Culture

Here’s A Collection Of Grad Caps That Are Giving All Of The Credit To Their Immigrant Parents And Grandparents

One of the most significant moments for migrant families is a graduation ceremony. These are often the culmination of years of hard work, sacrifice and sometimes struggle from those who arrived to the United States (or any other developed country) first. Some of these families have gone through truly epic journeys that span generations and are full of struggles, luck, and love. A college graduation in any Latino familia es la gran cosa where the whole family participates and, most importantly, feels incredibly proud of academic achievements.

We all know that Latinos at graduation know the struggle of making sure the whole family is included. 

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Second generation Latinos are an important part of the workforce and are helping shape U.S. culture. However, there is still much more to do in terms of getting Latino youth in college. According to The Hechinger Report, “fewer than a quarter, or 22.6 percent, of Latino Americans ages 25 to 64 held a two-year college degree or higher in 2016.” The policies implemented by the current administration, particularly in relation to the Dreamer Act, threaten to make that gap even bigger.

Here are some examples of graduation regalia, and even cakes, that scream estamos orgullosos de ser Latinos y immigranters. If you’re reading this and are doubtful about going to college, here’s our advice: do it! It will be beneficial to you and your community. Education is one of the best paths towards personal and community betterment. As Latino presence becomes stronger in areas such as politics and business, we will need more prepared young people of Hispanic heritage. Many of you have an advantage already: you are bilingual. How many gringos can say the same?

This florecita rebelde is everything we never knew we needed.

Credit: huertaolivia / Instagram

We just adore Olivia’s whole outfit, which screams Latino power. From the vivid colors on her dress to the awesome flower arrangement on her cap, which is big and makes a bold statement: we are vivarachos and proud of it. Nothing more powerful to celebrate the cultural melting pot that is the US than to showcase your culture.

Some of these caps just show how proud people are of being Latino.

Credit: paula_yannet / Instagram

One thing that Latinas, in particular, are doing in the United States is smashing the glass ceilings imposed by Anglo culture and the patriarchy. The message on this amazing young woman’s cap says it all: “Latina breaking statistics”. SI SE PUEDE.

Say it conmigo: Dominican brains and attitude can’t be beaten.

Credit: leo_navarro91 / Instagram

We love this amazing graduation cap that sends a clear message: proud to be Dominican. Among U.S. Latinos, Dominicans are both recipients of stupid prejudices and owners of a rich culture. Graduates from this community include, for example, Pulitzer Prize winner Junot Diaz, who writes in Spanglish and has slain grammatical conventions of what “proper” English is supposed to be.

There’s nothing more powerful than an immigrant superstar.

Credit: a_rod719 / Instagram

We just love this graduation cap from a chicano young man. It is sparkly, reminds us of “American Idol”and tells a truth that is uncomfortable for some cabrones conservadores: immigration brings cultural and intellectual richness to any country.

Yes we can esa es la actitud, compadre.

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One of the mottos of the Mexican-American community is: si se pudo. Its literal translation is “Yes we can” (sounds familiar? did anyone say Obama circa 2008?). This is the type of attitude that gets many Latinos through college, which can be a challenge not only academically, but also in terms of social inclusion. The stickers are interesting. They kinda remind us of childhood scrapbooks.

Some of these grad caps are truly works of art.

Credit: stickydecalco / Instagram

We love this one. It takes a quote from the famous song “Imagine” by John Lennon and turns it into a statement about the Dreamer generation. Can we send this to the White House, porfas? 

You can always show your own pride for your immigrant parents using this mitú grad cap sticker.

Credit: mitú

Your parents came here for a reason, mijo, and you’ve made them happier than you will ever know. That’s why our “Proud Son Of Immigrants” Graduation Cap Sticker is the perfect way to tell them you’re proud of your roots!

Anti-immigration rhetoric is really, really a real pendejada and we can’t let it happen anymore.

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Words are powerful, and the way in which a certain politician with the initials DT described Mexican immigrants has caused a lot of harm in terms of U.S.-Mexico relations, as well as in how whole communities are treated. That is why we love this graduation cap: it makes a clear political statement. This amazing girl is the face of millions of talented migrants who are not gang members or drug dealers: they are spirited, resilient and the true face of today’s American Dream. 

The sentiment behind this grad cap is as beautiful as the rainbow in the background.

Credit: stickydecalco / Instagram

The message on the cap reads: “To my parents, who arrived with nothing and gave me everything.” This is giving us serious feels. The story of so many families that have made the United States their home and whose kids are now thriving as trabajo duro has paid off.

This seriously gives us butterflies in our panzas.

