Entertainment

Here Are Some ‘Coco’ Quotes You Can Use In Any Situation Because ‘Coco’ Is Universal

If you’re like the millions of others who watched the Pixar movie “Coco,” you probably cried your eyes out. But also learned some amazing life lessons along with Miguel, Hector and the rest of the family. Even Dante the dog! Through his adventures in the Land of the Dead, Miguel taught us all about the importance of love, family, remembering your loved ones, and following your heart.

Here are 20 quotes from “Coco” to keep you inspired!

1. This line from “Remember Me.”

coco
CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures / Pixar Animation Studios

“For even if I’m far away, I hold you in my heart / I sing a secret song to you, each night we are apart.” Oof! That still gives me chills!

2. When Coco looked on the bright side of his family history.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“A minute ago I thought I was related to a murderer! You’re a total upgrade!” I mean, if you discover that you’re not actually related to a cold blooded killer that ended up ruining an important part of your family’s life, then yeah you’d be happy too.

3. Why it’s important to remember the dead.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“He’s been forgotten. When there’s no one left in the living world who remembers you, you disappear from this world. We call it the Final Death.” That part was not just upsetting but made me think of all my great grandparents and great aunts and people who I never knew and are forgotten.

4. On keeping family members alive, even after they’re gone.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Our memories, they have to be passed down by those who knew us in life – in the stories they tell about us.” This made me tear up so bad, thinking about how we need to talk about the family members that passed away so coming generations know where they came from. I plan on telling family stories until I no longer can.

5. Take this one with a grain of salt.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Seize your moment.” Ernesto de la Cruz spoke these words that inspired Miguel and countless of his fans to go after their dreams. Plot twist: he also used it to commit murder. Don’t do that! But yeah, seize your moment when you’re trying to make a name for yourself.

6. That reminder of what it means to be a part of a family.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Being a part of this family means you are here for THIS family.” It may not make sense at first hearing, or reading, but it makes complete sense once it hits. Being there for someone means really being there, physically, emotionally, and spiritually.

7. What family is meant for.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“That is what families are supposed to do, support you.” Uhh there is not a single lie to be found in this line. We need family, whatever form that comes in, to look out for us.

8. The difference between forgiving and forgetting.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“You don’t’ have to forgive him, but we shouldn’t forget him.” Keeping the memory of our loved ones alive, even when they did wrong, is important. And this line from the movie is a beautiful reminder of that. Even if the ones that hurt us don’t deserve to be remembered or forgiven, in keeping the memory we can even grow from it.

9. On success.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Success doesn’t come for free. You have to do whatever it takes to seize your moment.” While the second part of this has already been mentioned, this full version also deserves a shout out. Success take work, and it’s not handed to most people. But still, don’t murder anyone.

10. A simple reminder.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Nothing’s more important than family.” Family really is everything. Whether it’s the one you’re born into, or the one you build, you need the support system of people loving you and looking out for you.

11. Believing in your path.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“One cannot deny who one is meant to be.” Believing in yourself and your purpose in life is hard sometimes, but when you know for sure who you are and what you’re meant to be doing, it’s a powerful feeling. Keep pushing forward.

12. Follow your heart and the things that make you happy.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“I have to sing, I have to play. The music, it’s not just in me, it is me. When life gets me down, I play my guitar.” Whatever it is that brings you joy, do it and let it live within you. It’s those joys that make life worth living.

13. On taking a chance no matter the risk.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“The rest of the world may follow the rules, but I must follow my heart.” Sometimes the thing that will make us most happy, that will make our dreams come true, are too far to touch because of the rules life sets upon you. But if you are willing to break the rules to get there, you have a better shot.

14. Working hard for your dreams.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“No one was going to hand me my future. It was up to me to reach for my dream, grab it tight and make it come true.” Inspiring words that teach you to do the work necessary to make your dreams come true.

15. On music.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Never underestimate the power of music.” Music is a universal language, and has the power to transform our mood, our livelihood, our moments. Music is such a huge part of Latinx culture because of its power.

16. Knowing what should be given a name.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Never name a street dog. They’ll follow you forever.” Now in the movie this was in direct reference to Miguel’s street dog Dante. However, the same should be applied to crappy dudes you sleep with once. No need to remember their names.

17. Family love is always needed.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Never forget how much your family loves you.” Even though we usually know our families are there for us, and love us unconditionally, it’s still important to hear. Call your family and let them know today.

