Things That Matter

VIDEO: A Woman Is Now Walmart Wendy After Calling The Cops On A Latino Man While He Was Working

The internet is filled with videos lately of people willing to let their racism show in full force. We’ve seen Permit Patty, Taco Truck Tammy, and, now, we have Walmart Wendy. The incident took place in April in Glendora, California and the internet is just now hearing about it. Here is what went down from what we can see in the video.

An unnamed woman decided that a Southern California Edison contract worker was just too suspicious for her to handle.

Credit: Karla V Aceituno / Facebook

The video starts with the man recording and asking the woman what she had just said. She refuses to acknowledge him. Instead, Walmart Wendy is on the phone trying to talk to Glendora police and can be heard telling the 911 operator that she is standing in front of a man the looks illegal.

The altercation started, according to Walmart Wendy, because he asked her to move her car so he could park his work truck straight.

Credit: @jhoanafloress / Twitter

After he asked her to move her car, she unleashed. According to Walmart Wendy, the man recording her “punked” someone for the outfit so he would look legit but he belongs in Mexico.

“He came out of the bushes. He’s trying to take pictures of me,” she tells the police. She adds, “He’s taking a picture of me and the guy behind him might snap my neck.”

People were, somehow, surprised that his kind of hate and hate still exists in the U.S.

Credit: @bethhmoraless / Twitter

The woman spends the time flipping her middle finger at the man behind the camera and calling him illegal. The whole time, Walmart Wendy stays on the phone with the police asking for help.

Then, a man started to defend the worker from his car calling out Walmart Wendy’s racism.

The unidentified man addresses Walmart Wendy from his car telling her that he is working with the company actively working in the background. She responds calling him “creepy from Mexico” and that he is illegal. That is when the unidentified man from the car calls her racist.

“No it’s not racist,” Walmart Wendy yells. “My dad is black. My dad is black. I’m not racist. This guy’s from Mexico. They punk people and they don’t know everybody’s god damn illegal shit. Do you understand? My dad’s black. Don’t call me racist, asshole.”

Then she made one comment everyone is really interested in.

Credit: @the_dijana / Twitter

“I want to make sure this guy is legit. I don’t want him punking somebody,” she yelled. “he could be punking your f*cking job, taking your outfit, working to get paperwork.”

She adds: “Don’t call me racist because he’s Mexican. My little nephew is Italian, Mexican, and aloha. You stupid f*ck. Don’t tell me I’m racist.”

Like, people just want to know what it means to be aloha.

Credit: @brooklyndjones / Twitter

This was all after Walmart Wendy continued to say that she wants to make sure the worker is legit and to make sure he has a green card.

It might have happened months ago but the incoherent ramblings from Walmart Wendy continue to captivate people.

Credit: @KCMeRollinDTX / Twitter

This is a trend that we have seen growing on social media. Cell phones have been utilized to catch people in the act of verbally assaulting people because of their skin color and language.

This kind of behavior has spread under President Trump as more and more people feel comfortable enough to act on their racism and prejudices.

Credit: @RojoYvette / Twitter

The racist altercations in the U.S. are nothing new. However, technology and social media are making it easier and more accessible for people to finally see it. The cell phone camera and doxxing are exposing the racists who are showing themselves parroting the same rhetoric from President Trump.

Watch the full altercation below.

Posted by Karla V Aceituno on Monday, April 8, 2019
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READ: A Viciously Racist Video Has Gone Viral In Which Two Girls Call For The Return Of Slavery And The KKK

Some Colleges And Universities Offer Affinity Housing For Highly Diverse Spectrum Of Students, Including Women Of Color

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Some Colleges And Universities Offer Affinity Housing For Highly Diverse Spectrum Of Students, Including Women Of Color

@fairhousing / Twitter

The human race is no stranger to segregation. In the United States, Jim Crow laws and “separate but equal” doctrine kept people racially separated for decades. In Germany, there were the Nuremberg Laws. In South Africa, Apartheid. Today, segregation in our country takes a different form—no longer supported by law, it is pervasive yet subtle, an intersectional issue rooted in gender, race, and socioeconomic status. While legally dividing people based on their differences is indisputably wrong, a complex question emerges: Could the cultivation of ethnic, religious, and racial minority communities actually yield positive outcomes for the people within those communities? Many signs point to yes.