Credit: stickydecalco / Instagram

This message is quite poetic and amazing. “(I am here) because of the roots you gave me, which turned into wings. Thanks, mom and dad”. This girl is totally thankful for her viejitos and acknowledges that being true to oneself, to our roots, is where any success story begins.

Charro stoles? Yes, por favor.

Credit: casitamadgalena / Instagram

This is a big trend in Latino regalia. These stoles fashioned in the style of Mexican ponchos are both cool and scream pride. There are many possible color combos, and they can be personalized. It would be a great graduation gift for your carnales or primos.

First-generation college grads are setting a standard that will change the course of their family history.

Credit: jcrafts.business / Instagram

The Mexican flag is the hero of this graduation cap that reveals how finishing college is not a personal effort. Behind every sleepless night studying there is a family that offers support and care, and whose efforts have led to the stage. 

A beautiful day indeed. Congrats, graduate.

Credit: stickydecalco / Instagram

One of the main obstacles professional young women face is that whenever they are assertive in demonstrating their talent, they are immediately categorized as show-offs. That is why we love this cap that celebrates those women that do not hold back in giving themselves a big thumbs up (AOC, we hear ya!).

There is something so sweet about people giving their parents the most important acknowledgment.

Credit: Instagram. @stickydecalco

This is one of our favorites. It reads: “They worked with their hands so I could work with my mind. Thanks, dad and mom.” Many migrants have to make a living through manual work, which is often unjustly paid. This cap is a great gracias for parental efforts that allow the younger generations to enter the professional world. We are sure this kid’s mum and dad were bursting with orgullo.

Immigration makes the world go round and keeps economies growing and thriving. #FACT

Credit: web. Digital image. Refinery 29. 

Another political statement. It does not need further explanation. We love it. There is no reason why people should fear immigrants from entering the workforce. After all, if you are as good as you say you are, then an immigrant wouldn’t be able to “steal your job.”

Gratitude is the attitude that keeps us all connected with our familias.

Credit: @_nancybarragan / Twitter

Migrating to a different country, particularly if it is done the hard way, is not an easy feat. There is nothing that gives a migrant parent as much joy as seeing their offspring walk the stake and throw their caps to the sky. We love Nancy and her cute family, and we wish her the absolute best for the years to come.

Let’s celebrate the Venezuelan style and give our parents something to celebrate.

Credit: mappyscake / Instagram

Of course, there are also colorful and very Latino graduation cakes such as this one that showcases Venezuelan culture. It might not be a cap but it is something that definitely speaks to our experience in a family of immigrants.

Congratulations to all of the graduates from high school and college who are making a mark on this world.

READ: 22 #Immigrad Graduation Caps That No Dummy Can Ignore

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A Federal Court Just Ended Temporary Protected Status For More Than 300,000 Immigrants, Here’s What You Need To Know

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A Federal Court Just Ended Temporary Protected Status For More Than 300,000 Immigrants, Here’s What You Need To Know

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

A federal court just handed a huge ‘victory’ to the Trump administration, which has been eager to restart mass deportations. Despite a global health pandemic, the administration has been pressing forward with plans to deport hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants.

Until now, many of these migrants were safe from deportation thanks to Temporary Protected Status, which shields some immigrants from deportation under humanitarian claims. However, the recent court decision – in San Francisco’s 9th Circuit – gives Trump exactly what he wants right before the elections.

But how will it affect immigrant communities across the country? Here’s everything you need to know about this major decision.

The 9th Circuit Court just ended TPS for more than 300,000 undocumented immigrants.

A California appeals court on Monday gave the Trump Administration permission to end Temporary Protected Status for immigrants from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti, and Sudan, clearing the way for officials to force more than 300,000 immigrants out of the country.

The decision affects people from all walks of life, many of whom have lived in the U.S. for decades, have U.S.-born children and have been considered essential workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

This week’s ruling from the circuit court comes after a district court (also in California) temporarily halted Trump’s plan to end TPS in late 2018 after a group of lawyers sued, arguing that Trump was motivated by racial discrimination.

“The president’s vile statements about TPS holders made perfectly clear that his administration acted out of racial animus,”Ahilan Arulanantham, a lawyer for the ACLU of Southern California, wrote in a statement. “The Constitution does not permit policy to be driven by racism. We will seek further review of the court’s decision.”

But today’s 2-1 decision reversed the district court’s temporary order and allowed the federal government to take away TPS protections while the court case continues.

