Culture

A Mexican Beauty Queen Has Landed In Jail On Kidnapping Charges, Why Does This Keep Happening?

The pageant world is popular in communities all over the planet. From Russia to the U.S. and across Latin America, beauty queens (and kings) strut their stuff on runways and display their many talents. But the pageant world is also known to suffer from a more sinister side that often lands itself in the headlines.

In Mexico, beauty pageants have long been connected to organized crime and international human trafficking rings. Now, one former beauty queen has landed herself in jail in connection to these terrible crimes.

A former Mexican beauty queen has been jailed in connection to a kidnapping ring.

A former Oaxaca beauty queen has been jailed without bail on suspicion of being part of a kidnapping ring operating in the Mexican states of Veracruz and Oaxaca.

Laura Mojica Romero, 25, was Miss Oaxaca in 2018 and the 2020 International Queen of Coffee in Colombia, a beauty pageant at which she represented Mexico. She was arrested Thursday with seven other people in a raid conducted by a federal anti-kidnapping unit after two months of investigation.

A judge on Saturday ruled that Mojica and the seven others will remain in prison for the next two months while authorities continue to gather evidence. Members of the group each face up to 50 years in prison.

Romero had tried to position herself as unique among beauty queens in the country.

Laura Mojica Romero defined herself as “more than a pretty face” during a interview she did in 2019. The 25-year-old, who at that time had just won the Miss Oaxaca contest for the second time, said that the contest had taken an important turn because it highlighted aspects that went “beyond” the contestants’ own beauty.

She put herself out there as an example when remembering that she participated in the delivery of supplies (sweaters, blankets and coats) in remote Indigenous communities and announced that among her future projects included support for the musical education of children from impoverished communities, as well as the formation of women’s entrepreneurship cells; a strategy that she claimed was to combat gender violence.

“We cannot stand idly by, we have to eradicate violence against women, through campaigns and talks that make men aware of this problem,” said the also graduate in Business Administration from the Universidad Veracruzana (UV) to Newsweek Mexico.

Mexico is an international hub for human trafficking.

In its most recent report, the organization Alto al Secuestro warned that the states with the highest incidence of kidnappings are the State of Mexico, with seven; Veracruz, with 12; Oaxaca, with six; Guerrero, with five; and Tabasco, Sinaloa and Mexico City, with four respectively.

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Mexican Singer Ramón Vega Rewrites Roy Orbison’s ‘Oh, Pretty Woman’ in Spanish

Latidomusic

Mexican Singer Ramón Vega Rewrites Roy Orbison’s ‘Oh, Pretty Woman’ in Spanish

Courtesy of SONY MUSIC LATIN

Ramón Vega is taking a classic hit and reinventing it for a new generation. The Mexican singer-songwriter is making history with his debut single “Contigo Mami,” a Spanish take on Roy Orbison’s beloved song “Oh, Pretty Woman.”

Ramón Vega is the youngest Mexican artist to co-write on a Roy Orbison song.

At 15 years old, Vega is the youngest Mexican artist to share a co-write with the late Orbison, who died in December 1988. Orbison’s estate heard Vega’s “Contigo Mami” and signed off on his regional Mexican version of the song.

Orbison took “Oh, Pretty Woman” to the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1964. After his death, the song grew in popularity when it was featured as the theme to the 1990 movie Pretty Woman, which starred Julia Roberts and Richard Gere. Not only is Vega reintroducing the classic to his Latino audience, but he’s also schooling his Gen-Z crowd on the Orbison opus.

“I’m so excited to finally put my first single out,” Vega said in a statement. “Alex and the team really got behind my vision and helped me reach this point. ‘Contigo Mami’ is everything I hoped my sound would be. I can’t wait for you all to hear it.”

Vega updates “Oh, Pretty Woman” with regional Mexican music influence.

Not only does Vega give “Oh, Pretty Woman” a Mexican touch, but there’s also a reggae music influence on “Contigo Mami.” He calls out for the woman of his eye in both Spanish and English, evoking Orbison’s timeless chorus. Vega sounds beyond his years with this familiar yet fresh serenade. In the music video, he’s vibing with a pink-haired girl on a motorcycle.

Vega comes from a family of regional Mexican music stars like his uncle, the late Sergio “El Shaka” Vega, and his older brother, Cornelio Vega Jr.  Eleven years ago Dominican-American pop star Prince Royce carved out a career for himself with his bachata take on Ben E. King’s “Stand By Me.” Expect the same success for Vega with “Contigo Mami.”

READ: Get In The Valentine’s Day Mood With This Playlist Of Spanish-Language Love Songs

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At 78-Years-Old, This Oaxacan Woman Learned To Read And Write And Even Authored An Award-Winning New Book

Things That Matter

At 78-Years-Old, This Oaxacan Woman Learned To Read And Write And Even Authored An Award-Winning New Book

Jorge Fernandez / Getty Images

It’s never too late to follow your dreams. It may sound cliche but one Indigenous woman from the Mexican state of Oaxaca is showing just how true that sentiment really is.

Although growing up knowing how to speak her native language of Náhuatl, she was never able to read or write it – let alone Spanish. Now after years of studying and being too embarrassed to attend classes, this 78-year-old woman can say that she achieved her dream and is now an award-winning author.

Despite being illiterate for years, Justina Rojas has finally finished primary school.

Justina Rojas Flores, a resident of the Oaxacan community of San Miguel Espejo, learned to read and write at 76. She remembers that at first she was embarrassed to attend her classes, but with the support of her teachers sh was motivated to learn the alphabet and words and communication.

In fact, she became so motivated that she’s recently authored a handmade book that earned her a national award. She recently told El Sol de Puebla, that “I was already cracking under pressure because I was cheating a lot, but the teachers told me ‘yes you can, Justina’, so I continued taking classes and it was thanks to them that I learned. After two years, I wrote La Mazorca, which is dedicated to the community of San Miguel Espejo.”

In her Indigenous language of Náhuatl, Rojas shared the history of La Mazorca, which emphasizes the value of appreciating all things – especially that which the land gives us.

“I beg you, if you see me lying on the ground, pick me up, don’t step on me. Just as you take care of me, I will take care of you,” is part of the story in the book that was awarded in 2019 by the State Institute for Adult Education (IEEA), an achievement with which Rojas feels accomplished, and with which motivates other people to enter the competition.

Rojas is proving that it’s never too late to learn something new.

Now, at 78-years-old, Rojas is able to celebrate her achievements. Though she admits that many in her community continue to doubt her real motivation. It’s common to hear people ask ‘Why do I learn if I’m old?’, ‘What use is it going to do?’, and ‘I’m on my way out so it doesn’t matter.’

But many of the people who ask these questions are the same people who don’t have the same opportunities, since they can’t read or write. According to figures from the National Council for the Evaluation of Social Development Policy (Coneval) in Rojas’ community, there are around 2,267 inhabitants, and the majority are living in poverty, a factor that significantly influences educational access. Many, from a very young age, leave school to work to support their families and take jobs working in the fields or construction.

Finally, Rojas wants everyone to know that they should not limit themselves and to embrace knowledge regardless of age. “If you don’t know how to read and write, or if you know someone like that, I invite you to go where they teach, so that those who know more can share their knowledge with us.”

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