Things That Matter

The Internet Is Freaking Out Over This Optical Illusion And People Can’t Decide If they See A Bird Or A Bunny

The latest optical illusion phenomenon has everyone on social media wondering whether a viral video showing an animal having its head stroked is a bird or whether it’s a bunny. 

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s Bad Bunny… err, I mean, it’s a bunny! Watch for yourself and tell us what you think. 

Now, the internet is as divided as it was when #TheDress got our attention back in 2015, when everyone was figuring out whether the dress was blue or gold. or remember last year when everyone was wondering whether a video was saying Yanny or Laurel in a viral audio clip? Even though we already know how many of these optical illusions come to be, we’re still caught by surprise and get sucked right into it. 

Last week a biological psychiatry researcher at the University of Oslo in Norway posted a video on Twitter that showed an animal being rubbed on the head. It quickly went viral and people went nuts. In the tweet Daniel Quintana wrote, “Rabbits love getting stroked on their nose.” 

It’s safe to say people were super confused. I mean, doesn’t that look like a sleek beak? 

The world is officially canceled now. I’m done. I can’t.

Many people were seeing a bird, or a raven to be more specific. And for a second, we were right there with them. 

Those don’t look like bunny ears, it looks more like a beak… 

Then people started saying it was a duck! Come on people, make up your mind.

However, we think this woman’s daughter is on to something. She said it’s a puppy. She’s gotta be right, right? 

But look closely and pay attention to the ears… then look even closer to the animal’s eyes and you start to see the whole picture. 

The researcher then went on to give us more information about the video and tweeted that he hadn’t taken that footage but instead simply shared it from an @Imgur tweetAccording to Quintana, who spoke with CNET about the viral tweet he shared, “the static bird/rabbit illusion is well-known within psychology and philosophy, so when I saw a video, I thought it would be interesting to share it.” 

Quintana also said that unlike the rest of the internet, he was never fooled by the bird or bunny dilemma. Well, good for you dude — but you can’t judge a bird by it’s beak (or however the saying goes!). 

So he definitely knew what he was doing when he shared that video. He knew he’d send the rest of Twitter down a rabbit hole. 

“I thought it was fairly clear that the video was of a bird… as you can see the translucent nictitating membrane sweep across the eye horizontally (rabbits don’t have membranes like that and the positioning of the ‘ears’ are a little strange,” he told CNET.

Okay, fair. Totally. But how are we supposed to know that? It doesn’t sound like common knowledge tbh. 

After people began catching on to the truth and realizing that this in fact was a bunny, people on Twitter began replying to his thread with photos of their bunny making jokes about what animal it could be instead.

LOL, on Twitter user showed us their grey unicorn. The resemblance is uncanny! 

Another user tweeted “that shark seems to enjoy some scratches behind its gills.”

As you can tell, people started to straight out troll. 

The whole bird or bunny dilemma even had people twisting and turning their phone to uncover the truth.

“First I thought it was a bird, then I thought it was a rabbit, then I had to put the phone against my eye to realize “oh snip snap scallywaps, that’s a cat,” one Twitter user said. 

All jokes aside, we hope you realize by now that the animal in question was in fact a bunny.

“I’m surprised to see how popular the tweet has been,” Quintana told CNET. “I only expected that psychological scientists would be interested, but it’s gone much further than my community. It seems about two-thirds of people are insisting it’s a bird, and the remainder are either insisting it’s a rabbit or can’t decide.”

It’s the internet we’re talking about, you’re going to have a lot more people than psychological scientists interested in anything that has to do with optical illusions. After all, why else do we log onto Twitter if it’s not for some good ‘ol laughs and debates? 

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