On college campuses, this question underscores the phenomenon of “affinity housing”—spaces where minority students can live alongside peers who share important aspects of their identities.

credit: vassar.edu

The debate around affinity housing has spanned the past 50 years, beginning with active calls for change from students at numerous institutions in 1969 (Williams College, Vassar College, and Wesleyan University, to name a few). At Williams College, the discussion began when members of the Williams Afro-American Society occupied Hopkins Hall until the school president responded to a series of requests, including the development of a residence hall specifically for Black students. While that demand wasn’t met at the time—leading to a reemergence of the issue last year—students at Vassar and Wesleyan were more successful, resulting in Wesleyan’s “Malcolm X House” and Vassar’s “Kendrick House”—dorms specifically designated to Black students, which still exist today.

Now, in 2019, a wide number of colleges and universities offer affinity housing for a highly diverse spectrum of students, including women of color, Asians and Asian-Americans, Latinx populations, and LGBTQ groups. Proponents of affinity housing argue that these communal residences provide minority students with a sense of safety and security, especially at institutions with largely white student bodies. However, many people believe that affinity housing hearkens back to a darker epoch of American history, reviving segregationist tendencies that are fundamentally harmful to our progress as a society. Without a doubt, our country’s fraught past has definitely made the legal aspects of affinity housing a bit sticky.

According to the federal Fair Housing Act, it is illegal to discriminate against tenants based on their race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, and family status. 

credit: calstatela.edu

So, if a university offers affinity housing for Black students, it could get in trouble if white or Asian students were explicitly prohibited from living there. To avoid this, colleges provide students with the choice to reside in these spaces, using careful language to define their role on campus—for example, California State University’s website describes its Halisi Scholars Living Learning Community as having been “designed to enhance the residential experience for students who are a part of or interested in issues regarding the Black community.” While it focuses on fostering a sense of community for Black students, the Halisi Scholars LLC is available to any student invested in issues of Black culture. Thus, as long as the option to join an affinity housing residence is inclusive to all, there is nothing illegal about it.

Although it can make affinity housing tricky to navigate, the Fair Housing Act protects folks all over the country. In certain states and cities, the protections expand even further to include factors like age, sexual orientation, marital status, gender, and citizenship status. Given the diversity of the U.S. population, these measures are absolutely essential to maintaining liberty and preserving our rights; yet history reveals that in spite of this legislation, marginalized communities are still most affected by housing discrimination, which perhaps points to affinity housing as a productive response to a long and unsavory trend.

Netflix’s “Dear White People” touches on the topic of affinity housing, illustrating the polemic nature of this issue through its characters’ divergent opinions. 

credit: Jonathan Leibson/Getty Images

While some characters, like Coco Conners—a Black economics student who serves as treasurer for Winchester University’s Coalition of Racial Equality—do not support the new Armstrong-Parker dorm (a residence hall for students of color), several other characters find community there. Yvette Lee Bowser, executive producer of the series, describes this point in the show as a “renaissance” for the predominantly white, fictional Ivy League school.

“Everyone wants to have a sense of community, no matter what their cultural background is,” says Bowser. “That’s really what Armstrong-Parker is about—a built-in sense of community.” As a woman of color, Bowser attended Stanford University, which also offers affinity housing. She reiterates that the housing assignments at Winchester are not meant to segregate, but to do the very opposite: the Amstrong-Parker dorm is designed to maintain connectivity within students’ own, preexistent communities. “You don’t choose to go to a predominantly white institution only to be with black people,” she says. “You want the diverse experience, but you also want to feel those creature comforts and culture comforts.”

