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Cardi B, Anuel A, And Fat Joe Joined Forces To Deliver New Track With A Sample Of Salsa Classic ‘Aguanile’

Last night, rapper Fat Joe dropped the new track “Yes” featuring fellow Bronx native Cardi B and Puerto Rican trap star Anuel AA. This is that Latinx heat we need to keep us warm this fall. This marks Cardi B’s third feature this summer following the hits “Wish Wish” with DJ Khaled and “Rodeo” with Lil Nas X. Anuel AA hasn’t been having a bad summer himself with “China” featuring Ozuna, Daddy Yankee, J Balvin and Karol G, dominating the global charts. 

Fat Joe just celebrated his 49th birthday and will be releasing his 12th album “Family Ties” which also marks a reunion with Grammy-winning producer Dre of Cool & Dre. 

I don’t know if you know this but the Bronx’s official national anthem is Terror Squad’s “Lean Back.” Fat Joe is royalty in the Bronx, so it was practically inevitable we would get a Cardi B collab from the legend. This is the essence of boogie down solidarity. It is one thing to be Latinx, it is another thing to be a Latinx from The Bronx — it just is. Yerrr. So while I am sure many people will enjoy this bop, I am far more certain I will hear it blasting outside my window from someone’s car speakers for the rest of my mortal life. 

“Yes” is a yes from me, dawg.

Fat Joe dropped “Yes” at midnight last night. Cardi B and Anuel AA each have a verse on the track which samples Willie Colón and Hector Lavoe’s salsa classic “Aguanilé.” According to Rolling Stone, the 1972 song was inspired by the Yoruba and Spanish word “Aguanilé” which is used in Santería to describe a “spiritual cleanse.” No wonder the sample hauntingly pulls you into the song’s pulsating trap beat.

Joe raps the not safe for work earworm of a hook “A** up, facedown.” Considering these artists’ background, the single is fittingly a new strip club anthem. Cardi B got her start as a stripper in New York City and will play one in the new movie Hustlers alongside Jennifer Lopez and LizzoMeanwhile, Fat Joe plays Winny Win Winford, a New York City strip club owner in Netflix’s She’s Gotta Have It. The artwork for the single features an ’80s style neon sign silhouette of a naked woman on a stripper pole. You know, because we Latinxs love good clean fun in The Bronx. 

La Cardi!

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The dog walker.

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“La Cardi” the rapper says as she jumps on the track, leaning into her Dominican inflection. The song falls into the classic rap paradigm of boastful, decadent, lyrics. Each lyricist takes their turn flexing on the track, and we don’t really need more introspection than that because this song is clearly intended to be a fun club banger. 

“Murder and the money on my mind. My palm and my trigger finger itch,” she spits. “I’ve been in my bag, hopping out of jets.” 

Cardi may even be confirming her Bronx gang affiliation with the lyrics, “Lookin’ for me? Hit my line 1-800-59, BX.” The lyrics seem to allude to 5-9 Brims, a blood gang in The Bronx, at least according to Genius.

A bilingual bop.

Anuel AA’s verse is entirely in Spanish. I love this trend where Latinxs don’t try to assimilate and speak their native tongue. There is something to be said about Justin Bieber having to speak Spanish to get featured on Luis Fonsi’s “Despacito” rather than the other way around. In “Yes,” Anuel boasts about making $15 million a record amidst putting the usual haters in their place.  

Puffy approved. 

“This one is special, you know what I’m sayin? Puff Daddy told me and Cool way back in the day that every hit record has a story,” “Yes” producer Dre said in a series of Instagram stories. “And geeze … let’s just put it this way: This one was months in the making, but it was worth the wait … I think y’all really gonna fuck with it.”

Latinx power.

The Latinx chart domination shall continue henceforth. The Bronx’s come up shall continue ad infinitum as well. 

“When I came out, I knew I wasn’t the best rapper on earth. But I knew there was a bunch of Latinos that felt like me across the country and across the world, who really related to what I was rapping about, and that they would really appreciate it. Same thing when I discovered Big Pun,” Fat Joe told Remezcla of Latinx representation in hip hop. 

It is always great to see Latinx artists not just collaborating together but bringing also sampling throwback Latinx music to introduce it to new generations.

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