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13 Facts You Might Not Know About Tajín

Tajín is one of those things that you just don’t question. It’s just always existed–in someone’s purse, on the ring of your margarita, in savory and sweet treats alike. There are no rules when it comes to Tajín. It’s just been in the family since forever.

No matter how ubiquitous Tajín is in your pantry, purse, or every family photo on the mantle, we bet you didn’t know these facts about fruit’s favorite seasoning.

Tajín™ has blessed our people for nearly 35 years.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

But of course, like every other Mexican food company, the flavors are built off traditional Mexican flavors that have been around much longer. We all get to toast our Tajín-rimmed michelada’s to an abuela.

We owe *this* to an abuelita named Mama Necha.

@eloteslapurisima / Instagram

The story goes that Tajín founder Horacio Fernandez was just a boy when his abuela, Necha, would make her signature sauce. He would shout, “Mama Necha made her sauce!” That would set off alarms for friends and family to gather around the table.

Mama Necha would use seven different chiles to make the sauce.

@at_ghost / Instagram

Horacio specifically loved pouring the sauce over a fresh elote. His website describes the “Aha!” moment as “One day, as he delighted in the way the sauce ran down the sides of his corn cob he thought how wonderful it would be if there were a way for the whole world to taste this sauce.”

From then on, Horacio started developing a special process to dehydrate the limes and chiles.

@Elton_Osorio / Twitter

Horacio’s goal with Tajín wasn’t to recreate the exact sauce his abuela created. He wanted to preserve the quality and flavors of the sauce–in a dehydrated form.

Tajín is technically a “powdered sauce.”

@taerimasu / Twitter

It might say ‘seasoning’ on the bottle but, since it’s 1993 year of launch in the U.S. market, Tajín has been a pioneer in the “powdered sauce” category.

Horacio’s powdered his abuela’s recipe so that way he could bring the flavors everywhere he went.

@tajinusa / Instagram

It’s advertised as a way to spice up fruit and vegetables, but we’re all sneaking it’s miniature size into every movie theater like our mamis taught us. The trope that Latinos are spicy is probably because of tajín.

The name came after Horacio visited the Tajín archeological site in Veracruz.

@renistraveler / Instagram

Horacio was on a trip to delve further into Mexico’s rich history. He was mesmerized by the ruins of Tajín, and once he found out “aji” means chile in the Nahuatl language, it was all over for him. He launched his company and named it Tajín in 1985.

Every purchase of Tajín helps support the National School of Ceramics.

“Responsabilidad Social” Digital Image. Tajín. 21 June 2019.

Horacio wanted to make sure that his company did more to preserve Mexican culture. Tajín undoubtedly has made an impact to spread the culture globally, but what about at home?

The school is working to provide Bachelors, Masters and P.h.D. degrees, but for now it’s offering workshops and classes to preserve a cornerstone of Mexican arts.

The bottle label says “THIS IS NOT CANDY” for a reason.

@indulge_gourmetdesserts / Instagram

Apparently, children have been known to eat it straight from the bottle. The seasoning is made of seven different chiles, and, as good as it tastes going down, we imagine children’s tummies couldn’t quite handle it.

Tajín has become part of countless signature drink recipes.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

Granted, most of us just sprinkle Tajín onto every drink. The best micheladas and bloody marys are spiced up with Tajín.

The only covered strawberries Latinos want are chamoy and Tajín covered strawberries.

@sweettreatsbyjazz / Instagram

How good do these spicy strawberries look? Those are chamoy infusers????

Tajín leaves people feeling more body positive than before.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

One Tajín fan likes to use the varying size options as a reminder to stay bo-po. Her caption reads, “Just a friendly Tajín reminder to love yourself . We come in all shapes , colors, & sizes. ❤️????????????????????”

Tajín is completely allergen-free and Kosher.

@ashleyfozfit / Instagram

It’s safe for everyone, y’all! Spread the word–Tajín might not have been around B.C. but it’s going to be around for a long, long time.

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