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This Video Of People In Japan Dancing To Bachata And Merengue Shows The Power Of Music Around The World

Listen to a radio station in nearly any city in the world and you’re gonna hear at least a few hit Latino artists streaming over those airwaves.

From LA to New York, London to Paris, Toronto to even Tokyo, Latino music seems to be taking over the world. And you’re not imagining it. Latino artists quickly risen to become one of the most played and streamed music groups everywhere in the world.

And this absolutely sickening video of Japanese dancers enjoying some bachata at a club in Japan proves it.

Artist Tony Peralta came across the Latino-music loving group and uploaded the video of them killing the dance moves to his Twitter.

One Twitter user pointed out that Japan has been a fan of Latin music for a very long time.

Credit: @peraltaprjct / Twitter

Orquesta de la Luz helped launch the Latin music craze in Japan during the 1990s and it’s remained ever since.

Before Orquesta de la Luz, the only other Japanese salsa band to make headlines was Orquesta del Sol, emerging around 1978. They’re said to have influenced Nora and her bandmates, and some even refer to them as the first and foremost Japanese salsa band. But by comparison, their impact was not so immense and widespread as that of Orquesta de la Luz.

Turns out basically where ever you go in Japan you’re gonna hear Latin music.

Credit: @JimmyCaldero / Twitter

We had no idea that Latin music – from salsa and merengue to reggaeton – was so popular across Japan. But we are living for this!

One Twitter user wanted to remind us all of the close relationship between Japan and Latin America.

Credit: @quemirasnojoda / Twitter

It’s true. In fact, the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo is home to more Japanese than any other city outside of Japan. The city’s Libertad district is the largest Japanese community in the world and Japanese culture plays a huge part in shaping local Paulista identity, from the food to the music.

I mean J Balvin is even collaborating with a major Japanese hip hop group.

Credit: @AkibaCam / Twitter

Reggaetonero and Latin music superstar J Balvin has teamed up with Japan-based hip-hop trio m-flo on the theme song for a new animated movie, called HUMAN LOST, to be released in theaters worldwide this fall.

And with the popularity of Japan’s anime culture and Latino music increasing around the world, this collaboration makes perfect sense for the “Mi Gente” singer to do.

And it’s not just in Japan. Latinos are hearing their music all over the world.

Credit: @peraltaprjct / Twitter

Yup, from cities across Europe and the US to tiny town in Canada, western Africa, Hong Kong, and yes, Tokyo, Latino music is taking over the world and we couldn’t be more excited.

And this isn’t #fakenews. Latino music really is dominating music charts around the world.

I mean look at the Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee hit ‘Despacito.’ That track is now tied for the longest-running No. 1 ever, in any language, on the Hot 100. And although that’s huge news, it’s nothing when you look at the sheer number of Latino songs hitting the charts.

In 2017, there were a record 19 predominantly Spanish-language tracks that made it onto the Billboard Hot 100. That’s up from just 4 in 2016 and 3 in 2015.

Ok, so it’s obvious Latino music is having a huge moment.

Regardless of how you mix and match it, the reality remains that never in the modern history of the Billboard charts have so many tracks in Spanish coexisted on the Hot 100. So what happened?

As far as the music goes, it’s danceable. That’s a major key, because by making us think with our feet instead of our head, it becomes language-agnostic. 

Now, thanks to the impact of reggaeton, we suddenly have an avalanche of danceable Latin tracks with a pop feel, and the combination is universally appealing. Witness Maluma, whose music seems to work in every language and every territory. 

Some mad collaborations are also helping drive the popularity of Latino artists and their music.

The clincher, however, has been collaborations — both between Latin acts, and between Latin and mainstream acts. Yes, “Despacito” was a hit pre-Bieber, but it became a juggernaut once he got on the track. Same for “Mi Gente” and Beyonce and now, Cardi B with Ozuna on “A Modelo.” The fact that the biggest acts in the world want to record in Spanish opens ears for Latin music around the world.

READ: J Balvin Gets In The Business Of Japanese Hip Hop As He Announces New Project For Anime Film

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