Racist Road Rage Incident In Louisiana caught On Camera And People Are Asking For Justice

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Racist Road Rage Incident In Louisiana caught On Camera And People Are Asking For Justice

@ThatGirl_Jess_ / Twitter

A middle-aged white man was caught on camera verbally assaulting a young black woman, repeatedly calling her a ‘stupid, f***ing n*****’ in Louisiana this weekend. The victim, Jessica Fontenot, recorded the entire assault on her phone, and later posted it to Twitter, where it’s reached 3 million views, and nearly 30k retweets at the time of publication. “So this is how my Sunday is going,” Jessica tweeted. “Never called this man out his name never got angry with this man at all! This is what we are living in. I will definitely pray for this man!”

Twitter users have identified the man as Seth Broussard, and are actively ensuring his employer knows how he treats black women on the road.

Jessica Fontenot started recording after the first time Broussard used the racist slur.

Credit: @ThatGirl_Jess_ / Twitter

Broussard rolled down the window of his pickup truck, and seemed to slowly repeat himself, saying “I said you were talking crazy, you stupid, f****** n*****.” In a sarcastically friendly tone, he asked, “Did you get it that time?” He seemed to stop in the middle of the street, and shouted, “I said n*****,” as he sped off. 

Jessica continued to record as she followed him. “Okay, cool. This n***** right here. Wow, y’all. I didn’t even do anything. Didn’t even do anything, y’all,” she told the camera in obvious shock. Then, the man tried to brake check her, suddenly braking, forcing her to swerve out of the way to avoid a collision. “This man right here. Yup. This man right here called me a ‘fucking n*****’. Oh my gosh,” she told the camera as she skillfully evaded a car accident with a road rager, all while attempting to record the assault.

“This is the world we are living in today,” Fontenot calmly tells the camera.

Credit: @ThatGirl_Jess_ / Twitter

As he sped up to the red light, Jessica tells us, “This is what we are living in today. I’m going to record this whole thing. Never called this man out his name or anything.” You can hear Broussard’s screech again as he attempts to cause a collision, braking suddenly. He rolls down his window and sticks his arm out to facetiously, dramatically wave at Jessica. “Wow. That shows you,” Fontenot comments as the light turns green. “You know what? I’m not going to let this man mess up my Sunday. He’s not going to get to me, but it just shows you that we’re still living in this time period, y’all. We’re still going through racism. Shit’s crazy. Old ass man talking to a young black female like that. It’s sad.”

Twitter heard Fontenot when she told us, “I got his license plate. I got his truck. Wow.”

Credit: Josh Arnett / Facebook

Yup. Twitter followed through and identified the man as Seth Broussard. While Broussard has made his social media accounts invisible, Twitter took screenshots. A tweet that listed the email address for HydroChemPSC, the employer Broussard listed on LinkedIn, has been retweeted 1.3k times. The emails and Facebook comments on the company page were so overwhelming, the company spoke out. 

Early Monday morning, HydroChemPSC stated, “HydroChemPSC has been made aware of the video taken on Sunday, November 10 in the Lake Charles area. The individual was not employed with our company when this incident occurred. We understand the concern many of you have expressed and we share that concern. Thank you.” Even though Broussard does not work for the company any longer, HydroChemPSC employees have acknowledged that they know Broussard, effectively corroborating Twitter’s identification of the man.

Justice for Fontenot now lies in the hands of the Lake Charles Police Department.

Credit: @ThatGirl_Jess_ / Instagram

While HydroChemPSC was an aim and a miss, Twitter has now taken to the Lake Charles Police Department Facebook page to utilize public pressure for results. “Any comment on this guy Seth Broussard?” one Facebook user commented on an unrelated post. So far, the police department has not released a comment.

“I hear the hurt in your voice. And I’m so sorry you went through that sister,” one Twitter user commented. “Press charges because he was tryna make y’all wreck into the back of him which is endangering y’all. He’s not gonna have a job pretty soon.” A young black man tweeted, “He would never pull this with a black MAN. Ever. Be careful out here…” Meanwhile, another young black woman tweeted to Jessica, “Don’t pray for him.”

Watch the full video below.

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