wearemitu

These Food Trends That You Did For The IG Posts Should Be Left In The 2010s Where They Belong

Trends, by definition, come and go, and they affect every aspect of our lives, from our hairstyles to the way we decorate our living rooms. But just like perms and mullets, there are certain trends from the food world that were a little outrageous and/or ridiculous. We rounded up the trendiest food fads of the decade so you can remember all the random meals you shared on your social media #foodstagram. 

Sushirrito

View this post on Instagram

????➕????=????

A post shared by @ goldengate2rainbowgate on

Why limit yourself to tiny sushi rolls, when you can indulge in an entire burrito filled with all the typical sushi fixings. Plus, it’s far more convenient to trot around with a compact burrito than with an entire tray of sushi + chopsticks.

Acai bowls

As the food trends of the 2010s have taught us, people love bowls, superfoods, and yogurts. So it should come as no surprise that when the Brazilian sweet treat that features a smoothie-like base topped with fresh fruit and nuts hit the U.S., it became an instant favorite. Not to mention, the visual presentation is Instagram-perfect.

Quinoa

Rice is so 2008. This Peruvian whole grain, complete-protein swap can be found starring in Buddha bowls, oatmeal-inspired breakfasts, soup recipes, and even rice pudding remixes.

Avocado Toast

Someone put avocado on bread and deemed it a standalone meal called “avocado toast.” Innovation. Bonus points for showy garnishes on your avocado toast such as crispy prosciutto, a fried egg, Everything Bagel Seasoning, or apples and blue cheese. 

Burrito bowls

With the nationwide take-over of Tex-Mex eateries, like Chipotle and Moe’s Southwest Grill, the prominence of the burrito bowl hit an all-time high in the mid-2010s. Featuring all the fixings of a typical burrito, the bowl is an option you can feel good about because it ditches the tortilla wrap for a lower-carb alternative.

Cronut

Do you remember when New York went crazy for the cronut? This hybrid croissant-doughnut was invented (and trademarked) by Dominique Ansel at his bakery in New York, proving so popular that people started recreating them across the country —and the whole world for that matter.

Kombucha

Kombucha is a probiotic drink that’s having a bit of a moment. In grocery stores and Whole Foods across the nation, you can choose from about a dozen different brands and flavors, all of which have an artisanal quality that whispers “you are SOOOOOO taking care of yourself… you are.

Kale chips 

They’re crisp, green, salty, taste freakily like salted potato crisps —and they’re made from kale, the super trendy member of the cabbage family renowned for its high nutrients and celebrity fans.

Cauliflower pizza crust 

Cauliflower happens to tick more than a few of the boxes that characterize eating in the 2010s: it’s gluten-free, low in calories and carbs, and also works well as a meat substitute. In addition, the vegetable offers a hefty dose of fiber, it’s inexpensive, quick to cook and is versatile. Someone finally found how to put the bland cruciferous to good use.

Zoodles

Zucchini was just the beginning. As a result of this growing food trend of the 2010s, we’re spiralizing a true alphabet of produce, including apples, beets, cucumbers, sweet potatoes, turnips, and of course, zucchini.

Matcha everything

Food-forward Instagrammers are increasingly as likely to snap a picture of a matcha latte (using the hashtag #matcha, of course) as they are a cappuccino, and they can now do so at specialty matcha cafés cropping up across the country, from New York to California to Hanoi. Said cafes serve everything from croissants to cakes to cold-pressed juices, all infused with the magical green powder.

Tea-toxes

If you were on Instagram in 2013, you are probably aware of the ‘teatox’ trend. It comprised of two and four-week programs which allegedly used the ‘power of herbal teas to help you lose weight’, by supposedly ‘ridding the body of toxins’. A fancy way to describe a good old laxative tea.

Charcoal ice-cream

There are two kinds of food that exist solely to be Instagrammed. There’s the gregarious type, prefixed by “unicorn,” striped through with bright colors and dusted with glitter. And then there is its grim cousin, which exists in simple, stark monochrome. Over the last few years, the trend for black food has been growing. From black-bun burgers to black cheese —the most successful midnight-hued food fad was the activated charcoal ice-cream.

Pumpkin spice everything

Starbucks launched its iconic Pumpkin Spice Latte is 2003, and it started a craze that’s carried over into this decade. Today, you can find all sorts of pumpkin spice foods in the fall, like Pumpkin Spice Cookies, classic Pumpkin Spice Bread and even pumpkin spice toothpaste, no joke.

Rainbow desserts 

Rainbow-colored food really peaked in popularity during the late 2010s. Images of brightly colored milkshakes, bagels, and even grilled cheese sandwiches filled social media feeds. The color-dye trend garnered a title in tribute to the food’s whimsical appearance: unicorn food.

Poké bowls

In the ’90s, it was sushi, then came the poké. Someone put Hawaii’s poké in a bowl and it spread far and wide overnight. Yet another food bowl obsession for us to Instagram the hell out of.

Paleo

Eating old school—we’re talking hunter and gatherer old—was big news in the 2010s. Eliminate dairy, grains, legumes, and processed foods and sugars, and you’ll shed weight because you’re filling up on fiber, fat, and protein, say Paleo diet devotees.

READ: The Concha Burger Is Real And It May Be The Ultimate Food Mashup

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com