcony chatting with my father and stare across the street trying to remember how it looked before the apartment building was constructed in that space. I can see from an open doorway on the ground level that wooden boxes are being stacked, and hauled out in front of a business. I tune out my father’s voice as I focus on the shape and size of the boxes. My Spanish needs work, and I ask my father, “Papi, what does ataúd mean?” The business slogan translates to “Quality Coffins.” I think about magic realism traditions in Latin American literature, and I am reminded that so often a country like this juxtaposes disparate images and experiences in such a casual manner. I don’t think I would be able to live across the street from a constant reminder of death anywhere else but on this incongruous island.

We drive to the countryside of El Seibo for a few days.

Credit: fedoacurd/ Instagram

My father syncs his playlist and he directs my sister what song to play next. The first song is by Boy George. I watch my father sing along, and I can’t help but think about the Dominican Republic’s homophobic culture steeped in hyper-masculinity. Same-sex marriage is not recognized on the island, and members of the LGBTQ community continue to face discrimination and violence. I talk to my sister about this later that night, and she tells me small changes are coming to the island. The city of Santo Domingo hosts inclusive events like Draguéalo, where you can even sign up for a Vogue class.

Credit: Draguelao / Facebook

My father’s playlist continues and I’m struck by his selections ranging from Taylor Swift to A.I.E. (A Mwana), a song by a 1970s group called Black Blood, featuring lyrics in Swahili.

I watched this Dominican dad jam across continents, decades, cultures, languages, and race. I realize there is so much I don’t know about him, and so often we shortchange our parents’ knowledge and experience, reducing them to stereotypes and gendered tropes.

My next lesson is on staying sexy.

                                                           Unsplash/Photo by Ardian Lumi 

After a few days in the countryside, my sister and I rent a hotel room in La Zona Colonial. We ready for a night out when she looks at my outfit and asks me, “Um, is that what you’re wearing tonight?” I thought my yellow jumpsuit was poppin’. My sister pulls out a little black dress from her overnight bag and kindly suggests I wear it. The dress is tiny. It’s skimpy. It’s super short. It’s absolutely perfect. I channel my inner Chapiadora, Goddess of Sex Appeal and Free Drinks, and dance all night. 

Growing up in the 90s, I styled myself in oversized men’s clothing. It wasn’t until that one magical summer in the Dominican Republic when the heat was too oppressive to wear jeans, so I wore—gasp—a skirt. That was the first time I felt sexy, and learned the power of sex appeal. Though I wielded that power throughout my twenties, it fell away in my thirties. Wearing my sister’s LBD I realize I still have “it,” and in the Dominican Republic, sex appeal is ageless. Be careful when you come here. You may fall in love with a local, or you may just fall in love with yourself again.

The island leaves me with one last lesson.

It comes late one night, sharing a few bottles of wine with my father and sister. No hay peor ciego que el que no quiere ver—the worst blind person is the one who refuses to see. I could say the current political landscape in the U.S. reflects this willful ignorance, a refusal to see; yet it is the same human experience felt across space and time.

I come away wondering about my own blind spots.

                                                            Instagram/@rensamayoa

I board my return flight thinking up ways to combat willful ignorance at home, thinking about maintaining that flexible DR state of mind and thinking about buying a little black dress. As tourism in the Dominican Republic picks up again, and unfavorable headlines drop out of the news cycle, this changing island stands in its own plurality welcoming visitors, and offering endless opportunities to teach us something new.

READ:

This Veracruz Taquería Made Marvel’s Thanos Twerk In Its Hilarious Ad

Entertainment

This Veracruz Taquería Made Marvel’s Thanos Twerk In Its Hilarious Ad

Takesabroso / Facebook

If you’ve ever visited Mexico, you know that copyright laws seem pretty lax. There are all kinds of Pokémon, Disney, and Cartoon Network inspired goods from piñatas to costumes in most mercados. The same can be said for tv ads. Takesabroso, a taquería in Veracruz, México, has jumped on the trend and created a stellar ad for their food using Thanos and his unknown twerking skills. Jorge Lajud produced a commercial for the taquería that artfully mashes up a scene of villain Thor from “Avengers: Endgame” and a montage of tacos and other Mexican food. Like any other art form, you have to see it to appreciate it.

