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There’s A Women-Led Tequila Brand Inspired By Día De Muertos And You Need To Try It

A women-led company has made Satryna a new premium tequila inspired by Día de Muertos. The brand which boasts a 60-year-old family recipe passed down three generations have made the tequila with The Day of the Dead in mind. Using luxurious and premium ingredients, Satryna is only available in small batches and will cost you a pretty penny. 

Owner Nitzan Marrun, an heir to the legendary Tequilera Newton and Maestra Tequilera Mireida Cortes from Tequilera Newton have joined forces to launch Satryna Blanco, a triple distilled version and Satryna Cristalino, an Añejo Claro versio. 

During Día de Muertos, a Mexican celebration of remembering and honoring the dead, it is not uncommon to use a bottle or shot of tequila as an ofrenda. Enter: Satryna. 

A tequila inspired by the owner’s Mexican heritage.

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The handcrafted glass bottle makes an intricate display of Mexican iconography. The focal image is a modern mockup of La Catrina. Mostcommonly depicted as a female skeleton in European style clothing to symbolize she is ashamed of her indigenous ancestry. La Catrina is an icon of Día de Muertos thanks to Jose Guadalupe’s Posada’s original satirical illustration in the early 1900s. 

“[Día de Muertos]is not only a very powerful and mystic celebration that brings together all Mexicans, but also great care is taken with every aspect of the celebration to honor our ancestors,” Marrun told Forbes. “Likewise my Satryna tequila is mystic, powerful and great care has been taken into every aspect in order to honor my ancestors and their legacy.” 

Each bottle is handcrafted and etched with ancient Aztec sketching, the metal topper is a sugar school, but more than that Marrun believes is a key part of Día de Muertos celebrations. 

“Tequila is part of the ofrenda,” says Marrun. “It’s an offering to the dead, which is an essential part of this day’s celebration…It is a way of honoring our family and friends who have past away with the food and drinks that they liked the most when they were alive. When we set an offering for my ancestors, we always place our favorite drink, Satryna tequila.”

A 60-year-old family secret finally comes to light in Satryna. 

A descendant of the Newton family Tequilera, Marrun says she spent years honing her craft and learning the family’s traditional methods. It took time but she was able to convince her family to release the 60-year-old family recipe that has been tweaked with Marrun’s learnings. 

“Growing up in Mexico, Nitzan developed a passion for tequila and spent considerable time honing the craft and dreamt one day her tequila would be admired and sold all over the world,” the company website reads. “After many years of convincing her family, they have now decided to release this legendary tequila so that true aficionados around the world can savor this special gift of Mexico.” 

The process of making Satryna is pretty intense.

Satryna is made from 100 percent blue weber agave curated from the “Tequila Valley of Mexico” in Jalisco. The agave is derived from the rich volcanic soil in the area and grown for eight to 12 years. When it is perfect, the agave liquid is extracted, then fermented and distilled three times. Lastly, it’s aged in oak barrels from California and Cognac. 

“The semi-arid and semi-humid soil in the rich agricultural lands of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt is ideal for the harvest of our sweet agave plants. Each hand-selected and harvested is ripened to perfection only after being nurtured for eight to 12 long years,” according to the website. 

Satryna claims their Maestro Tequilero utilizes a tequila making process that is centuries old combined with a modern distillation process to ensure purity and smoothness. 

Each bottle of the spirit is numbered and signed by Carlos Newton, one of  Tequilera Newton founder Enrique Newton’s descendants. Satryna Blanco pricing starts at $90 and Satryna Cristalino starts at $169. It is quite the investment but the laborious process and the owner’s attention to detail explain the costly price tag. Moreover, the stunning bottle, with it’s intricate and historical artwork, wouldn’t make a bad centerpiece a once the contents are gone.

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