Things That Matter

Millennials Are Replacing Engagement Rings With Diamonds Pierced Into Their Fingers

The centuries-old tradition of proposing with an engagement ring is facing a new challenger. Because if Instagram is anything to go by, engagement finger piercings are now a thing. Yup, some people are now choosing to declare their eternal love for each other with a diamond piercing instead of an actual ring. Here’s how it works.

Dermal piercings are the latest trend replacing engagement rings.

Getting your ears pierced (probably in the window of Claires, with your friends surrounding you) is a rite of passage for most 13-year-olds. But this isn’t that kind of piercing. It’s called a dermal piercing or (to those in the medical profession) a transdermal implant. It’s hardcore and when done right can look pretty cool.

Also known as microdermals, anchors, dermal anchors, and single-point piercings.

They refer to any piercing that lies on a flat surface of the body – in this case, the finger – and is held in place with an ‘anchor’ that is implanted beneath the skin. Ouch. The jewelry then sits on the surface of the skin, making it look like there are gems or beads on the body.

How Does a Dermal Piercing Work?

PSA to all weak-stomached readers: skip this paragraph. First, a qualified technician will sterilize the area and then use either a dermal punch on to remove a small tube of flesh, or a needle to make an L-shaped pouch, then, using dermal forceps, an anchor with either a footed or round base is inserted into the area.

How long does a dermal piercing last?

While you might not get a choice about what type of dermal base is used, there are several variations. Some are punctured with holes so that the tissue can grow in and around the piercing while others have pivoting feet that keep the piercing in place over time – FYI this is V. important as these little accessories have a habit of migrating and rejecting over time (if this happens to you speak to your piercer STAT as a displaced piercing can be fixed as long as you act fast!).

So why are people opting for piercings?

One reason might be cost: tAccording to recent surveys, most American couples expect to spend between $1,000 and $5,000 on an engagement ring, while dermals come in at around $70.

But there are lots of potential complications.

A dermatological expert told the BBC, “If the piercing is not deep enough there is a risk of it moving, known as migration. If it is too deep the skin begins to grow over the piercing, known as embedding. Other risks include inflammation, scarring and infection – particularly if it is on the hands, as is the case with these particular piercings.” They also point out that, “Another problem with having a dermal piercing on your hand is the increased likelihood of it catching on something.”

… Let’s just take a second for that to sink in.

If the mere thought of your ring piercing catching on your clothes or hair isn’t enough to put you off, some piercing studios have said they won’t do dermal piercings on people’s fingers, for that very reason. So if you’re thinking of getting a finger piercing, keep in mind that it will hurt, it could migrate, embed itself, or get infected, and you may accidentally rip your finger skin off while putting on a sweater —all in the name of love. You have been warned.

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