Culture

The Concha Burger Is Real And It May Be The Ultimate Food Mashup

The burger, shake, and fries are enduring icons of American cuisine. This greasy, calorie-laden food is the stuff of American folklore. Integral to the iconography of the U.S. of A., burgers are the perfect meal anytime of day, any day. But a group of visionaries, added a twist to the American classic to switch it up a little —for the better. In a time of cultural hybridization, the blending of elements from different cultures, an All-American burger, paired with the quintessentially Mexican pan dulce resulted in the cultural hybrid of dreams. I give you: the concha burger. 

If you, like us, love a good pan dulce as much as you love a juicy burger, Mexican food pop up, El Norte, has something to say to you; ¿Por qué no los dos?

El Norte Kitchen, a Mexican food pop up that specializes in “Norteño” food —food typical of the northern region of Mexico— came up with a sweet and savory creation, that’s the stuff of Mexican-American dreams. Replacing the burger buns for a concha, this new sandwich is a sweet and savory delight that will satisfy both your cravings.

Run by a Latinx family, El Norte’s food has Sonoran roots with an Arizonan touch.

El Norte Kitchen is a Pop-Up Restaurant run by the Allen Family. The pop up creates unique Mexican inspired dining experiences in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. The Latinx family lived in Tucson, Arizona for years, which is why their food is influenced by the culinary delights they tried in their many travels to the southwestern city.

Ben Allen is the head chef and founder of the pop up and he has a deep love affair with Mexican food.

Ben Allen —the chef and owner of El Norte Kitchen— is devoted to Sonoran food, this love stems from his move from Minnesota to Tucson at 19. He had planned on going to school but ended up cooking across several kitchens instead—falling in love with the region’s style of Mexican food in the process.

The team at El Norte Kitchen works hard to innovate and offer their guests an experience that is fun, delicious and unforgettable —I mean, who could forget a concha burger?

Buttered and cut in half, the concha is stuffed with a beef patty, pepper Jack cheese, bacon, jalapeños, and pickled onions. Sadly though, it was a short-lived offer. Ben Allen told Fork Yeah about how they came up with the idea and how excited guests were to get their hands on this little piece of culinary heaven. “We let everybody know ahead of time that it was just kind of a trial and error test run and we’d be doing a limited quantity,” said Allen. “About an hour before we opened that morning for the pop up, we had a full bar waiting for these burgers.” “When we started serving them we actually sold out in about 20 minutes.”

El Norte Kitchen also serves Sonoran-style burritos and hot dogs.

If you’ve never had a Sonoran-style burrito, know that they are worth waiting in line for, outside and around the block. That is, after all, the strength of the pop-up: stuff you can’t get around here anywhere else. Stuff like El Norte burritos, which start with specially ordered flour tortillas, arriving from Arizona, filled and then re-seared on the flat-top to give it a golden patina and crunch. The pop up also serves up Sonoran Hot Dogs, wrapped in bacon, seared, and finished with mayo, beans, and avocado; carne asada fries, perfect churros, and more —hungry yet?

Allen’s favorite burrito is the “California style”

“It’s kind of that all in one meal, you get your steak, you get your French fries, all wrapped in a tortilla. So that was my go to meal on drunk nights or early mornings,” shares Allen. “It was just that one and done.” The California burrito famously has steak, french fries, guacamole, cheese and beans all wrapped up in a bomb of calories and delicious goodness.

Find El Norte Kitchen in St. Paul, Minnesota. Follow their social media or visit their website to find out where they’ll be popping up next.

Cheetos Released The Official Name For The Cheesy Dust Left On Your Fingers And Some People Seriously Hate It

Culture

Cheetos Released The Official Name For The Cheesy Dust Left On Your Fingers And Some People Seriously Hate It

Pixabay

Frito-Lay has declared the cheesy residue left on your fingertips after eating Cheetos is called “cheetle.” Don Cheadle might be feeling some type of way right now. The press release has caused some confusion on social media with many Twitter users refusing to accept that this is the correct terminology and questioning its origins.  

To blow matters perhaps even more out of proportion, actor Ed Helms claims a comedian came up with the word “cheedle” in the 1980s. Some users even pointed out that the term was added to Urban Dictionary in 2005. 

Frito-Lay declares Cheetos dust “Cheetle” in official press release.

“We’ve seen the way Cheetos lovers don their red- and orange-dusted fingers like a badge of honor, and we’re always looking for ways to help them step up their snacking game,” Brandi Ray, senior director of marketing, Frito-Lay North America said in a press release. “The only way to truly take popcorn to the next level is to add the iconic Cheetle, the cheesy dust that will entice Cheetos fans to snack on this popcorn all year long.”

The move to bring Cheetle into the popular lexicon comes as Frito-Lay announces new Cheetos popcorn. The snack is popcorn with Cheetle as a topping in two flavors including Cheddar and Flamin’ Hot. 

“Snacking on Cheetos has become a special experience for many fans, including the experience of having the iconic cheese dust left on your fingers,” Rachel Ferdinando, senior vice president and chief marketing officer of Frito-Lay North America, told TODAY. “We (Frito-Lay executives) have long called that red and orange cheese dust ‘Cheetle,’ but it became clear from our fans the special interest they had, so we knew it was time to share our beloved name for this magic ingredient.”