18. Not being blinded by our dreams.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Be careful what you chase after.” While it’s important to follow your dreams and work hard to achieve them, you have to be careful of what you sacrifice in doing so. In the movie, it meant giving up family.

19. Again, family is everything no matter what.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“We may have our differences, but nothing’s more important than family.” Family doesn’t always agree, and sometimes family fights. But at the end of the day, family is a bond that strengthens your love.

20. Being yourself.

CREDIT: “Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“I’m not like the rest of my family.” Sometimes you’re the “different” one in your family. That can be tough growing up, but with a family that loves and supports you it makes you a tougher person.

Through the laughs, the tears, and the heart warming moments, “Coco” taught us all about love, family, and following your dreams. These quotes all hit home for a variety of reasons, and made us think long and hard about the people we remember and the sacrifices we make. But seriously, pass the Kleenex!

Latinas Are Getting Nostalgic on Twitter After Seeing that Disney+ is Streaming ‘Gotta Kick it Up’

Entertainment

Latinas Are Getting Nostalgic on Twitter After Seeing that Disney+ is Streaming ‘Gotta Kick it Up’

It is possible that Disney has, yet again, out-done itself. On Tuesday, Disney finally launched its much-anticipated streaming service Disney+, the subscription-based platform that is set to release over 600 titles to their customers for $6.99 a month. The buzz around this service has long been building, with people expressing their excitement at the release of their long-forgotten childhood favorites since Disney+’s Twitter account tweeted out all of the titles that would become available on its launch.

For nostalgic millennials who grew up watching Disney Channel Original Movies, the premiere of this service has been nothing short of life-changing. People are taking to their social media feeds to express their excitement over forgotten favorites like “Smart House”, “Zenon: Girl of the 21st Century”, and “Don’t Look Under the Bed”. But the movie that Latinas are most excited about re-watching? “Gotta Kick It Up”. 

For those of you who need a refresher, “Gotta Kick it Up” was a 2002 Disney Channel original movie that starred America Ferrera.

The movie follows a group of middle school girls who are trying to form a dance team in Los Angeles in the face of budget cuts. Scrambling for a coach, the girls turn to their biology teacher, Ms. Bartlett, to whip them into shape. Like any underdog tale, the aspiring dance team starts off as a mess, but with a lot of hard work, the girls soon start to believe in themselves. Through the course of the movie, the girls learn how to put their differences aside and work together to eventually qualify for nationals. 

The Disney Channel movie was notable for not only having a primarily Latinx cast (which is a rarity even today), but for featuring baby-faced versions of successful Latina actresses like America Ferrera and Camille Guaty. Not only that, but the movie’s climax featured a rad dance scene that little girls everywhere tried to imitate in their living rooms (seriously–look it up).

“Gotta Kick It Up” was groundbreaking for its depiction of Latinx life that wasn’t centered on harmful stereotypes or cliche stories.

The movie was written by Meghan Cole, and was based on her experience as a Teach for America teacher at Nimitz Middle School in Huntington Park, Los Angeles. The decision to make these Latina students normal teens was a deliberate choice, according to Cole. “I wanted to have a Latino movie, with Latino kids doing great things,” she told The New York Times. “Not being stereotypical kids creating havoc”. Cole also expressed her desire for the movie to “portray positive teenage Latino role models and stress the importance of after-school programs”. 

But arguably “Gotta Kick It Up”‘s greatest legacy was teaching a legion of youngsters the phrase “Sí, se puede!” as well as the history behind it. At one point during the movie, the girls are doubting themselves and their chances of winning the upcoming dance competition. In response, Daisy, the movie’s protagonist, tells the girls a brief history of her grandmother’s involvement in the Chicano movement and tells them about how Cesar Chavez’s rallying cry “Sí, se puede!” served to strengthen and unify the Mexican-American community. Throughout the movie, the girls repeat the phrase whenever they’re happy, doubtful, or scared. 

Of course, Latinas on Twitter are not hesitating to shout from the rooftops the the return of “Gotta Kick It Up” to our TV screens.

It’s always exciting to be reminded of something that was so integral to your childhood that you may have forgotten about. The fact that Latinas can watch this movie again, as well as share it with a younger generation, is worth celebrating.

