Culture

Patty Delgado Is Changing The World Of Latino Fashion With Her Own Store Hija De Tu Madre

Patty Delgado doesn’t consider herself a trailblazer or even a trendsetter. Yet, the 26-year-old designer is making a name for herself in the fashion world with her colorful embellished denim jackets. Delgado traveled to Mexico City for six months in 2015 and it was there that she discovered something big. She bought an appliqué of the Virgen de Guadalupe (Our Lady of Guadalupe) and instantly knew she needed to put it somewhere special. She choose her old faded Levi’s denim jean jacket. Instantly, she knew this was going to be much bigger.

Patty Delgado started Hija de tu Madre November 2016 and she hasn’t looked back since.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I felt an instant connection to the jacket because of what the Virgen means to a lot of Latinos, especially immigrant families,” Delgado recalls. “I knew this was going to be a hit and told myself going forward I’m going to make these jackets.”

Fast forward three years later, Delgado opened up a showroom this month for her brand Hija de tu Madre.

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The intimate space is located in Mariachi Plaza in the heart of LA’s Latino neighborhood Boyle Heights. Delgado grew up in Boyle Heights and understands the importance of having her business in the predominately Latino neighborhood.

“It made sense for me to have a space owned by a Latina that was born in this neighborhood,” Delgado says. “This was the perfect opportunity to plant my roots right here in Boyle Heights.”

Customers can find her showroom in the heart of East Los Angeles.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

The first thing that greets visitors upon entering her showroom is a giant mural of the Virgen de Guadalupe and a restroom that features the words “Get It Girl” that has been a popular location for pictures. The intention of the studio is to experience what Hija de tu Madre represents rather than a regular store. People can stop by and take pictures and try on jackets and get more of a feel of what Delgado’s brand truly is about.

“People come here and they just want to take a photo and model in the jackets,” Delgado says. “That’s what this space is for and I’m glad I can share this with my people.”

She’s sold her Latino-inspired denim jackets around the world from Texas all the way to France.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“A lot of the ideas I get come from a place of nostalgia. Hija de tu Madre was basically my childhood nickname,” Delgado says. “I like to pull things from my family all the time like cousins say “ya guey’ all the time and I made a phone case that says that now.”

Her most known and best selling item has been a denim jacket with colorful sequins with the image of the Virgen de Guadalupe. The jacket rose her to social media fame and now sells other items that remind her of identity like gold necklaces with phrases like ‘Bruja’ and ‘Me Vale’.

Delgado credits much of her inspiration from her travels to Mexico City where she found not only her passion but self-identity.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

The UCLA graduate never saw herself in this position as she was always behind the scenes when it came to design. She studied religious studies in college, which she credits in helping find her interest with cultural motifs she utilizes on her designs. After various digital branding and fashion design gigs, she found a sense of purpose with these denim jackets.

“I was always interested in religious symbols and iconography, that’s why I incorporate that so much into my designs,” Patty says. “Sometimes I get people that tell me ‘Oh my god, you’re selling religion!’ but I say I’m not selling religion. I’m selling reminders of identity and nostalgia,” Delgado says.

Delgado adds: “I feel that we are owners of our images and these are just reminders of our heritage and culture.”

She hopes to inspire the next generation of Latinx designers and creators.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I come from a family of entrepreneurs and they’ve been so proud of the way I’ve been able to make a name for myself through social media.” Delgado says. “So I say give yourself the opportunity to take a risk, People will be really surprised to see what happens when they stop listening to that place of doubt in their heads and put it in silent mode.”


READ: This Fashion Designer Is Turning San Marcos Blankets Into Stunning Streetwear

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This Oaxacan Artist Is Turning Sneakers Into Her Canvas For Día De Muertos And The Results Are Incredible

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This Oaxacan Artist Is Turning Sneakers Into Her Canvas For Día De Muertos And The Results Are Incredible

dorisarellano_pintora / Instagram

As the Coronavirus pandemic has brought to a halt economies and countries around the world, it’s also helped shutter the businesses of artists who rely on galleries and street markets to sell their creations.

Mexico is one of the world’s hardest hit countries and artists in the country have had to get creative to find new clients and customers amid a global pandemic.

However, with the rising popularity of bespoke sneaker collections, one Oaxacan artist seems to have found the winning formula.

A Oaxacan artist has made sneakers her canvas and she’s highlighting her culture in this new medium.

Credit: dorisarellano_pintora / Instagram

Mexico has been one of the world’s hardest hit countries by the Covid-19 pandemic. Coronavirus-related restrictions have indefinitely closed millions of businesses across the country as tourists stopped coming to the country.

As these restrictions have impacted the livelihoods of millions of Mexicans, many have been forced to get creative. For one artist from Oaxaca, Doris Arellano Manzo, the choice was clear: a canvas is a canvas — it could be stretched over a wooden frame or stretched over a pair of athletic shoes.

Like other artists worldwide who are succeeding at beating the pandemic’s economic challenges to their careers, Arellano is learning to adapt — to be less conventional and to think quite literally a bit smaller: she now paints her art on sneakers.

Thanks to the pandemic, Arellano felt she needed to reinvent herself and her craft.

It all started in July when Arellano and her daughter Frida – a communications and social media professional, realized that Arellano needed to think outside the traditional. It was obvious that museums and galleries would likely remain closed for sometime, so how else could they bring her art to her clients?

