Things That Matter

YouTuber Daisy Marquez Shared Her Story Of Being Undocumented So She Could Help Others In The Same Situation

Beauty and lifestyle YouTuber, Daisy Marquez, started posting makeup tutorials on Snapchat for fun and then switched over to other platforms growing a fanbase of over one million followers across all of her social media platforms. 

What started as simply a fierce beauty and makeup channel turned into something much more as Daisy decided to share her experience as an undocumented person living in the US.

Last week, as ICE raids were set to happen across the country, Daisy shared to Instagram her story as an undocumented DREAMER.

Credit: daisymarquez_ / Instagram

In the caption she said why she wanted to tell her story, ” I want to open up and share my story for those who don’t know.” She goes on to tell the story of how when she was 10-years-old, she wanted to visit her family in Mexico. She made the trip but had to cross back into the US illegally, with a coyote, across the Rio Grande, and was nearly caught by Border Patrol.

Thankfully, her story had a happy ending and she made it back into the US and has gone on to be a successful YouTuber.

But Daisy hopes that sharing her story will help inspire others who have similar experiences as her.

Reactions to her Instagram post have been overwhelmingly positive.

There are literally more than a million people in the US who can relate to her story as a DREAMER and millions who are in the shadows – as undocumented people so often are.

With many people thanking her for her bravery and inspiration.

Many on Instagram pointed at how strong and brave she was even at 10-yeras-old and how she’s carried that fearlessness in everything she does.

Even her mama took to Instagram to share in the love.

Aww, this is just too sweet!

Along with her story, Daisy shared pictures of her on her trip to Mexico.

Credit: daisymarquez_ / Instagram

And her fans were eating up the photos! Telling her how fierce she looks and that she was born to be a star.

Even at 10, Daisy knew how to serve looks.

Credit: daisymarquez_ / Instagram

Daisy says she was a fierce, determined, and strong young lady who wasn’t afraid of anything, until it came time to cross back into the US.

Many on Instagram commented on how fearless she looked in the photos while others said she looked like a child telenovela star.

All of this started when Daisy uploaded a video to her YouTube channel back in 2017, shortly after Trump took office.

Marquez’s YouTube video, “Story Time: I’m Undocumented,” received more than 1.3 million views, making it the most popular video on her channel. In the video she talks about her immigration status, her struggles of being undocumented and shared a story about the time she had to cross the US -Mexico border when she was 10.

In the heartfelt video, Daisy opens up about how her mom brought her to the US to help give her a better life.

As with so many of our parents who crossed into the US illegally, her mother wanted to make sure that Daisy would get a better education and have more opportunities in this world as an adult.

She then tells the story about how desperately she wanted to visit her family in Mexico when she was 10 years old.

Credit: @lalajanet69 / Twitter

After about a month in Jalisco, Mexico, with her grandparents, her mother had explained through a phone call that she would have to return to the US with a coyote and cross the Rio Grande.

Marquez was awakened by her grandmother at 3 a.m. to start the journey. Marquez begged her to let her stay in Mexico, regretting ever going down south, but alas, Marquez was taken to the coyotes who would help her cross back in the US.

In the video, as she wipes away tears, Daisy explains the entire harrowing experience of crossing into the US with a small group of people. They have to swim across the Rio Grande, encounter the Border Patrol, run out of water, and have to walk a total of nearly 7 hours.

She points out how traumatizing the experience was simply to go back to the visit the country she was born in.

And how people shouldn’t have to suffer such a traumatic experience and even risk their lives simply to visit the country they were born in. Or to visit their abuelos and other familia.

Even though she applied to 7 different colleges and was accepted to all of them, she couldn’t attend any of them.

When Marquez safely returned home to Oak Cliff, eight years had passed, and while pursuing her love for makeup and balancing school work, her new test of strength came after graduation: her immigration status held her back from doing the things she wanted to do — like attending college.

“I worked my ass off, I took college classes, graduated with distinct honors … all that went to waste all because I’m from Mexico,” she said in her video.