Where did the term “Cheetle” come from? What is the truth? 

Ferdinando claims that Frito-Lay trademarked the term in 2005. An earlier form of the word was spelled “cheedle.” A 2005 entry in Urban Dictionary defines cheetle as, “the orange, powdery residue left on your fingers after eating Cheetos.” Perhaps, a Frito-Lay employee submitted it? 

“Frito-Lay officially trademarked ‘Cheetle’ in 2005, but the company hasn’t used (it) externally in much capacity until now and haven’t told consumers about it,” Ferdinando said. 

However, the Hangover actor Ed Helms believes the term was invented by Saturday Night Live alumni Rich Hall, who coined “cheedle” in his book sniglets

“An earlier form of Cheetle, spelled cheedle, was found to be one of the sniglets (fun coinages) of comedian Rich Hall in the 1980s, which he defined as ‘the residue left on one’s fingertips after consuming a bag of Cheetos.’ The first known proper use of Cheetle, as such, was found in a finger-painting online computer game as early as 2004 and 2005, after which the name was first popularly defined on Urban Dictionary,” according to Dictionary.com.

Many Twitter users did not know how to feel about Cheetle. 

As can only be expected there were many Don Cheadle jokes, but perhaps the best was the one that differentiated between Don Cheetle (the orange-tanned Donald Trump) and Don Cheadle (the Golden Globe-winning actor). 

Some on Twitter wanted to keep things simple.

Other users were just not feeling the name. Why call Cheetos dust “cheetle” when you can call it “Cheetos dust”?

“I love you Cheetos, but no. It’s Cheeto Dust, end of story. In no world am I ever gonna say I have Cheetle on my fingers, WTF,” one user wrote. 

Helms wasn’t the only one on social media upset that Rich Hall wasn’t getting his due credit. 

“So @Cheetos thinks they have come up with the perfect name of the dusty cheesy residue left on your fingers… Sorry, the name Cheetle was used by Rich Hall on NNTN as one of his @SnigletsOFC back in the ’80s,” another user wrote. 

The future is still unwritten, who knows if the term “cheetle” will ever catch on? Personally, I don’t converse about Cheetos enough for it to ever come up casually. Nevertheless, Frito-Lay’s branding effort clearly worked: we’re all talking about cheetle today.

As If The Surreal Movie Adaptation Of ‘Cats’ Wasn’t Trippy Enough, People Are Watching It High And Omg The Reactions

Entertainment

As If The Surreal Movie Adaptation Of ‘Cats’ Wasn’t Trippy Enough, People Are Watching It High And Omg The Reactions

Cats / Amblin Entertainment

From what reviewers and audiences have been saying about Cats, the surreal nature of the movie probably doesn’t need to be enhanced by adding psychedelic drugs. However, that didn’t stop adventurous moviegoers from sampling their drug of choice before sitting through the weird musical —to make the experience even weirder.

For most people, “Cats” is unnerving enough sober.

It tells the story of a group of singing, dancing alley cats who compete for the chance to go to the Heaviside Layer, a metaphor for death and rebirth into the next of their nine lives. Critics have described the movie adaptation as a feverish drug dream, a bad trip. It is expected to lose as much as $100 million, according to Variety. The budget, mind you, was more than $95 million, all going to a rushed production that found the film’s visuals still being cooked even after the movie opened wide over the Christmas holiday.

People are watching the movie on drugs—and their experiences are nothing short of wild.

According to a sweeping new story by The Washington Post, a fraction of that box-office take is coming from audience members who are seeing the movie on drugs, and the results are evidently transcendent. WaPo rounded up some of the best reactions from viewers that saw the movie on mind-altering substances as shrooms, LSD, edibles, and more.

The paper offered a list of compelling, if not encouraging, responses:

“The most terrifying experience of my life. I swear to God my soul escaped me.”

I mean this is a bit dramatic…right?

“Vomited four times but ultimately understood the film on a deep level.”

Now this is definitely a reaction that I think only a high person could have. If you’ve seen the movie, you know it’s true.

“Had a panic attack in the middle of it …”

I feel like this could happen whether you were high or not…

Raina, 25, from South Carolina, said she couldn’t handle the mismatched proportions of the furry animals.

She lasted 10 minutes, “and then I went to the AMC bathroom and threw up”.

Annaliese Nielsen, terrified by the furry face of James Corden, called the film “a special kind of evil”.

That last scene especially, is freaking people out.

Here Judi Dench’s Deuteronomy breaks the fourth wall to address the viewer, and freaks people out. “When Judi Dench turned and looked me directly in the eyes to let me know that a cat is not a dog, I was terrified.”

The movie may be hard to follow if you’re looking for a plot.

Because there is no plot. Basically all the cats —as portrayed by the likes of Rebel Wilson, Jennifer Hudson, Dench, Idris Elba, Ian McKellen, and Taylor Swift— are auditioning for eternal life in the Heaviside Layer, a heaven-like place of rebirth for cats in the upper atmosphere.

“Where their fur ends and their human hands start, it would move in a weird unnatural way,” one audience member told The Washington Post.

“I felt like I was losing my mind…I was just concentrating on taking deep breaths.”

Of course, your choice of whether to enhance the experience of Cats is yours —and your state’s— own, but from what we’ve seen, the movie is likely weird enough to simulate a drug trip without needing to consume them at all.