Things That Matter

[Video] Bolivian Family Members Captured Video Of The Man Who Set Himself On Fire In Front Of The White House

A man set himself on fire in front of the White House Ellipse Wednesday afternoon. According to the Secret Service, he was provided aid on site and soon after rushed to a hospital for treatment.

The incident occurred in the early afternoon by 15th Street NW and Constitution Avenue NW.

According to the Washington Post, D.C. fire department spokesman Vito Maggiolo confirmed that a burn victim had been transported. There are no reports on the man’s condition at this time.

Alina Berzins, a 17-year-old girl living in Alexandria, Va. was sight-seeing with cousins from Bolivia captured the incident on video.

Berzins told CNBC that she and her cousins “saw this man” on the Ellipse and that eventually, he started “running, and then we saw him covered in flames.”

Video of the man burning, shows him walking on the green while inflamed and smoke billowing from the lawn.

The White House has made no comments on the incident at this time.

Watch a video of the event below.

Ana Navarro And Meghan McCain Got Into A Screaming Match On National TV, And People Are Praising Every Second Of It

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Ana Navarro And Meghan McCain Got Into A Screaming Match On National TV, And People Are Praising Every Second Of It

Youtube

We love a good throw down in the name of reality TV. Drama is what makes TV worth watching — it’s like a real-life telenovela, and we don’t care if people on TV are doing it just for the ratings. We live for it. One of our favorite reality shows — which is technically not a reality show, but rather a talk show — is “The View.” Those ladies can fight about anything. In this political climate of us vs. them — a/k/a the Republicans vs. the Democrats — you will not get a better TV experience, while also getting informative perspectives, than “The View.” 

And today’s episode did not disappoint. 

This might not come as a surprise, but Ana Navarro And Meghan McCain literally yelled at each other on “The View” and left viewers gasping for air. 

Credit: YouTube

The two “View” co-anchors got into a fighting match while discussing the latest Donald Trump scandal. Navarro, who typically appears on “The View” on Fridays, was discussing the topic of a whistleblower who came forward to say that President Donald Trump had talks with leaders of Ukraine in secret. 

McCain attempted to make a point — which didn’t actually make any sense — that liberals didn’t like how Julian Assage released classified documents yet had issues with the whistleblower disclosing information about Trump and Ukraine.  

McCain tried to correct herself and inadvertently began interrupting Navarro while she was speaking.

Credit: YouTube

Once McCain realized that her point didn’t make sense, she tried to correct herself as Navarro was talking, and she really wanted to every one to hear her, which is why she began speaking very, very loudly. 

“Excuse me, maybe I was clumsy in the way that I said it,” McCain said rather forcefully. Then Navarro said, pretty calmly, “you don’t have to scream at me.”  

McCain said to Navarro, “I don’t know what you just said.” Navarro responded by saying, I said, don’t scream at me. I’m two feet away!”

Credit: YouTube

The audience was clearly in shock, and McCain said, “you know, that’s so rude, Ana.” They quickly cut to a commercial break, but the camera definitely caught McCain walking off the set. By the time the show returned, it was as if the whole thing never happened. It was so weird! They began to talk about another topic, and the two ladies behaved pretty chill toward each other. It almost reminded us of how we are during Thanksgiving dinner when one moment we are fighting with everyone and the next, we’re all good friends again. 

Even though the spat lasted two seconds, people on social media ate up the drama with a spoon.

We love a good fight, but that doesn’t mean they have to get physical. That would be the end of “The View”! 

You know we had to pick a side. 

We’re always rooting for our girl, Ana. Always!

Why did the segment get so heated in the first place?

These ladies can throwdown about anything, honestly. McCain has a thin skin because she always gets frustrated that enough people do not agree with her. 

The two women have gone head-to-head in the past, and we can see why they have more tension lately. 

McCain’s husband has made fun of Navarro on Twitter. What the heck?

We can always count on Navarro to piss her off. 

This is not the first time Navarro and McCain have not seen eye-to-eye on a topic; in fact, fighting is what they do best. We’re just a bit surprised at the tone that it got to today. 

McCain was clearly more pissed off at the fact that she messed up her point entirely.

McCain didn’t explain herself well in the first place, so we’re thinking her error plus the fact that everyone else was not seeing her point is what made her upset. Navarro has never backed down if she has felt disrespected.

McCain is going to have to toughen up if she wants to last on the show.

Lots of women have left “The View” because they’re tired of the bickering, so McCain better get a grip or she going to end up going back to Fox News. Girl, we are begging you DO NOT LEAVE “THE VIEW”! 

If McCain leaves, who will fight with Navarro or any of the other women?

Out of all the other Republican hosts on “The View” McCain is our favorite, so we are pleading. Stick it out, girl. It’s Friday, let’s get a drink and pretend like this never happened. 

Check out the whole exchange below, and get some popcorn too!