This Latina gave the entire Twitterverse a very informative PSA about Disney+’s movie catalog: 

https://twitter.com/_hadaaa/status/1194345273138597888?s=20

Not all heroes wear capes.

This person had very specific requirements for the conditions under which they’d pull out their wallet for yet ANOTHER streaming service:

Honestly, the service could cost $50 a month and we would shell out the money for a chance to be able to watch this cinematic masterpiece on repeat.

This person knows that his money is being spent on only the most important things in life:

Sometimes, you’ve got to be honest with yourself and decide what your priorities are in life. And sometimes, those priorities are binge-watching Disney Channel Original Movies all day.

This Latina became emotional about the impact that “Gotta Kick It Up” had on her when she was younger:

Yet somehow, it’s frustrating to know that not that much project has been made for Latinx representation in the media almost 15 years later.

Here’s The Woman Behind The Stunning Marigold Bridges In ‘Coco’ And Her Ofrenda Art

Culture

Here’s The Woman Behind The Stunning Marigold Bridges In ‘Coco’ And Her Ofrenda Art

Javier Rojas / mitú

This weekend is sure to be a special time at the Hollywood Bowl as Disney and Pixar’s Coco will be screening a live-to-film concert experience like no other. Stars like Miguel, Eva Longoria, and Benjamin Bratt made appearances at both screenings and the iconic film was accompanied by a full, live orchestra.

However, there was one other star making her presence felt this weekend. While she might not be taking the stage or even be known to some, she is a legend in the world of Día De Los Muertos. Meet Ofelia Esparza, who for the last 40 years she has been behind hundreds of ofrendas, or alters, honoring loved ones who have past.

Her work has been featured in some of most famous museums including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Japanese American National Museum, the National Museum of Mexican Art, internationally at the first Day of the Dead exhibit in Glasgow, Scotland. Just last week, Esparza and her daughter, Rosanna Esparza Ahrens, had an exhibit at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C.

This weekend, Esparza and Ahrens showcased a three-level ofrenda right outside of the Hollywood Bowl venue. The ofrenda greeted guests attending the showings of “Coco.”

Credit: Javier Rojas

Esparza, 86, who was born and still lives in East L.A, has devoted most of her life to creating alters. She learned many of her craft skills from her mother in Mexico and in return has passed on these traditions to her nine children. For Esparza, alter making is more than just a form of expression but an obligation that has made its way through multiple generations to honor loved ones who are now gone.

While Esparza has never met her great-great-grandmother, she knows of her through years of alter-making. Without this craft being passed down through multiple generations, she says she might have never known much about her and credits this tradition for intimately connecting her.

“My mother passed this on to me at a very young age and it always stuck with me that I have to carry on these traditions because if we don’t then who will,” Esparza said.

Using an array of photos, candles and vibrant carnations, Esparza’s alters stand out for their use of giant multilevel structures. The alters range from personal, political and even spiritual. Her work has garnered her many awards including just last year when she was recognized by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) as a 2018 National Heritage Fellow.

“I’m touched that people look at my work and want to learn more about this. It goes beyond just Día De Los Muertos but celebrating and honoring those who have past,” Esparza said. “To me that’s the biggest honor, being able to teach people about what alter making is really about.”

Esparza has followed through with many of the traditions her mother taught her at a young age and continues to pass this on. In her 40s, she became a school teacher where she included Mexican culture into her curriculum, including Dia de Los Muertos celebrations. This has included speaking at schools, museums, community centers, prisons, and parks throughout LA county and across the country.

Her expertise and passion for alters led Esparza to be a cultural consultant for “Coco.” Many of the scenes, including the famous flower bridge, were ideas that came from her.

Credit: Javier Rojas

Esparza was approached by Disney and Pixar to be a cultural consultant for the Oscar-winning film. She says that many details and scenes seen throughout the movie came from some of her feedback including the famous marigold bridge scene where ancestors cross over into the land of the living on the Day of the Dead.

“I gave them a lot of feedback on certain things including what the bridge that connects the two worlds of the living and the dead represents,” Esparza said. “It was incredible to see that come to life and for people to resonate with that message of crossing over into two worlds.”

When asked about the popularity of the film and what it means for new generations to learn about Día de Los Muertos, she says it makes her happy and only asks of one thing.

“I want people to know that Día de Los Muertos is more than just putting on some skull paint but a true honoring of those who are no longer with us.”

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