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Bad Bunny Goes Norteño: The Latin Trap Icon Joined Corrido Star Natanael Cano To Create The Wildest Mashup

Corrido is going from old-school abuelo music to a more urbano and trap-infused genre lately. The classic regional Mexican sound, known for its narrative folk ballads, is slowly but surely joining in on the ‘música urbana’ movement that has the whole world listening. And with Bad Bunny injecting his hip-hop and trap flair into the genre, we can confirm that corridos tumbados, are officially the new thing. 

After visiting Mexico for a run of tour dates in support of his latest album X 100Pre, Bad Bunny surprised us all with a unique project: a corrido. 

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

In his latest release, the trap-reggaeton star tapped the urban regional Mexican label, Rancho Humilde, for a collaboration that would bridge the gap between regional Mexican music and Puerto Rican música urbana —and surprise us all with the result. El Conejo Malo got in touch  with the urban corrido, or corrido tumbado artist, Natanael Cano.

Natanael Cano is part of a new school of Corrido, the ‘Corrido Tumbado’ which adds trap and urban influences to the classic genre.

Credit: natanael_cano / Instagram

Cano is part of a burgeoning movement of Mexican artists making trap corridos (or “corridos tumbados”) that incorporate hip-hop elements into the traditional corrido style. At just 18, Cano has turned into an internet sensation. His viral hits “El F1” and “El Drip” have more than 17 million views on Youtube. And his song “El de la Codeína” made it to #1 on Apple Music’s Latino chart.

With the remix to ‘Soy El Diablo’ Bad Bunny wants to promote unity among all Latinx communities.

Credit: natanael_cano / Instagram

Bad Bunny and Natanel Cano emerged with a remix of Cano’s gritty 2019 track, “Soy El Diablo” (“I Am the Devil”). Taking cues from the Sonora native, Bunny sings Cano’s lines in his unmistakably Caribbean accent, over strums of acoustic guitar.

“Para mi gente linda de Mexico, Puerto Rico, Latinoamerica/Eso es pa’ toda mi raza/ America es nuestra casa,” says one of Bad Bunny’s lines —using the song as a platform to promote unity among all Latinx communities. “This is for my beautiful people in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Latin America/This is for my race/America is our home!”

Bad Bunny had been teasing the collab for a few weeks.

The unlikely pair dropped the first official urbano/corrido collab in October, weeks after teasing at it with Benito posting videos of himself on Instagram singing along to the song and drinking tequila from the bottle. “It’s something I never imagined. Like, zero percent,” Cano said in an interview about the remix. But the Mexican artist is acutely aware of the important place that Latin urbano sounds hold in the global musical landscape of the moment. “We’re the new generation [of regional], and we have that other sound naturally inside of us. It’s organic.”

In the song Bad Bunny even uses regional Mexican slang and references.

The corrido opens with Bad Bunny’s “Ajuaaaa.” His delivery, and even his slang —which include shout outs to Canelo Álvarez and Rancho Humilde and words like “compa,” and “banda” are typical of the regional genre to refer to the people— show the importance that Benito gave this remix.

The collab was first suggested to both parties by Marissa Gastelum, who runs Latin artist relations at Apple Music.

Credit: ranchohumilde/ Instagram

“In September, Noah [Assad, Bad Bunny’s manager] called me and asked me what I thought of this kid,” recalls Gastelum in an interview with Billboard. “He told me Bad Bunny really loves this song ‘Soy El Diablo.’ And I said, wait, lets do something!”

Gastelum called Jimmy Humilde, the owner of indie Rancho Humilde  Records, to which Cano is signed. Humilde, who has worked to create an “urban regional” sound that appeals to a younger generation of regional Mexican fans, thought it was a great idea, and so the regional/urban remix was born.

Bad Bunny chased his tequila-fueled release with a string of New England tour dates — and a stint as guest lecturer at Harvard University. If we can count on Benito to do one thing, it’s to inject his cool-effect on anything he touches. 

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