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A GOP Candidate For Senate Just Suggested Annexing All Of Mexico And Apparently He Isn’t Joking

Immigration from Central America and Mexico continues to be a hot topic among both the public and politicians. While some still rally for the closing of deadly and inhuman migration centers along the Southern U.S. border, others feed into anti-immigrant sentiment and the far-right’s so-called solutions to migration. Though unimpressive and expensive, Trump’s border wall is also still a favorite among conservative supporters. Still, other ideas are being shared to “fix” the issue with migration — and this latest one is pretty laughable. 

A GOP candidate for Arizona’s Senate race recently suggested annexing Mexico (yes, the whole country) into the United States in order to bypass issues of Southern migration. 

Twitter / @Newsweek

Daniel McCarthy is a cosmetic company executive from Glendale, Arizona who announced his candidacy for the Arizona state Senate in August. Running against incumbent Senator Martha McSally for the Republican primary, the new politician has called for a return to “authenticity and integrity.” One of his biggest platform points is solving the immigration problem. 

While making his rounds to raise support for his campaign, McCarthy stopped by iHeartRadio for an interview with host Garret Lewis. That’s where he shared his outrageous solution for the Mexico-United States border conflict. While proposing his idea that Mexico be annexed into the U.S., McCarthy suggested that the U.S. could benefit from some new “beachfront property” after the acquisition. 

“There is a process to become states for the United States,” McCarthy explained, citing the Constitution’s requirements for admitting new states. “Clearly 30 million Mexican illegal immigrants want to be United States citizens, probably half the country wants to be United States citizens. There’s a reason they’re coming here.”

Though he still supports Trump’s border wall, McCarthy appealed to Mexican citizens with his suggestion of incorporating Mexico as a state. 

Twitter / @OficialEnLaMira

McCarthy cited what he suggested were unsavory living conditions for all of the Mexican people. 

“They live in hell,” he expressed. “Their government is corrupt. The cartels are destroying these peoples’ lives. Personally, I think the power brokers in D.C. don’t want the American people to start thinking about how easily useless politicians can be removed.”

With these grievances in mind, he prompted the people of Mexico to “rise up” and fight for statehood.

“I want to speak above the Mexican government,” the Republican candidate stated. “When you’re talking to the Mexican citizens, ‘Rise up in your communities and petition to become states for the United States.’ That’s how that process works. By the way, it’s not that challenging.”

As unfounded as McCarthy’s plan is, it also ignores the main source of current migration at the Southern border. 

Twitter /@PeriodismoHoyMX

Though migrants are attempting to enter the U.S. from the Mexican border, the majority of those detained are from Central America. According to DHS Office of Inspector General statistics that were released earlier this year, the majority of migrants seeking asylum at the Southern border are from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. 

These countries experience a high level of crime and violence along with having a population stricken by poverty. In Guatemala, 60% of the population live below the poverty line while contending with a corrupt and ineffective national government. Honduras is worse off with 65% of its population living in abject poverty. It’s from this poverty and violence that these migrants flee. Annexing Mexico wouldn’t solve their problems as they are not Mexican citizens. 

For the most part, the reaction to McCarty’s suggestion has been to ridicule it as an outrageous idea. Since then, the Republican candidate has slightly walked back his proposal and called it “kind of a joke.”

This annexation plan wasn’t the only bit of ridiculousness to come from McCarthy recently.

Twitter / @PhilipWegmann

On Monday, the first time candidate posted a comment on a Facebook group for Republicans that is drawing a lot of criticism. In response to doubt about his fitness as a candidate, McCarthy wrote, “I am qualified for the job. Jesus was 33 when he saved the world.” 

McCarthy later did an interview with “The Arizona Republic” and attempted to defend the comparison. According to the 34 year-old candidate, the Facebook group had negatively brought up his age before and the comment was made to explain how age shouldn’t be a factor in the race. 

“I would never compare myself to Jesus,” McCarthy said in the interview. “I would never even come close to comparing myself to Jesus Christ. I made reference to his age when he was crucified.”

Later the same day, he tweeted out another comparison of himself to Jesus. “Show me the lie,” the since deleted Tweet read. “They also hated Jesus because He spoke the truth.”

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