Marquez discussed in her video that despite being accepted to every college she had applied to, the cost of going would be at a much higher rate because of her status as an international student, a burden she did not want to put on her parents’ back.

Stuck between school and chasing her passion for makeup and fashion, she took the plunge and dedicated her life to creating more videos for her followers.

As a successful YouTuber she’s had to pass on several amazing opportunities because of her immigration status.

Credit: @daisymarquez_ / Twitter

From a trip to Bora Bora to having to move her life to Los Angeles in order to pursue her dreams as an artist, Daisy is not shy about sharing her struggles, dreams, and aspirations on her YouTube channel.

She ends her video by reminding all the people who may be in the same situation to never give up on your dreams.

Sharing a deeply personal story, as Daisy did, is often one of the strongest ways to reach people, to inspire them. And with an estimated 1.3 million eligible DACA recipients in the US, let’s hope that her story has inspired many of them to chase their dreams.

And her story seems to have resonated with a lot of people.

Credit: @daisymarquez_ / Twitter

Reactions on Twitter to Daisy’s video, range from tweets of tears and sadness for her story to “bravo daisy, you’re amazing” and “thank you so much for sharing your personal story. with it i hope others see their own potential.”

READ: Thousands Of DREAMers Are Not Applying For Financial Aid And Officials Want To Change That Now

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

The Little-Known Underground Railroad That Ran South to Mexico

Culture

The Little-Known Underground Railroad That Ran South to Mexico

Tyrone Turner / Getty Images

Latinos make up the largest minority group in the country, yet our history is so frequently left out of classrooms. From Chicano communities in Texas and California to Latinos in the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s and the Underground Railroad – which also had a route into Mexico – Latinos have helped shape and advance this country.

And as the U.S. is undergoing a racial reckoning around policing and systemic racism, Mexico’s route of the Underground Railroad is getting renewed attention – particularly because Mexico (for the very first time in history) has counted its Afro-Mexican population as its own category in this year’s census.

The Underground Railroad also ran south into Mexico and it’s getting renewed attention.

Most of us are familiar with stories of the Underground Railroad. It was a network of clandestine routes and safe houses established in the U.S. during the early to mid-19th century. It was used by enslaved African Americans to escape into free states and Canada. It grew steadily until the Civil War began, and by one estimate it was used by more than 100,000 enslaved people to escape bondage.

In a story reported on by the Associated Press, there is renewed interest in another route on the Underground Railroad, one that went south into Mexico. Bacha-Garza, a historian, dug into oral family histories and heard an unexpected story: ranches served as a stop on the Underground Railroad to Mexico. Across Texas and parts of Louisiana, Alabama, and Arkansas, scholars and preservation advocates are working to piece together the story of a largely forgotten part of American history: a network that helped thousands of Black slaves escape to Mexico.

According to Maria Hammack, a doctoral candidate at the University of Texas at Austin studying the passage of escapees who crossed the borderlands for sanctuary in Mexico, about 5,000 to 10,000 people broke free from bondage into the southern country. Currently, no reliable figures currently exist detailing how many left to Mexico, unlike the more prominent transit into Canada’s safe haven.

Mexico abolished slavery a generation before Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation.

Thirty-four years before Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, in 1829, Mexican President Vicente Guerrero, who was of mixed background, including African heritage, abolished slavery in the country. The measure freed an estimated 200,000 enslaved Africans Spain forcefully brought over into what was then called New Spain and would later open a pathway for Blacks seeking freedom in the Southern U.S.

And he did so while Texas was still part of the country, in part prompting white, slave-holding immigrants to fight for independence in the Texas Revolution. Once they formed the Republic of Texas in 1836, they made slavery legal again, and it continued to be legal when Texas joined the U.S. as a state in 1845.

With the north’s popular underground railroad out of reach for many on the southern margins, Mexico was a more plausible route to freedom for these men and women.

Just like with the northern route, helping people along the route was dangerous and could land you in serious trouble.

Credit: Library of Congress / Public Domain

Much like on the railway’s northern route into Canada, anyone caught helping African-Americans fleeing slavery faced serious and severe consequences.

