culture

This Dominican Immigrant Teen Just Got Into Harvard On His Own Merit

@EmilioTheLion / Twitter

The recent college admissions scandal has highlighted the fact that many of the rich and famous are gaming a system already favoring them. Children of the rich are facing growing scrutiny after the world learned schools were bribed to accept certain students. Meanwhile, the story is shedding light on students of color getting into exceptional colleges on their merit while overcoming incredible obstacles. Emilio De Leon is one student showing the world what students of color are capable of doing.

Meet Emilio De Leon, a Dominican immigrant that just got accepted into Harvard.

De Leon, a senior at a Florida high school, posted his amazing achievement on social media and it currently has more than 150,000 likes.

“Not bad for an immigrant kid who used to shower outside #harvard2023!” De Leon wrote on Twitter. The tweet included a picture of him, his mom holding the flag of the Dominican Republic, and a cute picture of him showering outside.

If you’re wondering what it means to be accepted into Harvard, please consider the following: Out of more than 40,000 people that apply to attend, only a little more than 2,000 get accepted — according to last year’s report.

Furthermore, Latinos are a minority at Harvard. According to a report from 2016, the student population, both undergraduate and graduate, is 42.4 percent white, 13.5 percent Asian, 8.04 percent Latino, 5.28 percent Black, 3.77 percent mixed race, 0.22 percent American Indian or Alaska Native, and 0.1 percent Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islanders. A majority of the population, including race and gender, are white males.

Here’s how social media is taking this wonderful news.

We may not know De Leon personally, but we were crying buckets. There is something so inspiring about watching someone from such humble beginnings reach such heights.

He’s already getting attention from his Harvard classmates.

We know what it is like to find people like yourself in certain settings and how great that feels. There is something so amazing and comforting about getting connected with people who understand your culture. How many of us have sought out other Latinos in our spaces to connect with?

So when is he going to be on the “Desus & Mero” show?

Juan Ayala — a/k/a Platano Man or the subway Superman as we’d like to call him — is asking and is giving him props too. We would love to see De Leon interviewed about his experience getting to Harvard and even some insight to his first couple of days.

He even got a nice welcome from his new university.

So very cool! Keep us updated, Emilio, and congratulations. You clearly put in the work and deserve it. Harvard ain’t ready for the kind of magic and hard work a Latino will bring after striving for the best in life. We are rooting for you!

READ: How One Latina’s App Is Helping Undocumented Students Find Ways To Pay For College

Paid Promoted Stories

Scientists Want To Save The Monarch Butterfly From Extinction By Moving A Forest Because Of Climate Change

culture

Scientists Want To Save The Monarch Butterfly From Extinction By Moving A Forest Because Of Climate Change

Every winter countless tourists head on over to Piedra Herrada Sanctuary in Mexico to witness a breathtaking experience that doesn’t happen anywhere else. They are there to see the migration of the monarch butterfly that is a remarkable part of life itself. Seeing these little creatures fly around Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve is a once in a lifetime opportunity, and soon it could be gone forever.

Environmentalists fear that because of climate change and other factors, the monarch butterfly could become extinct.

Instagram/@mucun0332

The butterflies’ 3,000-mile migration begins in November in Mexico. The butterflies make their way north through the U.S. and then to Canada in mid-March. Between the fall and winter season is when they return to Mexico once again for their yearly trip bringing with them a spectacular scene.

“In the early days, we didn’t know where they came from,” 75-year-old Francisco Ramirez Cruz told the Los Angeles Times. Cruz has lived near the reserve and has experienced the migration since he was a little boy. “But we have always been so happy to see them.”

He said there’s a variety of reasons why the monarch butterfly migration may soon come to an end. According to the Los Angeles Times, he said the monarch population is dwindling quickly due to “logging, herbicides and other human activities destroying natural habitats.” However, the most significant factor is climate change. The butterflies make their way to this particular forest, but if climate change brings drought, warm weather, and severe storms, the woods may lose its oyamel fir trees.

Scientists and researchers are trying to move the entire forest to a higher elevation to save the trees and have a place for the butterflies to come home to.

Instagram/@jderse

According to Scientific American, moving a natural habitat is one they rarely consider because it can be extremely damaging, but they say in the case of oyamel fir trees they are considering it because they have nothing left to lose.

This drastic measure would mean not just moving trees to a higher elevation —  1,000 feet up a mountain — but also plant new trees.

Instagram/@arandomwalkatw

“Researchers were able to shift more than 750 seedlings up a mountainside by up to 400 meters, as long as they planted the young trees under the shade of neighboring bushes,” the Scientific American explains. “This protected the seedlings from sunlight and extreme temperatures.”

Chip Taylor, a retired ecology professor in Kansas and the director of Monarch Watch, told the Los Angeles Times that by planting new trees and relocating the forest, this could give researchers time to figure out their next move.

“What these measures do is give us time to address climate change,” Taylor told the publication. “If we don’t do something eventually about CO2s, eventually the new trees will be pushed off the mountain too.”

READ: AOC Is Pushing Back Against The GOP’s Ignorance On Climate Change And The Dangers It Poses