Things That Matter

‘Pachamama’ Is The Peruvian-Inspired Movie Showing The Parallels Between Colonizers And Institutions Destroying Earth

Writer-Director Juan Antin’s latest film “Pachamama”, god willing, might just save the planet. The Argentinian director’s latest project illustrates a story of a young boy from the Andes growing up during the time the Incas were colonized by Spain. Even more importantly, as a piece of content that targets younger generations, it strikes up a conversation on how the actions of early colonizers mirror the ways in which we mistreat our planet today.

“Pachamama” weaves a tale about colonialism and how it set the destruction of our planet in motion.

Netflix

“Pachamama” follows a 10-year-old boy from a remote village in the Andes Mountains who dreams of being a shaman. After an Incan overlord takes a small golden statue from their village, the boy embarks on an adventure with his friend and her pet llama to retrieve it. The film’s title, “Pachamama,” refers to an earth-mother goddess that is worshiped by the indigenous people of the Andes. What’s more, the movie has an ecological element that strongly parallels the issues related to our environment today.

“The idea came one day when I was at a festival in Cuba presenting my first film, ‘Mercano the Martian,’” explains Antin. “I was staring at the sea and I had a vision. I imagined all those ships coming in from Europe and Spain 500 years ago. I said, ‘Wow, I can imagine how the indigenous people saw these men arrive and thought they were gods.’ I started to imagine the different points of view that each one has of the other and thought it would be a good idea for a film.”

Antin says that interacting with indigenous communities was a huge part of his inspiration for the film.

Netflix

During a time in which Antin’s wife, who is an anthropologist, was doing social work for indigenous communities in Argentina, Antin was met with opportunities to speak to community leaders and shamans.

“That’s when I really fell in love with this culture of Pachamama, how they worship the earth. They are in gratitude and in love with the earth and it’s so simple,” he told Variety in a recent interview. “And I thought it’s two points of view of the same thing: Europeans coming from Spain, from Europe, from England, France also, and seeing the earth as a resource of richness and gold, and these people that just see it as something to worship.”

Check out the full clip of the film here.

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