Fierce

Latinas Raged Outside Of The Supreme Court To Fight Back At Recent Abortion Bans That Are Unconstitutional

After a wave of near-total abortion bans from a staggering eight states in the last few weeks, more than 400 events were planned for a national day of action on Tuesday, and Latinas showed out. A 2018 National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH) survey showed that more than half of Latinas can imagine a situation in which abortion could be the right choice for them or their partner. That’s probably because healthcare access is consistently more difficult for women of color, including much-needed birth control to prevent abortions. According to NLIRH, four in ten Latino voters under age 45 have gone without birth control they wanted in the last two years because of access issues.

The research is there. The bans will most significantly impact impoverished communities and women of color. Here’s how Latinas showed up to protest the wave of abortion restrictions that are setting women’s health rights back.

More than 400 protesters appeared outside the Supreme Court on a Tuesday in anger.

@ACLU / Twitter

Since President Trump appointed two conservative justices to SCOTUS, anti-abortion activists are seeing a clearer path to overturning Roe v. Wade. Alabama is the most extreme with a total ban on abortion after six weeks before most women know they are pregnant, with no exception for rape and incest.

Abortion rights activists are once again sharing their personal stories to the public, in hopes to rally allies.

The threat to abortion access is causing women across the country to share their own abortion stories. For years, women were dying in the U.S. as they sought out dangerous abortions because of restrictions on the medical procedure. Now, women are fearful that we are going back to a time where women will die again trying to access abortions.

Four states passed laws that ban abortion after a detected heartbeat–something that happens before most women even know they’re pregnant.

@ACLU / Twitter

For marginalized women and non-binary folks, the ability to detect a missed period, take off work, for both the abortion and transportation to a clinic are nearly insurmountable in such a short amount of time. Many argue that these laws are effectively total abortion bans, which Roe V Wade deemed unconstitutional. This is disproportionately going to impact poor women and women of color in greater numbers.

Alabama’s law does not even include exceptions for rape or incest and women are ready to fight back.

@AlinaTelesur / Twitter

“Una de las más de 400 protestas contra la prohibición al aborto se desarrolla en la Corte Suprema de Justicia en Washington DC” @AlinaTelesur tweeted. “‘Mi cuerpo, mis decisiones,’ ‘el aborto es un derecho,’ ‘dejen de prohibir el aborto’ son algunas de las consignas que se corean aquí. #StopTheBans – at Supreme Court of the United States.”

Missouri’s Legislature passed a bill banning abortions at eight weeks, not yet signed by the governor.

@katto_4 / Twitter

“Tell the anti-rights extremists to stop,” @katto_4 tweeted. “For Argentina, Brazil, and the U.S., abortion is a human right. #StopThebans #AbortoLegal @IntlWomen.”

Many of the bans won’t go into effect until January 2020 but the fight has already started.

@NLIRH / Twitter

Organizations like Planned Parenthood, the ACLU and the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH) are fighting to ensure it never goes into effect. It will all come down to a conservative-leaning Supreme Court decision and abortion advocates are nervous at the prospect of the Supreme Court hearing the case.

Abortion access is an immigration issue as well.

@votolatino / Twitter

We’ve seen teenagers and women migrants in detention centers being denied abortions. The migrants, who are fleeing sexual violence and are often carrying the product of rape, have been barred, and in some cases, almost forced to carry the fetus to term.

Abortion is gearing up to become a key issue for 2020 elections.

@gescol / Twitter

Georgia is adding punishment for women who miscarry or leave the state for an abortion. We have seen real-world examples of the damage these Draconian penalties have on women. Women in El Salvador could faces decades in jail for a miscarriage, which is an unfortunate and traumatic side effect of some abortions.

The women who showed up yesterday are fighting to ensure it stays that way.

@NLIRH / Twitter

Abortion rights activists want to ensure that they see and hear from their representatives on where they stand. This divisive issue, which has left many Republicans in a moderate to conservative stance, may change as voters continue to place pressure. We saw what pressure on healthcare did to protect Americans’ right access to affordable healthcare.

For now, the poderosas fighting for abortion rights are making their voices heard.

@gmg_az / Twitter

Holding your government accountable and fighting for what you think is right and what the government should do is what being patriotic is all about.

Regardless where you stand, they’re sharing their intimate stories on a stigmatized issue.

@VotoLatino / Twitter

These gente are laying it all out on the line to ensure the media and the public speak up on this issue, and to ensure democracy reigns. Gracias.

READ: #YouKnowMe Is The Viral Hashtag Latinas Are Using To Tell Their Freeing Abortion Stories After Alabama Lawmakers Passed One Of The Most Extreme Abortion Bans In The Country

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