“Since I love to paint, I can paint for you on a large canvas just as well as I can on a small one,” she recently told the newspaper Milenio. “As far as I’m concerned, while you have me here with my paints and paintbrushes, I’m thrilled.”

Each pair of shoes is unique, she said, “because it’s all done by hand, not by machine.” She describes her style as “traditionalist contemporary,” and says she is drawn to evoking the rites and customs of Oaxacan traditional culture.

Her Día de Muertos collection is garnering international attention.

Credit: dorisarellano_pintora / Instagram

Arellano’s latest collection features shoes with colorful abstract designs in bright cempasúchil orange, with lush floral wreaths and, of course, featuring the iconic Día de Muertos Catrina.

The collection was timed perfectly since so many are looking for non-traditional art amidst a very non-traditional year.

Her latest collection of work, all painted on athletic footwear, is entitled after the celebration she’s commemorating, Día de Muertos.

She says her collections are an homage to traditional Oaxacan festivities that couldn’t take place in 2020.

Credit: dorisarellano_pintora / Instagram

In addition to her recently released Día de Muertos collection which has been very popular, Arellano has created art with other Oaxacan themes.

In fact, when she first began her art-themed sneaker collection in July, at Friday’s suggestion, her sneaker art was based on the enormous festival of Guelaguetza. The Guelaguetza is a traditional Oaxaca cultural festival that had to be canceled this year due to the pandemic.

In some ways, she said, the enforced isolation of the pandemic has been a huge challenge for artists like herself, but in other ways, it’s actually been familiar.

“The work of an artist is a bit enclosed,” she admitted. “We go out when there are exhibits, when we have to go introduce ourselves in public or do interviews.”

Still, she said, the pandemic caught the art community flatfooted.

“Artists don’t have a way to show their work during the pandemic,” she said. “It’s all been halted, and we have to go back and look for new formats for the public to see what we are doing.”

It seems like 2020 has been the year of handcrafted sneaker lines.

Although Arellano is working hard to infuse her own culture into her art and her new sneaker line, she isn’t the first to do so. Just this year Nike released its take on the traditional holiday with a Día de Muertos-themed sneaker collection that had fans of both the holiday and the sneaker company excited for.

Then we got news that Bad Bunny was releasing a custom Crocs line – which flew off the shelves and are now selling for more than four times the original retail price. Plus, recent rumors say that Bad Bunny will also be launching an Adidas collaboration at some point in early 2021.

People have long been obsessed with bespoke sneaker collections, but thanks to the pandemic people are looking for new ways to support artists and satisfy their shopping cravings. We can’t think of a better way than by supporting local Indigenous artists like Arellano.

You can get more information here.

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Community Rallies Around Latina Leader Who Needed A Double Lung Transplant Because Of Covid

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Community Rallies Around Latina Leader Who Needed A Double Lung Transplant Because Of Covid

GoFundMe

There is still so much that we do not know about Covid-19. One of the biggest mysteries is the long term effect of the virus after people recover. One of the most common things caused by Covid is the need for lung transplants. A Latina leader in Milwaukee experienced just that.

Carmen Lerma is a beloved member of the Latino community of Milwaukee.

Lerma was diagnosed with Covid-19 in July. At the time, cases were growing across the country and we knew even less about the virus than we know now. Lerma’s Covid diagnosis led to the beloved community member needing a double lung transplant because of the viciousness of this virus.

“She is very kind. She is very loved,” fellow volunteer and friend Carmen Hernandez said of Lerma to NBC News. “I feel so bad for her situation right now. She can’t even breathe. It’s really hard for me to see her going through this when she’s such an active person.”

Months after her diagnosis, Lerma has a new pair of lungs.

Credit: Carmen Lerma / Facebook

The Covid-19 pandemic is entering a new and terrifying chapter as cases are growing around the world. Countries in Europe are implementing new restrictions to control the spread of Covid and certain states are follow suit to protect residents. Lerma is hoping that her story can help to convince people of the severity of the virus.

Lerma’s story highlights the seriousness of Covid-19 complications after surviving a diagnosis.

Lung transplants for Covid-19 patients are becoming more and more common as more people are infected with the virus. Currently, more than 8 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with Covid. More than 220,000 people have died and cases, which never significantly decreased, are on the rise again in most states.

Lerma is using her story to get people to care about Covid-19.

Credit: Carmen Lerma / Facebook

There has been a lot of misinformation spread about Covid that has contributed to the spikes. President Donald Trump used his own diagnosis to tell people not to worry about the virus and to get out there and live life, something health experts around the world rebuked. Even Harvard University released a study debunking the claim that certain blood types are more resistant or prone to Covid-19.

In one of the most American traditions, friends set up a GoFundMe to help cover the costs of Lerma’s medical care.

The GoFundMe page has raised more than $30,000 of the $100,000 they are hoping to raise to pay for Lerma’s medical costs. She spent months in hospitals fighting the virus that is currently devastating Wisconsin as it spreads unimpeded. Wisconsin is facing one of the worst outbreaks in the U.S. right now after a conservative judge declared Gov. Tony Evers’ restrictions to slow the spread. The state’s Republican Party is suing to reverse the mask mandate, the single strongest tool we have to battle the virus and save lives.

READ: Joe Biden Walks Away With Final Presidential Debate On Healthcare, Covid, And Many Issues

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