Culture

Patty Delgado Is Changing The World Of Latino Fashion With Her Own Store Hija De Tu Madre

Patty Delgado doesn’t consider herself a trailblazer or even a trendsetter. Yet, the 26-year-old designer is making a name for herself in the fashion world with her colorful embellished denim jackets. Delgado traveled to Mexico City for six months in 2015 and it was there that she discovered something big. She bought an appliqué of the Virgen de Guadalupe (Our Lady of Guadalupe) and instantly knew she needed to put it somewhere special. She choose her old faded Levi’s denim jean jacket. Instantly, she knew this was going to be much bigger.

Patty Delgado started Hija de tu Madre November 2016 and she hasn’t looked back since.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I felt an instant connection to the jacket because of what the Virgen means to a lot of Latinos, especially immigrant families,” Delgado recalls. “I knew this was going to be a hit and told myself going forward I’m going to make these jackets.”

Fast forward three years later, Delgado opened up a showroom this month for her brand Hija de tu Madre.

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The intimate space is located in Mariachi Plaza in the heart of LA’s Latino neighborhood Boyle Heights. Delgado grew up in Boyle Heights and understands the importance of having her business in the predominately Latino neighborhood.

“It made sense for me to have a space owned by a Latina that was born in this neighborhood,” Delgado says. “This was the perfect opportunity to plant my roots right here in Boyle Heights.”

Customers can find her showroom in the heart of East Los Angeles.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

The first thing that greets visitors upon entering her showroom is a giant mural of the Virgen de Guadalupe and a restroom that features the words “Get It Girl” that has been a popular location for pictures. The intention of the studio is to experience what Hija de tu Madre represents rather than a regular store. People can stop by and take pictures and try on jackets and get more of a feel of what Delgado’s brand truly is about.

“People come here and they just want to take a photo and model in the jackets,” Delgado says. “That’s what this space is for and I’m glad I can share this with my people.”

She’s sold her Latino-inspired denim jackets around the world from Texas all the way to France.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“A lot of the ideas I get come from a place of nostalgia. Hija de tu Madre was basically my childhood nickname,” Delgado says. “I like to pull things from my family all the time like cousins say “ya guey’ all the time and I made a phone case that says that now.”

Her most known and best selling item has been a denim jacket with colorful sequins with the image of the Virgen de Guadalupe. The jacket rose her to social media fame and now sells other items that remind her of identity like gold necklaces with phrases like ‘Bruja’ and ‘Me Vale’.

Delgado credits much of her inspiration from her travels to Mexico City where she found not only her passion but self-identity.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

The UCLA graduate never saw herself in this position as she was always behind the scenes when it came to design. She studied religious studies in college, which she credits in helping find her interest with cultural motifs she utilizes on her designs. After various digital branding and fashion design gigs, she found a sense of purpose with these denim jackets.

“I was always interested in religious symbols and iconography, that’s why I incorporate that so much into my designs,” Patty says. “Sometimes I get people that tell me ‘Oh my god, you’re selling religion!’ but I say I’m not selling religion. I’m selling reminders of identity and nostalgia,” Delgado says.

Delgado adds: “I feel that we are owners of our images and these are just reminders of our heritage and culture.”

She hopes to inspire the next generation of Latinx designers and creators.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I come from a family of entrepreneurs and they’ve been so proud of the way I’ve been able to make a name for myself through social media.” Delgado says. “So I say give yourself the opportunity to take a risk, People will be really surprised to see what happens when they stop listening to that place of doubt in their heads and put it in silent mode.”


READ: This Fashion Designer Is Turning San Marcos Blankets Into Stunning Streetwear

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Sports Illustrated Featured Valentina Sampaio As Their First Trans Model And The Images Are Stunning

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Sports Illustrated Featured Valentina Sampaio As Their First Trans Model And The Images Are Stunning

She might be listed as part of Sports Illustrated’s 2020 “rookies, but Brazilian model Valentina Sampaio is hardly one herself. In 2017, the model made waves when she became the first trans woman to appear on the cover of Vogue Paris. With appearances on the catwalks of Victoria Secret and appearances for L’Oréal, she’s been breaking barriers ever since.

