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Mexico Grants Bolivia’s Former President Asylum Allowing Him To Flee Growing Unrest

Latin America is in chaos. People are protesting in Chile over the economic disparity between classes. Colombians are also fighting for their demand for a fair educational system. Mexico’s violence is surging once again after Mexico’s new government has taken over. The Amazon rainforest is still on fire, and Brazil’s president refuses to acknowledge the environmental ramifications. Nicolas Maduro, Venezuela’s president, is still in office despite his people demanding otherwise. Now we can add Bolivia to that list

On Monday, Evo Morales resigned as president of Bolivia after the public renounced the presidential elections there in October. 

Credit: @ajplus / Twitter

Back in October, Morales ran against former President Carlos Mesa (he was president of Bolivia between 2003 and 2005). Morales had been Bolivia’s leader since 2006, but it looks as if perhaps the people had enough of his presidency. During the elections last month, CNN reports that Morales won by a small margin

So a recount was in order. However, 24 hours after the counting had begun, Morales ordered to end it and declared himself president. The fact that Morales said he had won himself wasn’t that farfetched, because he sort of did that in the past. 

Jim Shultz, Founder and Executive Director of the Democracy Center, who’s lived in Bolivia and understands the situation there, wrote, “One was what seemed like Morales’ desire to serve as President for Life. When his political party, MAS, wrote a new constitution in 2009, they lifted the long-standing one-term limit on presidents and paved the way for Evo to run for a second term. In 2014 he broke a long-standing pledge not to seek a third term, claiming that his first term didn’t count because it was served under the old constitution. He won once more.”

The election results, and Morales handling of it, resulted in massive protests and violence. 

Credit: @evagolinger / Twitter

“Bolivians are upset over fraud, and we will not be silent in the face of injustice,” 26-year-old Diego Tamayo, a student at a university, told the New York Times. “Never in my life have I seen a mobilization of this scale.”

The mobilization seemed to work. Bolivian Armed Forces, Commander Williams Kaliman, told Morales to step down, and he did. 

Morales tweeted, “I denounce to the world and the Bolivian people that a police officer publicly announced that he is instructed to execute an illegal arrest warrant against me; likewise, violent groups assaulted my home. A coup destroys the rule of law.” He added, “After looting and trying to set fire to my house in Villa Victoria, vandalism groups of the Mesa and Camacho coup docked my home in the Magisterio neighborhood of Cochabamba. I am very grateful to my neighbors, who stopped those raids. A coup destroys peace.”

Now Mexico has opened the doors to the former leader where he has sought asylum. 

He said this is where he spent his first night as the former president of Bolivia. 

Credit: @evoespueblo / Twitter

“This was my first night after leaving the presidency, forced by the coup of Mesa and Camacho with the help of the Police. There I remembered my times as a leader. Very grateful to my brothers from the federations of the Tropic of Cochabamba for providing security and care.”

Now that he is in the hands of the Mexican government, Morales doesn’t seem all that upset about getting ousted.

Credit: @evoespueblo / Twitter

Morales tweeted, “Very grateful to brother Manuel López Obrador and the government and people of Mexico for saving my life. We arrived safe and sound with our brothers Álvaro and Gabriela. The coup plotters offered $ 50,000 to a security member to deliver me before my resignation.” 

Wow, sounds kind of dramatic, almost like it could be a movie or series on TV. Weirdly enough, the Bolivia drama sounds just like season two of “Jack Ryan.” We won’t spoil it for you if you haven’t seen it. Just know that it’s about a Venezuelan president that will go to great lengths to not lose his presidency. It sounds like real life to us. Speaking of Venezuelan president, Maduro was not pleased at all about Morales getting ousted. He also blamed President Donald Trump. 

“There went Donald Trump to applaud and celebrate what he thinks is his victory … the look on Donald Trump’s face was one of vengeance, of hatred, and he gave the order to overthrow and finish off the Indian,” Maduro said, according to Asi Somos

But now the real work begins. Who will lead Bolivia now?

READ: Bolivia’s President Wants To Be Reelected For A Fourth Time But He Could Send His Country Into A Political Crisis

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