ICE and DHS has promised to wait several months before taking away TPS status if the agency won in court. As a result, the ACLU told NPR that it expects the protections to start ending no sooner than March, meaning that Joe Biden could reverse the administration’s decision if he wins in November, though the organization plans to fight back in the meantime.

Temporary Protected Status was created to protect people in the U.S. from being sent back to dangerous places – and it’s saved lives.

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The TPS program was first introduced in 1990, and it has protected immigrants from more than 20 countries at various points since then. More than 300,000 people from 10 different nations currently use the program, some of whom have lived and worked in the United States for decades.

Trump has sharply criticized the program, sometimes along racial lines, and in one infamous and widely criticized incident two years ago, the president reportedly referred to the program’s beneficiaries as “people from shithole countries.”

TPS provides protection for short periods of up to 18 months, but the federal government has continuously extended it for the countries mentioned in the lawsuit “based on repeated findings that it remains unsafe to return.” 

As a result, it said, most TPS holders have been living in the U.S. for more than a decade, contributing to their communities and raising their families. Many of the more than 200,000 U.S.-citizen children of TPS holders have never been to the country their parents are from and would have to choose between their families and their homes.

The ruling will have a major impact on migrant families and communities across the U.S.

Credit: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Immigration advocacy groups are slamming the court’s ruling, noting it will impact hundreds of thousands of TPS holders as well as their families and communities. In a statement, Beth Werlin, executive director of the American Immigration Council, said the decision will “plunge their lives into further turmoil at a time when we all need greater certainty.” 

As the global pandemic stretches on, immigrants with protected status make up a large portion of the country’s front-line workers. More than 130,000 TPS recipients are essential workers, according to the Center for American Progress. 

“TPS recipients have deep economic and social roots in communities across the nation,” said Ali Noorani, president and CEO of the National Immigration Forum. “And, as the U.S. responds to the COVID-19 pandemic, TPS recipients are standing shoulder to shoulder with Americans and doing essential work.”

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Nearly 9,000 Unaccompanied Child Migrants Have Been Expelled From the U.S. Under Trump’s COVID-19 Restrictions

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Nearly 9,000 Unaccompanied Child Migrants Have Been Expelled From the U.S. Under Trump’s COVID-19 Restrictions

On Friday, previously undisclosed court documents revealed that almost 9,000 unaccompanied migrant children seeking refuge were denied access to the U.S. and subsequently expelled from U.S. soil. None of these children were given a chance in court.

According to reporting done by CBS News, U.S. Department of Homeland Security officials have “suspended humanitarian protections” for most migrants crossing the border, on the grounds that “public health law overrides asylum, immigration and anti-trafficking safeguards” in the era of COVID-19.

CBS news made the shocking discovery when investigating the problematic and increased practice of holding and detaining minors in unregulated, privately contracted hotel rooms.

The government is arguing that the practice is keeping the American public safe from possibly COVID-19 exposure from unauthorized migrants.

“What we’re trying to do…is remove all individuals, regardless of whether they’re children — minors — or they’re adults,” Customs and Border Patrol official Mark Morgan said in an August media briefing.

He continued: “We’re trying to remove [the migrants] as fast as we can, to not put them in our congregate settings, to not put them into our system, to not have them remain in the United States for a long period of time, therefore increasing the exposure risk of everybody they come in contact with.”

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But critics are claiming that the Trump Administration is using COVID-19 as an excuse to unlawfully expel as many migrants as possible–regardless of their age.

On Friday, federal Judge Dolly M. Gee ordered the administration to put an end to the practice of detaining children in hotel rooms, saying that hotels do not “adequately account for the vulnerability of unaccompanied minors in detention”. She asked the government to put an end to the practice by September 15th.

It is in the court documents regarding the above case that 8,800 expelled migrant children number was revealed.

“The numbers are stunning,” said executive director of the Immigrant Defenders Law Center, Lindsay Toczylowski, to CBS News. “…To find out that our government has literally taken children who are seeking protection and sent them back to the very places they fled in such high numbers really took my breath away.”

via Getty Images

US Border Patrol Deputy Chief Raul Ortiz has defended the unsafe hotel detainment and speedy expulsion of migrant children, saying that stopping the practice would increase risk of exposure to health and customs officials alike.

But even if the practice comes to an end, the staggering number of unaccompanied migrant and refugee children left to their own devices is sitting heavy on the soul of advocates and activists.

“It’s just completely contrary, not only to all child protection norms and standards, but also just completely contrary to our values as a nation around protecting the most vulnerable,” said vice president for international programs at Kids in Need of Defense Lisa Frydman to CNN. “Because we are just wholesale shipping them out without making sure that it’s safe for them to go.”

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