Slaveholders were aware that people were escaping south, and attempted to get Mexico to sign a fugitive slave treaty that would, like the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 that demanded free states to return escapees, require Mexico to deliver those who had left. Mexico, however, refused to sign, contending that all enslaved people were free once they reached Mexican soil. Despite this, Hammock said that some Texans hired what was called “slave catchers” or “slave hunters” to illegally cross into the country, where they had no jurisdiction, to kidnap escapees.

“The organization that we know today as the Texas Rangers was born out of an organization of men that were slave hunters,” Hammack, who is currently researching how often these actions took place, told the AP. “They were bounty hunters trying to retrieve enslaved property that crossed the Rio Grande for slave owners and would get paid according to how far into Mexico the slaves were found.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mexico Wants American Tourists Despite Ongoing Covid Pandemic

Culture

Mexico Wants American Tourists Despite Ongoing Covid Pandemic

VV Nincic / Flickr

Covid-19 has ended a lot of stuff for a lot of people. The most obvious change has been to international travel, especially for Americans. As the virus has spread widely across the U.S. countries have put a halt to allowing American tourist within their border, but not Mexico.

Covid-19 has severly depreciated the American passport.

Once capable of unlocking so many countries, the U.S. passport is no longer helping Americans travel abroad. Instead, the American passport has now become a hindrance for global travelers. Most countries have placed restrictions on American tourists making the U.S. passport one of the weakest.

The countries banning the U.S. are doing so because of the state of the virus in the country.

There have been more than 7 million cases of Covid-19 and more than 200,000 deaths from the virus. The U.S. remains the worst hit country and the global epicenter of the deadly virus. Many blame the lack of a national strategy to properly close down, test citizens, and contact trace those who have been exposed as the reason the virus has been so devastating in the U.S.

The various travel bans have kept families apart.

Other nations went into mush stricter lockdowns that the U.S. and got a handle of the virus. European countries have gotten the virus under control after months and the U.S. continues to see a large number of new cases daily.

One of the countries allowing Americans to visit is Mexico.

Mexico is heavily reliant on the money made from the tourism industry. According to official statistics, the tourism industry is the third-largest contributor to the country’s GDP. Major tourist destinations like Cabo and Cancún saw dramatic dips in tourism leading to national and local figures to sound the alarm. According to The Washington Post, the questions was posed about when to allow the tourists from the U.S. back, not should they.

Los Cabos is one of the hardest-hit tourist destinations.

The tourist destination saw a severe decline in tourists during one of the busiest times of the year. According to The Washington Post, the resort city has lost 80 percent of its revenue because of Covid-19. The virus has brought financial devastation to people across the world and the cities they live in aren’t immune to failing themselves.

“It’s life or death for us,” Rodrigo Esponda, the head of the Los Cabos tourism board, told The Washington Post. “There’s nothing else here. No industrial production. No farming or commercial fishing. It’s tourism or nothing.”

Yet, Los Cabos should be a warning sign to the rest of Mexico.

Cases in Baja California, the state where Los Cabos is located, saw new Covid case numbers triple from 50 a day to 150. The increase in infections is to be expected as the state rolled out the welcome mat for Americans coming to visit the resort town.

“There are some residents who say, ‘Why put my family’s life in danger by inviting more visitors, restarting more flights?’” Luis Humberto Araiza López, tourism minister of Baja California Sur, told The Washington Post. “It’s a delicate line between trying to support public health and economic growth.”

Despite this, there are some countries that Americans can travel to.

The countries Americans can travel to without Covid restrictions are Albania, Belarus, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Mexico, North Macedonia, Serbia, Turkey, and Zambia. As the world continues to open up, Americans who travel abroad are waiting for the U.S. government to get the virus under control. Until then, the U.S. passport is not the same it used to be.

READ: The U.S. Passport Was Once The World’s Strongest, It’s Fallen To 25th Place Thanks To Failed Leadership Amid Coronavirus

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com