Culture

The Move To Ban Physical Punishment For Kids In Mexico Is Proving To Be Controversial And Here’s Why

The topic of whether spanking your kids is right or wrong is a topic that has come to the forefront in recent years. Abusing a child is never correct, but what about an old-fashioned spank on the butt? I say old fashion because spanking children seemed to be customary back in the day. For many Latinos, getting a chanclado isn’t deemed an enormous deal; in fact, on social media, people look back at these moments as funny. But times are really changing, maybe that’s a good thing?

In Mexico, the Senate approved a new law that prohibits parents from hitting their kids

The new addition to the General Law on the Rights of Girls, Children, and Adolescents and states that guardians must not spank, scratch, yank ears, or pinch children. If parents are caught doing so, they could face harsh repercussions. They call this form of discipline corporal punishment. 

The law was backed by the United Nations Children’s Fund, who stated in 2017 that “300 million, or three-quarters, of the world’s two- to four-year-old children experience either psychological aggression or physical punishment, or both, by their caregivers at home.”

“The harm inflicted on children around the world does tremendous damage,” UNICEF Chief of Child Protection Cornelius Williams in a press release on the report, titled A Familiar Face: Violence in the lives of children and adolescents. He added, “Babies slapped in the face; girls and boys forced into sexual acts; adolescents murdered in their communities – violence against children knows no boundaries.”

Mexico rolled out its anti-child abuse initiative with a campaign that shows the patterns of abuse and what it looks like. 

The animated images show a child that is being threatened with a belt; another picture shows that abuse is often an action that adults inflict on each other. 

People on social media expressed their disapproval of this new law. Some of them said it sounded silly, and others said that giving kids structural discipline is needed much more today. 

One woman on Twitter wrote, “What a stupid thing!! I am very grateful to my parents for correcting me as it should be and I am not with any kind of trauma. With this, all they are doing is spoiling future generations and with them the future of our country.”

Another said., “Correct the child today, so you don’t have to punish the man tomorrow …. my house my rules … it’s that simple.”

“By not correcting the child in time, you make him rebellious, not in all cases or with all children. But there are some who do not understand until you reflect authority as a father. Just see what education was like before we all lived in peace, and now that there is so much violence,” another chimed in. 

There is no denying that children are getting abused. 

The U.N. provided staggering statistics that show just how much children around the world are getting abused either by a guardian or sometimes caretakers at school or daycare. 

They state: “Worldwide, 176 million, or one in four, children under age five are living with a mother who is a victim of intimate partner violence.

The report also finds that around 15 million adolescent girls aged 15 to 19 worldwide have experienced forced sexual intercourse or other forced sexual acts in their lifetime. Only one percent of teenage girls who had experienced sexual violence said they reached out for professional help.”

Yet, still, people on social media stated that Mexico’s stance against chanclazaos and/or getting pinched is a bit much. They also don’t appreciate being told how to raise their children. 

“Now it turns out that politicians will tell us how we should educate our children,” a person said on Twitter. “If I had my doubts about this government, today it is clear to me, one thing is discipline, and another is violence or denigration, depending on how the child is educated is the values of the man of the future, as one person said before, a punishment now avoids more significant damage later. 

What is your opinion? Should it be okay for parents to spank their children? 

READ: An Ode To La Chancla

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Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

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Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

Hector Vivas / Getty Images

Love him or hate him, Mexico’s President Andres Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) has long called himself the voice of the people – and many Mexicans agree with him. That’s why his latest announcement against social media companies has many so worried.

In the wake of Twitter and Facebook’s (along with many other social media platforms) announcement that they would be restricting or banning Donald Trump from their platforms, the Mexican president expressed his contempt for the decisions. And his intention to create a Mexican social network that won’t be held to the standards from Silicon Valley.

Mexico’s AMLO moves to create a social media network for Mexicans outside of Silicon Valley’s control.

A week after his United States counterpart was kicked off Facebook and Twitter, President López Obrador floated the idea of creating a national social media network to avoid the possibility of Mexicans being censored.

Speaking at his daily news conference, AMLO instructed the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt) and other government departments to look at the possibility of creating a state-owned social media site that would guarantee freedom of speech in Mexico.

“We care about freedom a lot, it’s an issue that’s going to be addressed by us,” he told reporters. He also added that Facebook and Twitter have become “global institutions of censorship,” sounding a lot like the alt-right terrorists that stormed the U.S. Capitol.

“To guarantee freedom, for freedom, so there’s no censorship in Mexico. We want a country without censorship. Mexico must be a country of freedom. This is a commitment we have,” he told reporters.

