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Every Latino Can Relate To The Fear Of Cascarones While Celebrating One Of The Holiest Days

Even if your parents aren’t that religious, we can all remember our abuelitas coming home from mass to spritz holy water in our faces. My abuela had an entire altar in her spare closet complete with statues of Saints, bowls of holy water and velas going 24/7. It was a fire hazard.

Needless to say, if you grew up Catholic, every day was an opportunity to go to church or thank Dios, but no day was as holy as Easter. From the forty days leading up to it down to the very day, welcome to walk down memory lane:

You spent the entire week leading up to Easter (La Semana Santa) going to church every day.

@JennyAxtell / Twitter

Even if your family hadn’t been to church since last Christmas, this was the week that your family could be cleansed of all their sins. Pray hard this week and it counts double.

When you were a kid, you went to the church basement halfway through mass to be thoroughly creeped out.

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There may be a home video recording of you telling the Easter Bunny que “eres sucio.” Maybe that’s just me, too. 😉

Everyone and their tía came home with one of these Palm crosses.

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As a kid, once they started passing these out at Palm Sunday mass, you knew some yummy dulces were coming your way in just a few days. My abuela would make a dozen of these and pass them out.

You might even tune into EWTN to see El Papa give the holy mass.

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You had to go fetch tissues for your abuela and kneel on your living room floor just like it was the real thing. Tuning in for Semana Santa masses was always a somber occasion.

Even though Good Friday was the one day a year there was no Mass, you still had to go to the neighborhood reenactment.

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Yes, it was always pretty disturbing as a kid. This is why it’s so easy for our mami’s to guilt trip us into doing or wearing anything. The Catholic guilty conscience starts with the Good Friday plays.

If you ever had an Easter egg hunt, it only had rosary beads inside.

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They’d be extra special if your nana made it for you with your name inscribed. Some easter eggs had little vials of holy water or a tiny cross made of olive wood made in Bethlehem.

You may have made cascarones as a kid.

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The best part is after you’ve drained the eggs, dyed them and filled them with confetti. Throwing them at your siblings or papa might have been the most fun part of Easter.

It was the only time you could lay in the grass with your nice clothes.

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It was also that one day of the year you wore the nice dress your mom kept hanging with a garbage bag over it. You wore it every single year until it became too short for church and then your little prima wore it.

And your mom pulled out her chocolate bunny molds.

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Maybe it was just me, but our kitchen would be lined up with plastic molds of eggs, Easter bunnies, and angels that would be filled with melted chocolate. My mom made chocolate pops out of them and it was magical.

It was just extra magical time.

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…that our parents exploited to get us to se portan bien por Dios. Does lying to children count as a sin?

It also meant the whole family came together to go to the beach after Sunday Mass.

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Or Saturday–the actual day of rest from going to Mass that whole week. Usually, though, your schedule revolved around all the prep time our poor moms spent in the kitchen to prepare for Easter.

As adults, Easter means your tía sending this photo to the group text:

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More likely it’s a bloody image of Christ dying for our sins. The guilt trip never ends, my friends.

Like any family event, you can expect someone to ask you when you’re getting married.

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If your family is extra religious, you’ll hear the chismosas gossiping about whether or not you gave your “V card” away. Ya no puedo.

Today, Easter means looking forward to all the tasty grub, like bacaláo.

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Yes, we’ve been eating fish for the last forty days, but some of us celebrated the miracle of Jesus’ baskets of fish one last time for the year with fried codfish.

Others go full lechón to celebrate the end of the meat fast.

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Typically, Catholics will fast from meat, ranging from the entire Lenten season to just Fridays to every day but Sunday. My family went with every day but Sunday. Comment with your family traditions below!

Claro, there’s the Pan de Pascua.

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It’s not just any ordinary fruit cake. It’s only brought out on the holiest occasions, gaining more popularity at Christmas than the traditional Easter holiday.

If you’re like me and my hermanos, adulting means faking it.

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We’ve all tried to assert our spiritual or non-spiritual beliefs and pass on going to Mass, but nobody wants to make their mom cry. Fake it till you make it, they say.

Maybe you still give something up for Lent?

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There’s something to be said for the meaning of tradition. It feels good to do something with your family, even if it’s effectively a group diet. It still means something.

And today, we get to see our sobrinos in the cutest outfits.

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It looks like they’re getting more comfortable with every generation, gracias a Dios. As adults, it’s amazing to go full circle and help make Easter special for the young ones.

And dress our baby hijos in their own Easter Bunny outfits.

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“Que preciosa, mi muñeca linda! Que Dios te bendiga y te quiero mucho, mi amor!”

Tell me you haven’t said this to your dog and prove that we’re not all our parents when it comes to our dogs. ????

READ: Cascarones: the Confetti-filled Eggs That Make Easter the Most Colorful Fiesta of the Year

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