The video has gone viral with over 5.5 million views thanks to it being posted on Twitter.

Credit: @goingonajournie / Twitter

The commercial starts with a scene we’re all familiar with–the moment Thanos thinks he has all the Infinity Stones and offers a build-up to the moment he wipes out all of mankind. Spoiler: he doesn’t. Thanos says, “Yo soy inevitable,” snaps his fingers, and nothing happens.

Then, instead of the scene cutting to superhero Iron Man, we see Takesabroso owner, Luis Vazquez, dramatically saying, “Yo soy Takesabroso.”

Credit: Takesabroso / Facebook

He snaps his fingers and saves the day with a montage of Takesabroso’s menu items. In the bottom left-hand corner, supervillain Thanos seems to be happy with how terribly his plan failed and is twerking up against the lechón on screen. 

Yup. Thanos is twerking to cumbia.

Fans are here for it. As video rolls on burritos, tacos, and rotating meat, Thanos just keeps on dancing cumbia in the corner. “It’s the twerking thanos that really tied it all together,” commented one fan.

It’s official. Thanos is now Thaños and is clearly invited to every carne asada.

Credit: @troyareyes / Twitter

That little tilde on the “n” goes a very long way in making Thanos a true dancing Latino icon.

Some folks are worried that Takesabroso isn’t going to get away with using Marvel footage.

Credit: @Westside_LEE / Twitter

Personally, we think Thaños is far more appealing than his evil twin, Thanos. Mexicans have basically responded to this tweet with pure laughter. “Marvel lawyers trying to stop a Mexican restaurant from stealing intellectual property? Good luck,” tweets one fan.

This has prompted a whole other thread about different ways folks have seen Mexican restaurants “give precisely zero f***s.”

Credit: @urfriendktt / Twitter

One person seemingly well versed in copyright infringement tweeted their two cents, “Well it’s not illegal the clip used is not long enough to be considered plagiarism and its transformative enough to be fair use but Disney has sued for less and won lol.” 

Disney’s “Avengers: Endgame” was the final installment of the “Avengers” franchise and is the highest-grossing film of all time. The timing of the video is smart given that Disney released “Avengers: Endgame” on Blu-ray and DVD this week.

The rest of Latin America has also chimed in to share ways their countries don’t care about copyright.

Credit: @racampos / Twitter

“My fave: Harry Potter y el Orden del Taco,” read one reply. Nope, we’re voting for “Harry Potter y el trompo de pastor” for the win. 

“In Mexico City, we have a place named “Tacos Goku” or also there’s “Tacos Megaman” the copyright is like a joke for them,” one Mexicano tweeted. Another said he ” remembered a tortilleria called “El Thor-tillero” on León, near the bus station (central camionera).”

This isn’t the first time Takesabroso has ventured into hilarious advertisements…

Credit: @jorgelajudm / Twitter 

Takesabroso’s video editor in resident, Jorge Lajud, recast the restaurant owner in a scene from Venom and then had his form be overlayed by a Ricardo Milos dancing. Note the floating images of tacos and burgers floating around him. It’s pretty clear Vazquez is also absolutely delighted by these commercials.

Takesabroso has welcomed the wide response from folks and even dedicated a Facebook post to its fans. “Takesabroso not only seeks to bring flavor to your life, but it also seeks to bring joy to your heart,” Vazquez posted. “This meme is viral, thanks to all.”

The woman responsible for gifting the video to Twitter, which took it viral, is using her platform to promote non-profit RAICES Texas.

Credit: @goingonajournie / Twitter

The Refugee Aid Project, commonly known as RAICES, is the largest immigration legal services provider in Texas. It’s staffed with 130 attorneys, legal assistants and support staff whose sole job is to offer legal representation to immigrants at risk from America’s current immigration policies. In 2017, they closed 51,000 cases at no cost to the client.

You can donate to RAICES here.

Watch the full video below!

YO SOY TAKESABROSO

YO SOY TAKESABROSO

Posted by Takesabroso on Friday, August 2, 2019

READ: 20 Hilarious Taqueria Names That’ll Fill Your Tummy With Laughs!

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