AMLO deeply criticized the moves by Twitter and Facebook to ban Trump from their platforms.

Credit: Hector Vivas / Getty Images

AMLO – like Trump – is an avid user of social media to connect with his constituents. He’s also been known to spread falsehoods and boast about his achievements on the platforms – sound familiar?

So, it came as little surprise when he tore into social media companies for ‘censoring’ Donald Trump, saying that they have turned into “global institutions of censorship” and are carrying out a “holy inquisition.”

Nobody has the right to silence citizens even if their views are unpopular, López Obrador said. Even if the words used by Trump provoked a violent attack against his own government.

“Since they took these decisions [to suspend Trump], the Statue of Liberty has been turning green with anger because it doesn’t want to become an empty symbol,” he quipped.

So what could a Mexican social media network be called?

The president’s proposal to create a national social media network triggered chatter about what such a site would or should be called. One Twitter user suggested Facemex or Twitmex, apparently taking his inspiration from the state oil company Pemex.

The newspaper Milenio came up with three alternative names and logos for uniquely Mexican sites, suggesting that a Mexican version of Facebook could be called Facebookóatl (inspired by the Aztec feathered-serpent god Quetzalcóatl), Twitter could become Twitterlopochtli (a riff on the name of Aztec war, sun and human deity Huitzilopochtli) and Instagram could become Instagratlán (tlán, which in the Náhuatl language means place near an abundance of something – deer, for example, in the case of Mazatlán – is a common suffix in Mexican place names.)

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Police Say The Abused Boy Who Was Rescued By An Orlando Waitress Endured ‘Torture’

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Police Say The Abused Boy Who Was Rescued By An Orlando Waitress Endured ‘Torture’

Netflix

The tragic story of Gabriel Fernandez, an eight-year-old boy who was abused and tortured by his own family members made headlines last year when his story was created into a Netflix documentary. The six-part crime documentary detailed how Fernandez’s murder came about due to local government failure and was a reminder that we all have a responsibility to keep our eyes out for victims.

Now, an Orlando waitress is being hailed for doing just that.

Flavaine Carvalho saved a child abuse victim after spotting bruises on the boy’s face and arms.

Carvalho (who works as a waitress at Mrs. Potato restaurant in Orlando, Florida) was on the clock on New Year’s Day serving a family that had walked into the restaurant when she noticed their 11-year-old boy. Realizing that the boy had nothing to eat, Carvalho asked if there was something wrong with the food. The boy’s stepfather explained that the boy would eat dinner at home later. It was then that Carvalho noticed bruises on the boy’s face and arms.

“I could see he had a big scratch between his eyebrows,” Carvalho explained in a press conference to FOX 35. “Couple of minutes later, I saw a bruise on the side of his eye. So I felt there was something really wrong.”

It was then that Carvalho said she knew that she had to do something. “I could not see the boy going away without any help,” she explained.

Coming up with a plan, Carvalho wrote a large note to the boy that read “Do you need help?”

The waitress stood behind the boy’s parents so that they couldn’t see and held up the sign for the boy. When he nodded, Carvalho immediately called the police.

According to the 911 call, Carvalho told the dispatcher “I’m super concerned and I don’t know what to do, can you give me some advice?” Carvalho said to the dispatcher. “The boy is with bruises and he’s not eating.”

After authorities arrived, they interviewed the boy, who accused his stepfather of abuse, saying that he been tied up, hung from a door, hit with a broom, and handcuffed. The boy also said that his parents kept food from him as punishment.

Police claimed that the doctors who examined the boy said that they found bruises on his face and arms and said that he was approximately 20 pounds underweight.

Police confirmed that the boy’s stepfather has been charged with three counts of aggravated child abuse and child neglect. The boy’s mother has been charged with two counts of child neglect and admitted to knowing about the abuse and failing to help him.

The boy and another 4-year-old child were fortunately removed from the home and are now in the custody of the Florida Department of Children and Families.

Police on the case have described the experience that the child endured as “torture.”

“To be honest what this child had gone through was torture,” Detective Erin Lawler told WFTV9. “There was no justification for it in any realm of the world. I’m a mother and seeing what that 11-year-old had to go through, it shocks your soul.”

The abusive parents have now been identified as the boy’s stepfather, Timothy Wilson II, 34, and the boy’s mother Kristen Swann.

“The lesson here for all of us is to recognize when we see something that isn’t right to act on it… This saved the life of a child,” Orlando Police Chief Orlando Rolon said of the incident.

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