Culture

Patty Delgado Is Changing The World Of Latino Fashion With Her Own Store Hija De Tu Madre

Patty Delgado doesn’t consider herself a trailblazer or even a trendsetter. Yet, the 26-year-old designer is making a name for herself in the fashion world with her colorful embellished denim jackets. Delgado traveled to Mexico City for six months in 2015 and it was there that she discovered something big. She bought an appliqué of the Virgen de Guadalupe (Our Lady of Guadalupe) and instantly knew she needed to put it somewhere special. She choose her old faded Levi’s denim jean jacket. Instantly, she knew this was going to be much bigger.

Patty Delgado started Hija de tu Madre November 2016 and she hasn’t looked back since.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I felt an instant connection to the jacket because of what the Virgen means to a lot of Latinos, especially immigrant families,” Delgado recalls. “I knew this was going to be a hit and told myself going forward I’m going to make these jackets.”

Fast forward three years later, Delgado opened up a showroom this month for her brand Hija de tu Madre.

2018 is that you? 👀✨📸 by @_angelguerra

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The intimate space is located in Mariachi Plaza in the heart of LA’s Latino neighborhood Boyle Heights. Delgado grew up in Boyle Heights and understands the importance of having her business in the predominately Latino neighborhood.

“It made sense for me to have a space owned by a Latina that was born in this neighborhood,” Delgado says. “This was the perfect opportunity to plant my roots right here in Boyle Heights.”

Customers can find her showroom in the heart of East Los Angeles.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

The first thing that greets visitors upon entering her showroom is a giant mural of the Virgen de Guadalupe and a restroom that features the words “Get It Girl” that has been a popular location for pictures. The intention of the studio is to experience what Hija de tu Madre represents rather than a regular store. People can stop by and take pictures and try on jackets and get more of a feel of what Delgado’s brand truly is about.

“People come here and they just want to take a photo and model in the jackets,” Delgado says. “That’s what this space is for and I’m glad I can share this with my people.”

She’s sold her Latino-inspired denim jackets around the world from Texas all the way to France.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“A lot of the ideas I get come from a place of nostalgia. Hija de tu Madre was basically my childhood nickname,” Delgado says. “I like to pull things from my family all the time like cousins say “ya guey’ all the time and I made a phone case that says that now.”

Her most known and best selling item has been a denim jacket with colorful sequins with the image of the Virgen de Guadalupe. The jacket rose her to social media fame and now sells other items that remind her of identity like gold necklaces with phrases like ‘Bruja’ and ‘Me Vale’.

Delgado credits much of her inspiration from her travels to Mexico City where she found not only her passion but self-identity.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

The UCLA graduate never saw herself in this position as she was always behind the scenes when it came to design. She studied religious studies in college, which she credits in helping find her interest with cultural motifs she utilizes on her designs. After various digital branding and fashion design gigs, she found a sense of purpose with these denim jackets.

“I was always interested in religious symbols and iconography, that’s why I incorporate that so much into my designs,” Patty says. “Sometimes I get people that tell me ‘Oh my god, you’re selling religion!’ but I say I’m not selling religion. I’m selling reminders of identity and nostalgia,” Delgado says.

Delgado adds: “I feel that we are owners of our images and these are just reminders of our heritage and culture.”

She hopes to inspire the next generation of Latinx designers and creators.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I come from a family of entrepreneurs and they’ve been so proud of the way I’ve been able to make a name for myself through social media.” Delgado says. “So I say give yourself the opportunity to take a risk, People will be really surprised to see what happens when they stop listening to that place of doubt in their heads and put it in silent mode.”


READ: This Fashion Designer Is Turning San Marcos Blankets Into Stunning Streetwear

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Not Even Danny Trejo Has A Celebrity Face Tattoo

Entertainment

Not Even Danny Trejo Has A Celebrity Face Tattoo

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It’s 2020 and face tattoos are the new normal. While the distinguishing ink has a rich history that traces all of the ways back to Ancient Greece and China, today’s tattoo du jour is notably born from some mutual understanding that subversive acts like a spiderweb tatt on your elbow or bleaching your heard are no longer enough.

Amber Rose 

The mother of two has said she truly took the death of Kobe Bryant to heart and was inspired to tattoo her children’s names on her forehead.

Presley Gerber

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Thanks homie 😈 @jonboytattoo

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When Cindy Crawford’s son and model Presley Gerber tattooed the lower part of his eye fans were shocked. Mostly because as it turns out, no matter how much they liked him they were “misunderstood” about him. The young model’s choice to tattoo the word on his face was baffling decision.

Post Malone

Post Malone might just be the reason why face tattoos took flight this year. The American rapper has a number of face tattoos including the words “Stay Away” on his forehead, and “always tired” under both of his eyes.

Aaron Carter

Speaking to Entertainment Tonight in a recent interview, the pop star explained that his face tattoo was done in honor of his career. According to Carter his tattoo is an image of Greek monster Medusa who Carter sees as his protector.

Justin Bieber

Yep, the once cleaned up teen hearthrob also has face ink. Though his are a bit more discreet Bieber does have a small cross under his left eye and the word “grace” above his right eyebrow.

