Culture

Frida Kahlo’s Casa Azul Is Celebrating Her 113th Birthday With A Week Full Of Digital Events

Happy Birthday Frida! Were the iconic Mexican artist alive today, she would be celebrating her 113th birthday. Few artists have captured the imagination of the world as Frida Kahlo did – both in life and in death.

The iconic Mexican artist lived a unique life full of success and heartache, which has truly helped create a strong fan base around the world. These days, Frida is still hailed as a feminist, LGBTQ+, and Chicano icon, the beloved artist continues to live on in the hearts of those who love her.

Frida Kahlo’s 113th birthday is full of free events that will help you remember her iconic legacy.

People in Mexico and around the world have shown an enormous interest in learning about the life and work of Frida Kahlo – the iconic Mexican artist. People are eager to learn more about the house where she lived, and which today is the Casa Azul; hear about her diary and how she painted despite her health problems, and learn more about her marriage to the muralist Diego Rivera and their unique relationship.

Well, if Frida Kahlo is also one of your favorite artists – you’re in luck! Her former home, the Casa Azul, has prepared a calendar of events and special activities that you’ll be able to attend from the comfort and safety of your own home.

The events will run from July 6-16 and thousands have already logged on to enjoy workshops, readings, and concerts – all free and online. Through the museum’s Facebook and YouTube profiles, this party can be closely followed along with acts by the Mexican tenor Benito Rodríguez, the soprano Olivia Gorra, the flute player Horacio Franco, the Pasatono orchestra and the Opera Studio Beckmann.

Frida’s Casa Azul will be hosting the events, where she called home for much of her life.

Credit: thatgaygringo / Instagram

Frida Kahlo was born Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo Calderón on July 6, 1907 and died on July 13, 1954. She spent much of her life at Casa Azul, in Mexico City’s Coyoacán neighborhood, so it’s no surprise that the museum has decided to celebrate the big day. In fact, it’s between those walls she was born and died.

Obviously, with the continued threat of Covid-19, the museum has decided to host all events online. In an interview with Milenio, museum director Hilda Trujillo said “Culture and art are an indispensable part of the life of society, as has been demonstrated during the Coronavirus pandemic. For this reason, we designed the program ‘Go for Frida!’ in which the Frida Kahlo Museum goes online to request the support of society, so that they can support us with donations to continue creating content for the whole world and continue to highlight Mexico’s art and culture.”

The series of events started on July 6 but will run through July 16 – here’s all the details you need to know about.

Credit: Casa Azul

The program kicked off on July 6 (Frida’s actual birthday) with a concert streamed on the museum’s YouTube channel. But over the ten-day period, the museum will also host various workshops, a reading of Frida Kahlo’s personal diaries, and a drawing contest.

Along with these activities, Casa Azul launched an online donation campaign. This is to help the cultural institution, which closed its doors on March 21 because of the Coronavirus and isn’t expected to reopen until September.

And don’t forget: the Frida Kahlo Museum also has a virtual tour. You can even view the museum’s collection through Google Arts & Culture. So you have no excuses to not celebrate Frida Kahlo birthday and rediscover her legacy.

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Shocked Workers Find A ‘Giant Rat’ Inside Mexico City’s Sewer System

Things That Matter

Shocked Workers Find A ‘Giant Rat’ Inside Mexico City’s Sewer System

@NataliedeRosas / Twitter

The year 2020 seems to be the year that just won’t stop throwing us curve balls. In its latest attempt to shock and terrorize us, workers in Mexico City’s sewer system have found what appears to be a giant rat inside the system. The photos and video are straight out of a horror film.

Some on social media quickly wondered if this wasn’t an actual Master Splinter of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles fame. But it turns out that the ‘giant rat’ has a far more normal origin story.

Images of a ‘giant rat’ from Mexico City’s sewer system quickly went viral on social media.

In what many are calling another sign of the apocalypse brought to us by the year 2020, Mexico City cleanup crews discovered what looked like a monster drowned rat while dredging the sewers. The giant-size “rodent” was part of 22 tons of litter the workers had removed from the city’s drainage tunnels following heavy rains, according to the Border Report.

