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People Are Claiming To See Frida Kahlo’s Ghost At Her Home And Museum In Mexico City

It’s been almost 70 years since the death of beloved artist and activist Frida Kahlo, who passed away in 1954 at just 47 years old. She remains to this day one of the world’s most famous and loved artists.

In fact, her former home is now a museum and one of Mexico’s most visited attractions. But after all these years is it possible that her spirit walks the Earth and is paying visits to those who venture inside her home?

That’s the rumor at the Frida Kahlo Museum in Mexico City, which is based in Casa Azul, the blue-walled home that Kahlo shared with her husband, Mexican muralist Diego Rivera.

There are persistent rumors about a ghostly presence at Casa Azul, Kahlo’s former home.

Mexico City’s Casa Azul – the former home and now museum of Frida Kahlo – is one of the city’s top destinations for visitors. Fans of the artist from around the world are drawn to the site to pay honor or tribute to one of the world’s most popular artists.

Kahlo meant so much to so many people that it makes sense people are now sharing stories of their unusually encounters while inside the museum.

A docent (who’s worked at the museum for 15 years) told me a Frida Kahlo ghost is rumored to wander the rooms of Casa Azul. While another similar testimonial was shared in a book by Ariana Davis, What Would Frida Do? A Guide to Living Boldly, a new life-advice book that channels the artist’s fearless spirit, boundless creativity, and tireless embrace of self-expression.

“Curators like to say that, sometimes, Frida returns to her old home after dark; her shape has been seen filling out corsets and skirts as if she’s borrowing her old clothing for the night,” Davis writes.

And these aren’t the only such tales of a possible ghost in the museum.

In an undated article published by the California website Southbay, Marlene Strang writes that “the museum’s director confided to us that on occasion, she has heard the sound of labored footsteps emanating from Frida’s office in the basement when no one was there. She also mentioned witnessing supernatural phenomena, such as the appearance of wet footprints on the grounds seemingly out of nowhere, but was quick to point out that her sense of Frida’s presence is benign, playful, and ever welcome.”

Even before these recent stories, there were long rumors surrounding the artist’s death.

One spooky story has long made the rounds surrounding the circumstances of Kahlo’s cremation. The long-standing legend has it that while her corpse was being cremated, Kahlo sat straight up amid the head and appeared to smile as her hair caught fire, creating a corona of flames around her head.

Although spooky, many are excited at the prospect of encountering Kahlo’s alleged ghost.

Credit: Casa Azul / Google Arts & Culture

Because her art was so deeply personal, it’s no wonder that her fans feel so closely connected to Kahlo that they’d welcome the chance to encounter her ghost. One Kahlo expert even had some advice as to how you might do just that.

“Frida is everywhere,” according to Mary-Anne Martin, who specializes in Mexican and Latin American art. “If you want to see her on the Day of the Dead you should leave her some good tequila. She’ll like that.”

But Frida’s Casa Azul isn’t the only allegedly haunted site in the city more the country.

Credit: omgitsjustintime / Instagram

Whether it’s terrifying tales of weeping murder victims or whispering mummies, Mexico has plenty to offer visitors in search of the macabre. In Mexico City near Xochimilco, you’ll find the now Instagram-famous Isla de Las Muñecas. Discolored plastic dolls hang from the branches of the island’s trees, many with missing heads or limbs and it’s considered to be one of the city’s most haunted places.

Also in Mexico City, the Posada del Sol, is largely thought to be haunted. One of the underground chambers of the hotel is believed to be haunted by the ghost of a young girl who was found dead in the building. The site is not open to the public but those who have ventured into the hotel often leave gifts of candy at an altar in order to avoid her curse.

But not all of the city’s haunted haunts are scary. Many locals believe that the Tasqueña station, on the city’s metro, is the spookiest spot. An elderly man reportedly haunts solo commuters waiting on the platform. But fear not – the ghost is said to be friendly. It is said that the man died during an assault at the station and is looking to protect passengers from a similar fate.

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