READ: Watch Ana Navarro Take Down Meghan McCain On ‘The View’ While Debating DACA

An Incoming International Harvard Student Has Been Denied Entry To The United States

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An Incoming International Harvard Student Has Been Denied Entry To The United States

Cengiz Yar / Getty Images

The Trump administration’s immigration policies are criminalizing survivors, tearing families apart and emboldening racists and xenophobes throughout the country. But President Donald Trump’s anti-immigration agenda is also negatively impacting higher education in the US. According to multiple recent reports, it has become increasingly difficult for international students to receive their visas, also adding a greater workload on universities and their employees who try to help students work through the red tape and advocate on their behalf.

Those in higher education and immigration law say that the process for international students to attain their visas have become harder under Trump.

 According to government data, approval of student visas is down and many remain in limbo for longer periods. The latest available department data show that student visas declined by more than 100 thousand from 2016 to 2018. This has led to an overall decrease in the number of new international students enrolled at US colleges. For instance, survey data collected by the Institute of International Education during the 2016–17 school year found that enrollment of international students fell by 3 percent from the previous year. In the most recent data, which looks at the 2017–18 school year, it fell by close to 7 percent.

NAFSA: Association of International Educators reports that these visa obstacles started after Trump issued a memorandum in 2017 that called for the “heightened screening and vetting of applications for visas and other immigration benefits” as well as new or updated requirements for visa holders studying or working at US colleges. Additionally, the Atlantic reports that changes initiated by the Trump administration in 2018 made it even harder for recent graduates with student visas to continue living in the country legally. 

“I’ve been in the field for almost 20 years, and the amount of immigration changes during the last three years has been exponential,” Kristy Magner, who oversees Tulane University’s Office of International Students and Scholars, told the publication. 

One of the most high-profile cases was that of Ismail B. Ajjawi

In August of 2019, the incoming Harvard Palestinian freshman from Lebanon was detained by US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at a Boston airport. The 17-year-old was denied entry after CBO officers found social media posts from his friends that criticize the US. As a result, Ajjawi’s visa was canceled. However, because the teen was detained at an airport, sparing him from being officially deported, he was able to re-apply for a visa back home. Ten days later, Ajjawi returned to Boston and was able to start school.

Also in August, nine Chinese students who were returning to the US as undergraduate students at Arizona State University were detained at Los Angeles International Airport.

 According to the university, the students were in CBP custody for a week and were “denied admission to the U.S. to continue their studies.” They were ultimately forced to return to China, despite being “academically eligible to return to ASU and to the United States under their visas.”

“[I]t is beyond my comprehension how the U.S. government could establish and implement policies that bring about the outcomes we are now witnessing,” ASU president Michael Crow wrote in a letter addressed to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan. 

While these cases are among the most extreme, they follow a growing pattern of increased difficulty for international students. 

Many institutions, including New York University, expressed seeing more students denied travel in advance of their trips.

NYU was one of the first schools to establish support for immigrant students upon the start of Trump’s presidency. In January 2017, just days after Trump’s inauguration, it created the Immigrant Defense Initiative, which offers “free, confidential advice and representation” to students and staff who could be at risk for deportation. Other universities, including Columbia University, the California State University system and George Washington University, now also offer free immigration-related legal services for students. 

But students, and now university employees who are tasked with new responsibilities in helping the international academics, need more help. Back in July, Harvard University president Lawrence Bacow sent a letter to Pompeo and McAleenan sharing his grievances. “Students report difficulties getting initial visas — from delays to denials,” he wrote. “Scholars have experienced postponements and disruptions for what have previously been routine immigra­tion processes such as family visas, renewals of status, or clearance for international travel.”

Dr. Hironao Okahana, associate vice president of policy and research analysis at the Council of Graduate Schools, told Teen Vogue the rise in incidents like Ajjawi’s are concerning and worth further investigation. 

“[W]e’ll be carefully observing to see if any additional incidents occur as quarter-system schools begin their term in a few weeks,” he said.

In addition to the denial of visas and slowed-down processes, universities face another problem: Trump’s anti-immigration agenda is stopping international students from applying to US institutions. 

“I think that both [the Trump administration’s] immigration policy and the messaging of the day are literally turning [international] students away … and making them less inclined to want to study in the United States,” Brian Rosenberg, the president of Macalester College, a liberal-arts institution in St. Paul, Minnesota, told the Atlantic.

As a result, some schools are doing additional work to ensure international students that they are welcome at their universities.

Philip A. Glotzbach, the president of Skidmore College, told the Atlantic that his staff has had to “work a lot harder” to recruit and retain international students. Additionally, Barbara K. Altmann, the president of Franklin & Marshall College, said that her school has been taking “extraordinary measures … so international students know [they’re welcome here].” For instance, because one in five students at the Lancaster, Pennsylvania, liberal-arts school is from outside of the US, mostly China, it has created a network of Chinese nationals that send reassuring messages to incoming students from the Asian country. 

“These incidents,” said Okahana, “as isolated as they may be, are troubling and have created chilling effects.”

Read: Migrants Are Dying In US Immigration Custody And Here’s What You Need To Know About The Victims