Now, three years after making her first big splash, the Brazilian model is making waves for Sports Illustrated.

Joining the likes of models such as Tyra Banks, Christie Brinkley and Heidi Klum, Sampaio’s feature on Sports Illustrated makes for another first. As a transwoman, she became the first trans model to appear in its pages and spoke out in an open essay on what it means to be part of the brand.

“Being trans usually means facing closed doors to peoples’ hearts and minds. We face snickers, insults, fearful reactions and physical violations just for existing. Our options for growing up in a loving and accepting family, having a fruitful experience at school or finding dignified work are unimaginably limited and challenging,” Sampaio wrote. “I recognize that I am one of the fortunate ones, and my intention is to honor that as best I can.”

Reflecting on her humble beginnings in a fishing village in northern Brazil, Sampaio explained that she intends to use her growing platform to fight for trans rights.

Writing about the beauty of her home country, Sampaio explained that its lovely visuals are darkened by a backdrop of brutal crimes against the transgender community. “I was born trans in a remote, humble fishing village in northern Brazil. Brazil is a beautiful country, but it also hosts the highest number of violent crimes and murders against the trans community in the world—three times that of the U.S,” she wrote. In a previous interview with Vogue, Sampaio highlighted that in 2019, 129 transgender people had been murdered in Brazil.

“What unites us as humans is that we all share the common desire to be accepted and loved for who we are,” Sampaio wrote in the essay. “Thank you SI for seeing and respecting me as I truly am. For understanding that more than anything, I am human. Thank you for supporting me in continuing to spread a message of love, compassion, and unity for ALL.”

Karen Vega Becomes The First Oaxacan Model To Grace Pages Of Vogue Mexico

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Karen Vega Becomes The First Oaxacan Model To Grace Pages Of Vogue Mexico

voguemexico/ Instagram

According to the National Commission for the Development of the Indigenous Peoples, Oaxaca has the greatest percentage of indigenous people in Mexico. Making up 48% of the population in Oaxaca, Mexico the indigenous group continues to flourish and influence Mexican culture to this day. And yet, despite their prevalence and contributions, Oaxacans remain sorely underrepresented in Mexico and Latin America. Only recently, with the rising attention towards actress Yalitza Aparicio, have most mainstream outlets featured the indigenous people of Oaxaca on their screens and magazine pages.

Fortunately, that doesn’t seem to be slowing down.

Karen Vega broke barriers recently after becoming the first Oaxacan model to be featured in Vogue Mexico

Just 18 years old, the model graced the magazine’s pages and spoke out about the importance of seeing more diversity in the world of fashion. “It is time for new generations to have media that show them expressions of equality and educate them about the differences that make us all beautiful,” Vega told the outlet. “My grain of sand would be to put the focus on the southern woman, our stories, where we come from so that more than just photo models, we can also be an inspiration of another kind.”

According to Vogue Mexico, Vega’s journey began at the age of 14 when she helped her abuelo’s wife with her business as a seamstress.

At the time, Vega helped her measure out the dresses that she made for a local fashion form. According to Vega, she quickly fell in love with the world of fashion and began to dream about modeling as a profession. Using social media sites as her instruction guide, she began to obtain an understanding of what fashion meant. She flipped through the pages of magazines and began connecting with models to understand how to break into the world of modeling. Soon enough, after receiving an invite from the designer Pompi García and the photographer Enrique Leyva to model for part of the production “Magical Realism” in the city of Oaxaca she found herself on the path to a professional career in modeling.

She went on to join García and Leyva’s modeling agency, Talento Espina. The agency strives to represent Oaxacan models and ultimately helped Vega receive an invite to participate in an Autumn-Winter show in Mexico City.

“At first there was a lot of doubt about my participation, because although it was a very nice opportunity, the move and my parents’ confidence to leave was difficult, since it was the first time I was leaving Oaxaca,” Vega told Vogue. Fortunately, Vega’s agency was able to help her older brother come along with her.

Now she’s modeling for big brands like Vogue and says its thanks to her agency which taught her to never tolerate abuse from people who hired her and to speak up. According to Vega, working with her agency has taught her that while pursuing her dreams of modeling will come with its struggles because of her Indigenous origins it’s not at all impossible.