Things That Matter

Regina Romero Won The Democratic Primary In Tucson And Now Has The Chance To Be The City’s First Latina Mayor

Back in 1875, when Arizona was still a territory and not yet a part of the United States, a Mexican businessman made history there. Estevan Ochoa, from Chihuahua, Mexico, became Tucson’s first and only Latino mayor. Now 144 years later, Arizona is poised to make history once again. 

Regina Romero won the Democratic primary election, which means she could possibly become the first Latina mayor of Tucson. 

Credit: @TucsonRomero / Twitter

In a stunning landslide election, Romero beat two white Democratic politicians vying to become mayor of Tucson with 49.5 percent of the votes, NBC News reported.

“Words cannot describe how humbled I am to be the Democratic nominee for Mayor of our beautiful City,” Romero said on Instagram. “Thank you to both Randi Dorman and Steve Farley for your dedication and passion to bringing meaningful change to our community. I am truly grateful for your support and I look forward to working with each of you on how we can continue to progress as a City.” 

Steve Farley, her most significant threat in the Democratic primary, said that despite his loss, the people of Tucson must rally behind Romero. What counts is that a Democrat wins against independent Ed Ackerley in the mayoral election on November 5

“While I’m disappointed in the result, I stand behind the will of the people and support Romero to be our next mayor,” Farley said, according to a local news affiliate. “We should all support Romero, because our new mayor will need ideas and participation from all Tucsonans. This is our city, all of us together.”

The 44-year-old wife and mother of two children, has already made history as first Latina elected to the city council.

Credit: tucsonromero / Instagram

As the youngest in a family of six kids, she was the first person to vote in her family. Her website states that she is the daughter of migrant farmworkers and a graduate of the University of Arizona. 

“I’m running to be the Mayor of Tucson because I believe we all deserve a safe, clean, just, and sustainable city that provides economic opportunity to all working families,” her bio states. “My 11-year track record as a Council Member and a lifetime of advocacy for our community make me the most prepared candidate to lead our City forward.”

Where does she stand on the issues? She’s as Democratic as they come and has done a lot for Tucson already.  

Credit: tucsonromero / Instagram

Romero states that she is “pro-child, pro-environment, pro-education, and pro-choice” and made huge strides as a councilwoman. During her tenure, Romero fought for working-class family and was able to obtain hundreds of high-wage, long-term jobs in the city of Tucson by introducing the city’s 5-year economic recovery plan which helped after the recession. She’s also worked to develop Tucson’s response to climate change an advocated for the permanent protection of open spaces and environmentally sensitive areas, and spearheaded an effort to declare Tucson an “Immigrant Welcome City.”

Romero also established a paid Cesar Chavez holiday to recognize the Labor Movement’s contributions.

Credit: @TucsonRomero / Twitter

As the daughter of migrant workers — her family is originally from Mexico — establishing a paid holiday on Cesar Chavez meant even more. 

Romero has held the responsibility to do as much as she could for her family, and now she’s doing the same for other families. 

“We would talk politics at the dinner table,” Romero said in a 2007 interview. “When I was 17 or 18, my parents said, ‘You have to register to vote because you represent the entire family.'”

Romero has a strong chance of becoming mayor in a couple of months because Tuscon typically votes Democrat, despite Arizona siding more on the Republican side.

 Credit: tucsonromero / Instagram

In the past half-century, the majority of mayors have been Democrat. This mayoral election Romero is going up against an Independent so the chances for that opponent don’t look too good. Now, when it comes to governors, Arizona is more of a red state and currently have a Republican running the show (Doug Ducey). So, it’s really up to the voters and whether they like how President Donald Trump and Ducey are running things. According to local poll numbers, Arizona isn’t feeling Trump all that much. That narrows the scale more on Romero’s side. So we’ll just have to wait and see what happens in Tucson on Nov. 5, but we’re rooting for you, Regina!

READ: 2020 Democratic Candidates Know Latinos Could Tip The Election So They’ve Started Pulling Out All The Stops

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