Halsey

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👽👽 WICKED THING 👽👽

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Halsey also has a small tattoo that is very difficult to recognize. It’s very discreet and hard to spot. Her face tattoo is made up of a red diamond with a “Q” above it. It’s just in front of one of her ears.

These are just some of your favorite stars who have face tattoos that mean something very important to them. They’re very unique and it is one of their ways of expressing themselves. 

In A World Where Everything Is Catered To White People, Selena Quintanilla Has Long Been The Splash Of Color My Latina Soul Needed

Fierce

In A World Where Everything Is Catered To White People, Selena Quintanilla Has Long Been The Splash Of Color My Latina Soul Needed

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Long before shops the likes of Urban Outfitters and Forever 21 began to bank on her image to sell $54 shirts to non-Latinx hipsters, Selena Quintanilla-Pérez was an icon and legend for young Latinas living across the globe. Ask a Latina and no doubt she has some sort of connection the Tejano singer whether its coordinating sons to “Baila Esta Cumbia” with her primas or playing her VHS biopic on repeat until the tape ran thin. The queen of Latinx music will always be an influential personality in Latino culture in the United States. Her music and the tragic circumstances of her death made her a pop culture phenomenon that escaped the niche Hispanic market. After her death, Hollywood studios furiously vied for the rights to adapt her incredible rags-to-riches story to the big screen. Selena is a fundamental Latino icon even 23 years after her death in 1995, at the tender age of 23.

Next time someone asks you at a party why you tear up listening to the late great Selena, be sure to serve them with these facts:

1. She brought Tejano music to mainstream America and proved women are capable of anything.

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She is amazing 😍 #selenaquintanilla#90s#fashion

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Before Selena Mexican-American music was considered an eccentricity and was definitely not played in non-Hispanic clubs and radio stations.  Speaking about the experience of being a Latinx signer, Selena once said “Tejano music was hard for us because I was a girl. My dad had a lot of problems while trying to set up shows for us or presentations because there are a lot of men who don’t think that women can get the attention of the public. But . . . wrong!” No doubt the Texas-born singer changed these harsh attitude during her life and after her untimely death.

2. She valued family

Selena might have gained worldwide notoriety in her own right, but long before she was just Selena she had a career as part of the Quintanilla family group Selena y Los Dinos, where her two older siblings also made pompas shake. Like the rest of us, familia was always important to Selena and she never forgot her origins and the role that her family had in her success. Speaking about the struggles she was grateful for enduring with her family, Selena said “We went through a hard time, and we had to turn to music as a means to putting food on the table. And we’ve been doing it ever since. No regrets either.”

3. She was proud of her heritage

Singing in Spanish when you’re not fluent can be a pretty challenging act in itself if you want to break into the mainstream, and Selena was unapologetic about her efforts to do so. “I feel very proud to be Mexican,” Selena once said in an interview about her culture. “I didn’t have the opportunity to learn Spanish when I was a girl, but . . . it’s never too late to get in touch with your roots.” Many singers and actors of Latino origin change their names for a more English-sounding or a more neutral one. But not our Selena. She didn’t look for a fancy name and good on her: Selena is such a powerful, defining name that shines on any billboard.

4. She knew that not all women are straight-sized and many have curves

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, they say, but it has long been dictated by mass media which has, in so many cases, severely distorted our perceptions of women’s bodies. Selena was proud of her curves. Eso mija, eres una fregona.  “I’m very real, very sincere, and honest, and that’s how I’ll always be,” the star once said in an interview. 

5. She had a unique style

Amidst the customary images and selling points of whitewashed media and the current political turmoils of today, it can be hard for a Latina to feel confident in her identity. Selena did so with aplomb. Her wardrobe choices were interesting and daring in equal measure, which is probably one of the reasons behind her success as a pop culture brand.  She was criticized by more conservative audiences for “revealing too much”. We say al carajo con sus juicios.  Still, the Tejano singer stayed strong her opinions about her self, saying once, “Always believe that the impossible is always possible.”

6. Because she showed that Latinas can be captains of their fate as well as the fiercest activists.

“What I don’t like are arrogant people. We’re all equal. I don’t like it when a person assumes to be better,” Quintanilla once stated in an interview.  Her posthumous campaign with cosmetics giant MAC demonstrated that Latino women in particular and women of color, in general, could and should carry campaigns. She was beautiful and the world needed to see that.

7. She was active in her community “All I need to do is try and do the best that I can do”

As a minority, solidarity is key for the Latino community in the United States, particularly today. Selena embodied community values and never forgot her fellow Mexican-Americans. Certainly an example we should all follow. She grew up in Texas, where migratory patterns and backwards thinking about race make various segments of the Hispanic population feel vulnerable. Power to the people!

8. She urged children to stay en la escuela (don’t drop out, escuincles!)

“Music is not a very stable business. You know it comes and it goes, and so does money. But your education stays with you for the rest of your life.” Selena knew how important education is for minorities in the United States, and that hard work and academic development are the only way for the community to strive. She constantly visited schools and urged young chamacos not to drop out. Respect.

9. Because she was an independent self-made woman “If you have a dream, don’t let anybody take it away”

She was young but life taught her that all you have is yourself. We can’t believe she was just 23 when she died. Truly wise beyond her years.

Read: Mariah Carey Got Real About Being Biracial And Her Words Will Undoubtedly Have Afro-Latinas Feeling So Seen

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