Things That Matter

Mexico City Taxis Came Full Force To Block Major Streets And Tourist Attractions To Get Ride Sharing Apps Banned

Taxi drivers came out in full force across Mexico City, blocking streets, tourist attractions, and major intersections. They’re protesting what they say is unfair competition from ride-sharing services like Uber, Cabify, and Didi.

They want the apps banned in Mexico.

Their bloqueos of some the city’s most important streets and attractions made news around the world.

Credit: @AFPMexico / Twitter

The taxistas started congregating in the zócalo (the city’s giant public plaza) around 6:30 am, while roadblocks started going up at 10:00 am all around the capital. and were expected to remain until noon. Drivers were even blocking major entry points to the city along highways from Pachuca, Toluca, and Cuernavaca.

Taxis were even suspending services in districts across the city.

The drivers complain that inconsistent regulation creates an uneven playing field for them to compete with ride-sharing, and want more robust regulation of their competitors. One of their biggest complaints is that taxis in Mexico City have to be painted a certain way – white and pink – which can cost up to MXN$2,500 (about $125 USD).

Several drivers said the ride-hailing apps have cost them 40% of their earnings.

According to some estimates, Mexico City is home to the world’s largest taxi fleet.

Credit: @fastpacific / Twitter

With that many cabs out there, it kinda makes sense how they were able to bring the city to a standstill with their demonstration.

Many across the capital were shocked by their tactics.

Credit: @pqblair / Twitter

Drivers would form giant groups of taxis and invade entire districts, intersections, plazas, and major tourist attractions. They succeeded at shocking residents and tourists alike while snarling traffic across the city of more than 20 million people.

At one point, taxi drivers enlisted the help of bus drivers to help block streets.

Credit: @lad_left / Twitter

Now imagine trying to get through the city’s narrow street or already traffic-chocked streets with gangs of taxis and giant buses…

Mexican Twitter was full of opinions on the taxi strike and taxi drivers themselves.

With the strike bringing much of the city to a standstill and the already negative attitudes towards taxistas in the city, many were not happy.

In an all too common sight in Mexico City, videos emerged of taxi gangs attacking Uber drivers.

These attacks on Uber drivers are nothing new. When the ride-sharing app first arrived in Mexico City, it was common for drivers arriving at the airport to be pelted with rocks.

And people are fed up.

Credit: @chromaticexplor / Twitter

Most people on Twitter had the same feelings and thoughts – either evolve with the industry or you’re going to go extinct.

Residents were quick to call out the taxi drivers on social media for the reasons why they’re losing to Uber.

Credit: guruchuier / Twitter

Basically saying that if drivers cleaned their cars, were friendly, and didn’t try to rob you with high fares, they wouldn’t have to worry about competition from Uber.

The memes out on Mexican Twitter in response to all of this were pretty amazing.

Credit: @lapnayh / Twitter

Translation: “It’s not you, it’s your bad service.”

And apparently, the taxi strike happened to fall on World Bike Day…

Credit: @BiciManager / Twitter

Leading many to suggest taking your commute into your own hands while helping the environment – ride a bike!

All of this had many dreaming of a Mexico City without taxis.

And the people were totally here for it.

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