During the cleanup process, the workers reportedly turned a corner and encountered what they described as a “giant rat,” which sat hunched over and sported incredibly realistic fur. As it turns out, the ’giant rat’ was actually a Halloween prop that had been washed out of its warehouse by the storm. The decoration somehow ended up in the labyrinthine network of sewer tunnels, where it sat undiscovered for years — until now.

Apparently, the ‘giant rat’ was a homemade Halloween decoration that went missing after a rainstorm.

Since the ‘rodents’ discovery, a woman named Evelin López has come forward to claim the rat, which she reportedly created from scratch for Halloween. Lopez said it had gone missing “years ago” during a torrential downpour, and no one could help her retrieve it.

Fortunately, the monster rat appears to be in safe hands — as a now-viral video shows it being hosed off on the street by sewer workers after being rescued from its subterranean lair. Witnesses told El universal that they marveled at the “beast’s” naturalistic appearance, and as can be expected many admitted that they’d of gone running in fear if they had seen it on the street.

The rat’s rightful owner said she has no idea what to do with her “Princess Bride”-evoking prop. Social-media pundits suggest recycling the beast for this year’s Halloween festivities — provided they hose it off a few more times first.

Unfortunately, the rat was discovered only because crews cleaned up debris after a woman drowned following torrential rains.

The ‘giant rat’ / Halloween prop was discovered to have caused a flood which drowned a 54-year-old woman trapped inside her apartment. The woman that died was named in local media reports as Doña Mari. She was 54 and drowned in her home after the water flooded into her residence.

The water caused furniture to move and block the door trapping her inside and drowning her. Her body was discovered by a neighbor, who went looking for her after realizing she wasn’t with other residents who had congregated outside after leaving their homes due to the flooding.

Authorities cleaned the drainage system in the area in hopes of reducing the flooding, and that is when they found the giant fake rat.

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Peeing On Escalators: The Curiously Gross Case Of Mexico City’s Subway System

Culture

Peeing On Escalators: The Curiously Gross Case Of Mexico City’s Subway System

ThatGayGringo / Instagram

Mexico City subway users often complain about malfunctioning escalators that keep breaking down continually. In any given CDMX metro station, you’ll find that escalators are out of order more often than they are functioning. And city officials have offered an explanation that shocked no one—people are peeing on them so much that escalators are corroding. Yup, you read that right.

Of the system’s 467 escalators, 22 are out of service on any given day.

Travelers on the Mexico City subway system often blame authorities for broken-down escalators at subway stops, but Metro officials have another explanation. Somehow, urine is penetrating and corroding the drive wheels and mechanisms of the escalators that carry riders up from underground stations.

One-quarter of escalator breakdowns on the Mexico City Metro are caused by people urinating on them, according to authorities.

The deputy manager of mechanical installations, Fermín Rafael Ramírez Alonso, said that Tacubaya and Chabacano are among the most affected stations.

Maybe—just maybe— stop peeing on escalators?

Ramírez urged users not to urinate on escalators or other Metro installations, because of the damage it causes. “When we open up escalators for maintenance, there is always urine,” Ramírez said.

But another issue is that there are no public bathroom facilities available.

Most stations have no public bathroom facilities, a fact Twitter users were quick to point out, noting there are not even any pay toilets. “More than this being an issue about ethics or manners, I think that this is happening because of a lack of free and accesible bathrooms in the city,” tweeted one user.

Ramirez also said that other causes for breakdowns include excessively heavy loads, running on the stairs, imbalance on the stairs and objects falling between them.

“There are even users who cut the stairs with knives or other sharp objects, of which we have examples in Tacubaya,” he said, surprising absolutely not one of Mexico City’s users. Many metro users know that vendors even sell knives on subway carriages, as was noted by this tweet.

The biggest problem, subway authorities admit, is that many escalators are old, or have been damaged by rough use.

The city plans to replace about 55 escalators over the next two years. With over 1.6bn rides per year, the Mexico City subway is considered the eighth largest in the world by some measures, and one of the cheapest: a 25¢ ticket will get you a single ride to any destination on the 140-mile (226km) system. Just remember to use the bathroom before setting out.

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