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As Coachella Weekend Two Starts, Some Want Concertgoers To Respect Those Cleaning Up After Their Day Of Partying

Coachella is in its second weekend and people are excited about the exceptional lineup. Yet, while most festival-goers enjoy the music and decoration, few pay attention to the people who clean up after the festival ends for the night. Now, Twitter users are spreading the word about the people who make the festival the enjoyable and Instagramable experience it has come to be.

The Desert Sun reports that Coachella Vally farm workers are picking up night shifts to clean up the festival.

Credit: @Eloisalv / Instagram

According to the Desert Sun, some farm workers in the Coachella Valley work their full day in the fields and end the day with a night shift cleaning up the festival grounds. The workers start just after midnight when the last festival-goers leave the grounds and their shift ends at 3:30 a.m. with the grounds perfectly cleaned.

“Like a magic act,” Enriqueta Magaña, the team leader for those working double shifts, told the Desert Sun.

Festival-goers are using social media to give attention to the hard-working people who make the festival the dream getaway it is for all the Instagram posts.

Credit: @riogrande / Twitter

According to the Desert Sun, festival attendees have nothing nice to say to the people cleaning up the grounds of the Coachella festival. The partiers look down on the people working till 3:30 a.m. because their job involves them picking up the trash the partiers throw about.

“They don’t want to be near us,” Magaña told the Desert Sun. “They say, ‘They’re the ones who pick up the trash. They’re dirty.’”

Some concerned Coachella visitors want to make sure that the workers are being properly compensated for the hard and late work.

The Desert Sun reports that Goldenvoice, the company that produces Coachella, sold 250,000 tickets to the 2017 festival. In total, the festival pulled in $114.6 million. The farm workers pulling a second shift to clean the grounds reportedly get paid the minimum wage of $11 an hour.

The manual laborers sacrifice more than just their aching feet and sore backs to do the work. Between the day-long shift on the fields and the festival clean up, the laborers could work up to 48 hours during the three days of the music festival.

“What we do is nothing more than changing the trash bags,” Magaña told the Desert Sun. “This is not tiresome — you do this in your own house.” She added, “it’s tiresome for the people who aren’t used to staying awake past midnight.”

This conversation happens on the backdrop of Latinos finally getting a stronger representation at the festival that takes place in a Latino community.

Credit: @saldivarjolene / Twitter

The community around Coachella is one of hard working Latino laborers. They have provided the produce we eat every day and then turn around and clean up the mess from festival goers to insure a clean and fun experience. The lack of Latino representation at the festival in a place steeped in the culture is disappointing.

Fortunately, this year is giving Latinos a chance to shine in their own community. Specifically, Los Tucanes de Tijuana rocking out at Coachella was one highlight Latinos won’t forget. Now, if only the laborers who make sure the festival grounds are clean and ready for Coachella revelers could get the same respect and support.

READ: This Is Why You Saw Yalitza Aparicio’s Face All Over Coachella

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